Queen's University

Department of

Public Health Sciences

DEPARTMENT OF

Public Health Sciences

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HPV vaccine should not be delayed, Queen’s researcher argues

HPV vaccine should not be delayed, Queen’s researcher argues


Vaccine significantly reduces precursor to cervical cancer in girls as young as 14 years old.

New research out of Queen’s University shows early benefits from the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in young girls.

The HPV vaccine, which protects against four types of HPV shown to cause cervical cancer and anogenital warts, is offered free through school-based programs to young girls across Canada. Despite the fact the vaccine is free, vaccine rates are lower than expected in a number of regions, in part because parents perceive their daughter’s level of sexual activity as low at young ages.

“We observed a large and significant reduction in cervical dysplasia, a precursor to cervical cancer, in girls as young as 14-17 years,” says Leah Smith and Linda Lévesque, researchers with the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) at Queen’s University.

This study, carried out in collaboration with researchers at McGill University, also found the vaccine is starting to decrease genital warts in this population.

“The fact that these benefits were observed in such a young age group strengthens current recommendations that vaccination should not be delayed,” says Dr. Smith, lead author on the study.

This most recent study followed 260,493 girls, half of whom were eligible for Ontario’s publicly funded Grade 8 HPV vaccination program in its first two years (2007/08 and 2008/09). Researchers found that among the 2,436 cases of cervical dysplasia documented between Grades 10 to 12, 44 per cent fewer cases occurred in eligible girls who received the vaccine. The research showed that one case of cervical dysplasia was prevented for every 175 eligible girls vaccinated.

“Although the vast majority of cases prevented by the vaccine would not have progressed to cervical cancer, given the burden of cervical dysplasia on the emotional and physical well-being of girls as well as on the health-care system, these early reductions are nevertheless of great importance,” says Dr. Lévesque.

The research was published in the journal Pediatrics.

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MSc and MPH students in Arviat, Nunavut

MSc and MPH students in Arviat, Nunavut


Graduate students Eleanor Vandermeer (MPH '15) and Laura Davis (MSc '16) recently sent the Department of Public Health Sciences pictures from Arviat, Nunavut.

Eleanor is currently on her Master of Public Health Practicum (EPID 888) in which she is carrying out an evaluation of the Community Cluster Plan in Arviat, Nunavut. Eleanor explained, “I will be interviewing program coordinators, collecting budget information, calculating program coverage, facilitating focus groups with participants and performing a random sample survey to find out whether community members know about the existing programs".  Eleanor hopes that her results and recommendations will be used to inform the development of the next Community Cluster Plan.

Laura is currently carrying out research on the description and patterns of pop consumption in Canadian children, with a focus on pop consumption in Nunavut where consumption tends to be high. Laura explained, "While in Arviat, I am interviewing principals and teachers who run the Drop the Pop program, a program which encourages school-aged children to make healthy food and beverage choices".  Laura will also be interviewing health professionals, the oral health therapist and store managers to get their opinions on pop consumption and the negative health consequences in the community.

As well as carrying out their respective research projects both have had the opportunity to go dog sledding, snowmobiling and were able to see the Northern Lights. 

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Yvonne Murray successfully defends her MSc thesis

Yvonne Murray successfully defends her MSc thesis ​


On Tuesday April 22, 2015, MSc candidate Yvonne Murray successfully defended her MSc thesis to the Department of Public Health Sciences. Yvonne's thesis title was Comparing the Responsiveness of Two Health-Related Quality of Life Instruments in a Phase III Randomized Clinical Trial of Men with Prostate Cancer (NCIC CTG PR.3) The QLQ-C30+3 with PR17 Trial Specific Checklist Versus the Fact-P. She was supervised by Drs. Harriet Richardson and Michael Brundage, and her examiners were Drs. Joan Tranmer (School of Nursing), Will Pickett (PHS) and Joan Almost (School of Nursing). Yvonne will continue in her role as Study Coordinator in NCIC Clinical Trials Group, Queen's University. Congratulations Yvonne. 

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Outdoor play keeps the doctor away

Outdoor play keeps the doctor away


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ViewPoint: Crowd-sourcing nearby heroes

ViewPoint: Crowd-sourcing nearby heroes


Here at Queen’s University, there are thousands of students, faculty, and staff with up-to-date CPR training. As a community, we have the opportunity to change the cardiac arrest statistics in our city and save more lives. If you are interested in learning more about PulsePoint, I encourage you to come out to the Queen’s launch of the app where we will showcase how it works first hand. We are hosting it on April 7 in the ARC main gym from 1:30-2 pm. In the meantime, you can follow the key steps outlined below to get PulsePoint up and running on your phone.
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Atif Kukaswadia successfully defends his PhD thesis

Atif Kukaswadia successfully defends his PhD thesis


On Friday, March 27, 2015, PhD candidate Atif Kukaswadia successfully defended his PhD thesis to the Department of Public Health Sciences.  Atif's thesis title was Acculturation and Health Experiences Among Young Immigrant Canadians. He was supervised by Drs. Will Pickett and Ian Janssen, and his examiners were Drs. Chris Ardern (School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, York University), Lucie Pelland (Rehabilitation Therapy), Audrey Kobayashi (Geography), ​Patti Groome (PHS), and Will King (PHS). Congratulations Atif. 

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Nicollette Kwon successfully defends his MSc thesis

Nicollette Kwon successfully defends her MSc thesis ​


On Friday February 13, 2015, MSc candidate Nicollette Kwon successfully defended her MSc thesis to the Department of Public Health Sciences. Nicollette's thesis title was Mapping the risk of breast cancer to exposure from traffic related air pollution using land use regression in Vancouver BC. She was supervised by Drs. Harriet Richardson, Michael McIsaac and Dongmei Chen, and her examiners were Drs. Elizabeth VanDenKerkhof (School of Nursing), Will Pickett (PHS), Will King (PHS), and Paul Villeneuve (Carleton University). Nicollette has gained employment with the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care as a Data Analyst. Congratulations Nicollette. 

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Let's Talk: Queen's Prof Helps End the Stigma on Mental Health

Department of Public Health Sciences Professor Dr. Heather Stuart is the Bell Canada Mental Health and Anti-stigma Research Chair.

Dr. Stuart's five basic anti-stigma mental health tips have shaped the current Bell Let's Talk ad campaign.

http://www.queensu.ca/gazette/stories/taking-talk-another-level?utm_sour...

Today is Let's Talk Day! http://letstalk.bell.ca/en/end-the-stigma/

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