Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy
Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Icefishing for Neutrinos

Tyce DeYoung
University of Maryland

Monday, August 16, 2004
10:30 AM @ Stirling C

Abstract:

Almost all we know about the universe is derived from the observation of photons. As astronomers have developed instruments to exploit new regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to gamma rays, fascinating new objects have been revealed. At very high energies, however, the universe itself becomes opaque to photons, making astronomy difficult. Many observed phenomena, such as Gamma Ray Bursts, are poorly understood. Other objects which must exist, like the sources of the high energy cosmic rays, have not yet been identified.

Neutrinos offer a useful alternative to photons as astronomical messenger particles. Over the last two decades, neutrinos from astrophysical sources have proved useful for both astrophysics and particle physics. The IceCube neutrino telescope, under construction at the South Pole, will give us a new window on the universe at TeV energies and above. It will also permit us to address topics in particle physics such as extra dimensions, supersymmetry, dark matter, neutrino oscillations, and magnetic monopoles.

Tyce DeYoung is a candidate for the SNOLAB Tier II CRC and will be available for individual meetings.

Refreshments will be available after the talk.