Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy
Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Departmental Colloquium - The LHC and ATLAS: observatories of the infinitesimally small

Jean-François Arguin,
Associate Professor
Département de Physique
Université de Montréal

Friday January 19th, 2018
2:30 p.m. Stirling A

Abstract:

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a formidable apparatus capable of colliding pairs of protons flying at 99.999999% of the speed of light, and that every 25 nanoseconds. Large particle detectors, such as the ATLAS experiment of which Canada is a member, are located around a few collision points. Every particle known to date has a quantum probability to be produced in these collisions. The LHC thus constitutes an excellent laboratory for an exhaustive study of particle physics. The LHC should also be able to produce new particles, dubbed “beyond the Standard Model”, whose discovery would represent a big leap in our understanding of the Universe. Finding such particules in the O(10^16) collisions produced every year at the LHC is a difficult task. I will illustrate how this is performed by using the search for Supersymmetry as an example. Supersymmetry implies the existence of bosonic partners to every fermions in the Standard Model of particle physics (and vice-versa), which solves several of the problems of the Standard Model simultaneously such as providing a viable candidate for dark matter.