Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy
Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Receiving the Nobel Prize in Physics

Highlights from the Nobel Week

  • Faculty, staff and students clapping as Professor Art McDonald receives his Nobel Prize in Physics

    Faculty, staff and students at Stirling Hall, clapping as Professor Art McDonald receives his Nobel Prize in Physics from King Carl XVI Gustaf in Stockholm.

    “It’s very exciting. There was great excitement when it was announced and I think it’s fantastic for the department and for Queen’s. I think it will help raise the university’s profile around the world. The impact of the award is going to be really important.”
    —Prof. Marc Dignam, Head of the Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy

    Here are a few links to celebrate the Nobel Prize: Celebrating the Nobel Prize, "A Great Honour", and McDonald presented Nobel Prize for Physics  

    (Photo: Queen's Gazette)

  • Prof. Emeritus and Nobel Laureate Arthur B. McDonald autographs a chair at Bistro Nobel at the Nobel Museum in Stockholm

    Professor Emeritus and Nobel Laureate Art McDonald follows a tradition by autographing a chair at Bistro Nobel at the Nobel Museum in Stockholm, 6 December 2015.
    Photo: Claudio Bresciani/TT.

     

  • Sweden’s Crown Princess Victoria and Physics Laureate Arthur McDonald

    Sweden’s Crown Princess Victoria and Physics Laureate Arthur McDonald at the Nobel Dinner.
    (Photo: Alexander Mahmoud Nobel Media)

     

Professor Emeritus Art McDonald received the Nobel Prize in Physics on Thursday, December 10th in Stockholm along with co-winner Dr. Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo.

During the Nobel Week (Dec 6 - 12), Dr. McDonald was busy with speeches and lectures. On Tuesday, December 8th, he gave his Noble Lecture on his research at Stockholm University.

Some thoughts on winning the Nobel Prize in Physics:

“I am so pleased to see Art up there. He is a really deserving scientist and just a terrific person to work with.  (The Nobel Prize) is a demonstration that we in Canada, and also here at Queen’s, are doing world-leading research. We’ve been doing this for years and getting this sort of recognition will excite students and get them interested in science. They’ll also be able to appreciate that they can do top-level science here in Canada as well.”—Prof. Mark Chen, the Gordon and Patricia Gray Chair in Particle Astrophysics

Tags: