Queen's University

Student satisfaction survey underway

 
2011-04-04

Every year, students finishing programs in Arts and Science, Engineering and Applied Science, Nursing, Commerce, Education, and Law have a chance to express their opinions and impressions of their learning experience at Queen's through the Undergraduate Exit Poll.

“The Exit Poll is an invaluable tool that lets us hear directly from our students and measure progress towards the University’s goal of delivering a quality education and exceptional all-round student experience,” says Jo-Anne Brady, University Registrar. “The results help guide and inform strategic decisions, and we are able to analyze results over time.”

The 2011 poll is now underway; students have until April 21 to complete the questionnaire and give the University valued feedback.

The 17th annual poll, conducted in 2010, found that 81 percent of students who completed the questionnaire agreed that their overall experience as a student at Queen’s was excellent. Students in the Queen’s School of Business expressed the greatest satisfaction at 94 percent, while the School of Nursing followed at 90 percent.

Students are asked a variety of questions that assess their degree of satisfaction with their learning experience, the contribution of their education to learning and development, and services and facilities. Questions are also asked about student debt and post-graduation plans.

While most results have remained fairly consistent over the past several years, the new Athletics and Recreation Centre in the Queen’s Centre has significantly boosted overall approval of athletic facilities. In spite of the fact that the graduating class of 2010 only had access to these facilities for their final term, satisfaction rates tripled.

View the 2010 Exit Poll results on the Office of the University Registrar’s website.

 

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