Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Queen's University
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Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy
Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Departmental Colloquium - Small Angle X-ray Scattering – past, present, and future roles in guiding intelligent material design

Marsha Singh,
Queen's University

November 25th, 2016
1:30 p.m. Theatre A

Abstract:

 Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) has a long history, dating back to the 1930s.  Initially, the technique was thought to have great promise as a non-destructive probe of nanoscale features of metals and alloys which are directly correlated to their macroscopic properties, such as elasticity, ductility, strength, and fracture toughness.  These hopes were severely diminished in the 1960’s with the sobering discovery of the role played by parasitic Bragg scattering when using hard x-rays to probe microstructure in crystalline materials.  The lessons of the past have been repeatedly overlooked as ready access to bright synchrotron light sources, coupled with dramatic success stories of SAXS studies of non-crystalline systems, make it impossible to resist applying SAXS to the study of metals.  This presentation will provide a brief overview of the past, present, and future of synchrotron SAXS as a tool for the study of metal alloy nanostructures with the ultimate goal of informing intelligent material design.