Department of Philosophy

Queen's University
Search Type

DEPARTMENT OF

Philosophy

site header

300 Level Courses              

These are courses and descriptions for 2017-18. 

 

_________________________________________________________________ 

PHIL 301—Bioethics

K. Gordon Solmon

FALL (3.0)

An investigation of some moral issues arising in connection with health care, including: the relationship between patient and health care provider; reproductive decision‐making; euthanasia and the nature of death; and the development of health care policy.

 

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;84P)

PREREQUISITE (Completed 60.0 or more units) or (Registration in a ‘Faculty of Medicine’ plan).

EXCLUSION May not be taken with or after PHIL 247/3.0.

 

PHIL 303—Ethics and Business

R. Kumar

FALL (3.0)

An examination of the moral principles involved in the evaluation of business institutions, practices and decisions. Sample topics include:  liberty, efficiency and the free market ideal; the market and justice in distribution.

 

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;84P)

PREREQUISITE Completed 60.0 or more units.

EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from PHIL 303/3.0; COMM 338/3.0.

 

 

PHIL 316—Philosophy of Art

D. Knight

FALL (3.0)

We start by considering general questions that arise in the philosophy of art and in aesthetics.  For instance:  What is art?  What is art for?  How can we tell the good art from the bad art, let alone the art from the non-art?  And alternatively:  What is beauty?  Is beauty a value?  If so, then what do we make of other aesthetic properties, such as the ugly, the tragic, or the sublime?  What if any standards to we have for making judgements about these things?

We will also look specifically at a range of art forms such as:  painting, photography, film, architecture, literature, music, the performance arts, as well as mass and popular arts.  What sorts of things does a philosophy of the visual arts need to consider, and how would it be different from a philosophy of literature or a philosophy of music?

You will be encouraged to develop good critical skills by thinking about and writing about the course readings.  You will also develop your interpretative skills with respect to works of art.  Lectures will be punctuated with a variety of examples to help illustrate issues from our readings and to help focus discussion.

You can expect some combination of longer (around 5-6 pages) and shorter (around 2-3 pages) written assignments, an in-class test, and a final two-hour exam.

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;84P)

PREREQUISITE Completed 60.0 or more units.

 

PHIL 318—Philosophy of Law

TBA

FALL (3.0)

A survey of the central issues in the philosophy of law including a consideration of current jurisprudential controversies about the nature of law and philosophical treatments of problems arising from within the law such as paternalism, privacy, responsibility, and civil liberties.

 

PREREQUISITE Completed 60.0 or more units.

PREREQUISITE   Completed 60.0 or more units.

 

PHIL 329—Early Modern

J. Miller

WINTER (3.0)

The seventeenth century saw the appearance of some of the most ambitious and awe-inspiring philosophical systems ever produced in Western philosophy.  This course will study three of them:  those by Descartes (1596-1650), Spinoza (1632-1677) and Leibniz (1646-1716).  We shall proceed chronologically, starting with Descartes, where we will read his *Meditations* and possibly excerpts from other works.  An understanding of Descartes will better equip us to understand Spinoza's magnum opus, the *Ethics*.  After we have grappled with this difficult work, we shall turn to Spinoza's most important heir, Leibniz.  Unlike Spinoza, Leibniz never produced a single great work.  Our readings will include his *Monadology* and other pieces.  By the end of the course, students will have an appreciation of the accomplishment of these philosophers as well as the problems with their philosophies.

 

LEARNING HOURS   120 (36L;84P)

PREREQUISITE   PHIL 250/6.0 or PHIL 257/6.0 or permission of the Department.

 

PHIL 343—Social and Political PHIL

K. Gordon-Solmon

WINTER (3.0)

An examination of some of the principles and theories to which appeal is commonly made when social institutions and practices (and the policies associated with their establishment and maintenance) are subjected to critical scrutiny.

 

PREREQUISITE PHIL 257/6.0 or permission of the Department.

 

PHIL 347—Contemporary Moral Philosophy

R. Kumar

WINTER (3.0)

A critical survey of some recent trends in moral philosophy. Study will begin with the emotive theory of ethics, and end with very recent works of importance in the field.

 

PREREQUISITE PHIL 257/6.0 or permission of the Department.

 

PHIL 352—Metaphysics

M.C. Smith

WINTER (3.0)

The nature and varieties of metaphysics, including rationalistic ‘Platonist’ and empirical/descriptive ‘Aristotelian’ approaches. Positivistic and pragmatic anti‐metaphysical ‘critiques’ and verificationism. Contemporary analytical metaphysics after Quine and Strawson.

 

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;84P)

PREREQUISITE PHIL 250/6.0 or permission of the Department.

 

PHIL 361—Introduction to Logic

N Salay

FALL (3.0)

From propositional calculus to first-order monadic predicate calculus. Symbolization, rules of inference, derivation and refutation of arguments.

 

LEARNING HOURS   120 (36L;84P) PREREQUISITE    A GPA of 2.0 in 6.0 units in PHIL.

ONE-WAY EXCLUSION   May not be taken with or after: CISC 204

 

Phil 362—Further Studies in Logic

A. Mercier

FALL (3.0)

From first-order monadic predicate calculus to polyadic predicate calculus with identity. Symbolization, rules of inference, derivation and refutation of arguments. Introduction to modal logics.

PREREQUISITE   PHIL 361/3.0 or ELEC 270/3.0.

 

PHIL 373-- Continental Philosophy: 1900–1960
Paul Fairfield
FALL (3.0)

This lecture course provides an analysis of key figures and texts in continental European philosophy between 1900 and 1960. After a few lectures on Edmund Husserl, the founder of twentieth-century phenomenology, we shall study key works by Martin Heidegger, Karl Jaspers, and Albert Camus. Major topics will include phenomenology, existentialism, and hermeneutics. The format will be lecture with discussion.

LEARNING HOURS   120 (36L;84P)

PREREQUISITE   Completed 60.0 or more units.

PHIL 374-- Continental Philosophy: 1960–The Present
Paul Fairfield
WINTER (3.0)

This lecture course provides an analysis of key figures and texts in continental European philosophy between 1960 and today. We shall study key works by Hans-Georg Gadamer, Michel Foucault, and Calvin Schrag. Major topics will include hermeneutics and poststructuralism, among others. The format will be lecture with discussion.

LEARNING HOURS   120 (36L;84P)

PREREQUISITE   Completed 60.0 or more units.

 

_________________________________________________________________________