Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Queen's University
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Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy
Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Neutrinos on Ice​

Ken Clark
University of Toronto

Fri, Dec. 6, 2013
1:30 PM @ Stirling A

Abstract:

In the deep Antarctic glacier near South Pole Station Antarctica scientists have constructed the world?s largest neutrino detector; the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. Designed to detect neutrinos up to energies of a few EeV, which are expected to be produced in the most energetic events in the Universe, IceCube recently announced the observation of the highest energy astrophysical neutrinos ever detected. At the same time, with IceCube's low-energy extension DeepCore, investigations are on-going of fundamental neutrino measurements at 5 orders of magnitude lower energy. Highlighted in this talk will be the most recent results from IceCube and DeepCore. Further, I will discuss the latest developments in the proposed PINGU sub-array that would provide sensitivity down to a few GeV and open the possibility of a first measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy.