Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy
Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Queen’s receives $63.7 million federal government investment to form Canadian Particle Astrophysics Research Centre

  • Prof. Tony Noble

    Prof. Tony Noble, Interim Director of Canadian Particle Astrophysics Research Centre (CPARC), speaks at Queen's University's Stirling Hall during the funding announcement on Tuesday. (University Communications)

  • Dr. Daniel Woolf

    Principal Daniel Woolf thanks the Government of Canada after it invested $63.7 million from the Canada First Research Excellence Fund to support the creation of the Canadian Particle Astrophysics Research Centre (CPARC). (University Communications)

  • Dr. Steve Liss

    Vice-Principal of Research, Steven Liss speaks at Stirling Hall after it was announced that the Canadian Particle Astrophysics Research Centre (CPARC) had received $63.7 million from the Canada First Research Excellence Fund. (University Communications)

  • Prof. Marc Dignam, Department Head,  looking on during the news announcement

    Prof. Marc Dignam, Department Head, and others waiting for the exciting announcement. (Photo: Prof. Stéphane Courteau)

  • Prof. Marc Dignam, Department Head,  looking on during the news announcement

    Mark Gerretsen, MP of the Kingston and the Islands, speaks after it was announced that the Canadian Particle Astrophysics Research Centre (CPARC) had received $63.7 million from the Canada First Research Excellence Fund. (Photo: Prof. Stéphane Courteau)

  • Karina McInnis, Executive Director of the University Research Services

    Karina McInnis, Executive Director of University Research Services, who played a key role in preparing the CFREF proposal. (Photo: Prof. Stéphane Courteau)

  • Undergraduate, Liz Fletcher speaking at the news conference

    Undergraduate, Liz Fletcher speaking at the news conference after it was announced that the Canadian Particle Astrophysics Research Centre (CPARC) had received $63.7 million from the Canada First Research Excellence Fund. (Photo: Prof. Stéphane Courteau)

Queen's University has received $63.7 million in federal government investment from the Canada First Research Excellence Fund (CFREF). The fund supports the creation of the Canadian Particle Astrophysics Research Centre to strengthen partnerships between Queen’s and other Canadian universities, attract top talent and build on Canada’s position as a leader in the field. The exciting announcement was made today by Dr. Tony Noble - Interim Director of Canadian Particle Astrophysics Research Centre (CPARC), Dr. LIss -Vice-Principal (Research), Dr. Woolf -Principal and Vice-Chancellor, and Mark Gerretson-Member of Parliament for Kingston and the Islands at Queen's University's Stirling Hall, home of the Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy.

The new centre will be headquartered at Queen’s, with members located at seven affiliated Canadian universities and five affiliated research organizations. To support the centre’s continuing and future research and experiments, 41 positions for researchers, engineers, designers and technicians will be created. In addition, positions for approximately 18 postdoctoral fellows and 40 graduate students will be created on an annual basis. Queen’s has already committed to adding seven new faculty members – including two Tier II Canada Research Chairs – in support of the centre and its research aims.

Through this initiative we will develop new particle astrophysics detectors capable of probing the highest priority questions in physics today while integrating students, fostering greater international collaboration, engaging industry and cementing Canada’s place as the global leader in the field." —Prof. Tony Knoble, Interim Director of CPARC

In 2014, Queen’s announced the appointment of Dr. Gilles Gerbier as the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Particle Astrophysics. Dr. Art McDonald’s co-receipt of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics, and the awarding of the 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, came in recognition of his leadership role in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) team – many of whom are now leaders on the CPARC initiative.

For more information and details, please read the Queen's Gazette article.