Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy
Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy

Reduced Dimensionalities in High Temperature Superconductors

Demetra Psiachos
Department of Physics, Queen's University

Monday, November 25, 2002
1:30 PM @ Stirling A

Abstract:

My research is being carried out in the area of strongly correlated electronic systems. I will describe what models can be used to describe the dominant physics when conventional perturbation theory breaks down. The Nobel Prize-winning discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Bednorz and Muller, 1986) in cuprates (weakly interacting Cu-O planes), prompted the subsequent observations of some unusual features, incompatible with the traditional picture of metal physics. In spite of the exhaustive studies done on these materials, still no plausible theory exists which can serve to unify the experiments. I will describe a recent notion which may lead towards an understanding of the mechanism of superconductivity: spin and charge inhomogeneities, known as "stripes", which manifest themselves as one-dimensional structures. Experiments suggest that they are present and recent results obtained within our group indicate that these stripes may aid the establishment of superconductivity. In general though, it is not known whether stripes help, hinder, or even cause high temperature superconductivity. I will talk about this and other, more sophisticated, models I am working on to try to answer these kinds of questions.