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Queen's University
 

400 Level Courses

Course Offerings for 2015-16:

Please note when prerequisites list level 4 as a requirement, this means the 4th year of your program.  It does not mean admitted to Honours. 

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PHIL 405/3.0 Current Issues in Social and Political Philosophy I        3S

W. Kymlicka Fall Term 

PREREQUISITE: Level 4 and registration in a PHIL Major or Medial plan and (a minimum GPA of 2.60 in PHIL250/6.0 and PHIL257/6.0) and (6.0 units in PHIL).

"Citizenship" has arguably been the central organizing concept for advancing claims of justice in the past century. Demands for women's rights, gay rights, disability rights, children's rights, minority rights – even animal rights - have all been rearticulated as struggles for new forms of citizenship. All of these cases challenge inherited ideas of what defines the attributes of a (good) citizen, and in much of the popular debate and academic literature, attempts to extend citizenship to some of these groups are sometimes seen as diluting the fundamental values of citizenship. This course will explore the frontiers of citizenship. In particular, it will explore whether citizenship should be understood, not in terms of some static list or threshold of capacities or virtues, but rather as a process of what Jim Tully calls “citizenization” – the attempt to restructure social and political relationships on the basis of democratic values of consent, participation, trust, membership and autonomy rather than on the basis of force or paternalism or exclusion. Viewed this way, the task of citizenship is to enable all members of society to have a say in matters that affect them, and to thereby contribute to the democratic governance of the larger society, even if they do not participate in the particular ways or in the particular spaces envisaged in classical citizenship theory. The course will explore what we gain, and we might potentially lose, in opening up citizenship theory to radically diverse forms of belonging and participation.

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PHIL 406/3.0  Current Issues in Social and Political Philosophy II               3S

C. Sypnowich Winter Term

TBA

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PHIL 420/3.0 Ethical Issues I 3S

U. Schuklenk, Fall Term 

PREREQUISITE:  Level 4 and registration in a PHIL Major or Medial plan and (a minimum GPA of 2.60 in PHIL250/6.0 and PHIL257/6.0) and (6.0 units in PHIL). 

TBA

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PHIL 421/3.0 Ethical Issues I 3S

C. Overall, Winter Term 

PREREQUISITE:  Level 4 and registration in a PHIL Major or Medial plan and (a minimum GPA of 2.60 in PHIL250/6.0 and PHIL257/6.0) and (6.0 units in PHIL). 

TBA

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PHIL 431/3.0 Ancient Philosophy I      3S

S. Leighton, Fall Term 

PREREQUISITE:  Level 4 and registration in a PHIL Major or Medial plan and (a minimum GPA of 2.60 in PHIL250/6.0 and PHIL257/6.0) and (6.0 units in PHIL). 

TBA

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PHIL 441/3.0  20th Century Philosophy I     3S

P. Fairfield, Fall Term 

PREREQUISITE:  Level 4 and registration in a PHIL Major or Medial plan and (a minimum GPA of 2.60 in PHIL250/6.0 and PHIL257/6.0) and (6.0 units in PHIL). 

TBA

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PHIL 445/3.0 Major Figures I:  The Unknown Descartes    3S

M. Smith, Fall Term 

PREREQUISITE:  Level 4 and registration in a PHIL Major or Medial plan and (a minimum GPA of 2.60 in PHIL250/6.0 and PHIL257/6.0) and (6.0 units in PHIL). 

Descartes is best known as a defender of dualism; in the Meditations, he seems to rip the human person into two halves, the mind on the one hand and the body on the other. But can mind and body be sewn back together again? Much less well-known is Descartes’s later attempt to account for the wholeness of the embodied human person, a project that begins with Descartes’s exchange of letters with Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia (which we will read), and culminates in his last book, The Passions of the Soul. We will examine the Passions in detail, and explore Descartes’s account of agency, embodiment, ethics, happiness, and love.

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PHIL 452/3.0 Current Issues in Metaphysics I 3S

H. Laycock Winter Term 

PREREQUISITE:  Level 4 and registration in a PHIL Major or Medial Plan and (a minimum GPA of 2.60 in PHIL250/6.0 and PHIL257/6.0) and (6.0 units in PHIL). 

The idea that the structure of a sentence can reflect or illuminate the structure of reality is expressed clearly in Aristotle's Categories. The idea is carried forward in contemporary work in the philosophy of language, logic and ontology. In this course, the relationship between these fields of study is examined in relation to the influential thought of Frege, Quine, the linguist Otto Jespersen, and philosophers who have explored Jespersen's groundbreaking idea of the difference between 'the world of countables' and 'the world of uncountables'.
  
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PHIL 463/3.0 Current Issues in Metaphysics II    3S

D. Knight Winter Term (Mon 2:30 - 5:30)

PREREQUISITE: Level 4 and registration in a PHIL Major or Medial plan and (a minimum GPA of 2.60 in PHIL250/6.0 and PHIL257/6.0) and (6.0 units in PHIL).

TBA

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Kingston, Ontario, Canada. K7L 3N6. 613.533.2000