Please enable javascript to view this page in its intended format.

Queen's University
 

Department of Political Studies

Graduate Courses and Timetable

The Department will be uploading the syllabi for graduate courses offered in the Fall term in early September.  The Winter term course syllabi will be uploaded in early January. Syllabi are available in PDF* format and you can access them by clicking on the course names highlighted in blue. 

The material on this website is copyrighted and is for the sole use of students registered in the following courses. The material on this website may be downloaded for a registered student's personal use, but shall not be distributed or disseminated to anyone other than students registered in the following courses. Failure to abide by these conditions is a breach of copyright, and may also constitute a breach of academic integrity under the University Senate's Academic Integrity Policy Statement.

Graduate Timetable 2013-2014 (as of Nov 1, 2013) 

Course Instructor(s) / Term Description

POLS 810:

Canadian Politics

Jonathan Rose

Winter Term 2014

A critical analysis of the literature on Canadian politics. Topics covered include parliamentary institutions, federalism, the courts, multiculturalism and citizenship, Aboriginal politics, women and politics, political economy, interest groups and social movements, the mass media, political parties, public opinion and voting.

POLS 830:

Comparative Politics I

Oded Haklai

Fall Term 2013

A systematic examination of political systems in order to account for significant similarities and variations among them.  At the core of the field are two issues: what are the major contending approaches to determining what is significant, and what is the nature of the comparative method? This course aims to develop criteria for choosing between approaches and research strategies for empirical work.

POLS 831: 
Comparative Politics II:

Political Ethnography

Cathy Conaghan

Winter Term 2014

This course deals with major topics in the current literature in the sub-field, including democracy and democratization, institutions and parties, political economy, political culture, selected policy areas, or particular parties, movements, and interest groups.
POLS 832: 
Theories and Politics of Nationalism

Zsuzsa Csergo

Winter Term 2014

This course examines major theoretical debates in the scholarship of nationalism and evaluates influential contributions to the understanding of nationalism in sub-state and global politics.  Readings combine broader theoretical approaches and empirical studies.

POLS 840:

Comparative Politics of Development

John Rapley

Fall Term 2013

A critical survey of the main theoretical approaches to development, including modernization theory, neo-Marxism, underdeveloped theory and neo-liberalism. These are considered in relation to issues of ethnicity and culture, the role of the nation state in development, technology and industrialization and the globalization of the world economy.

POLS 843:  
Gender and Globalization

Margaret Little

Fall Term 2013

The role of women in international resistance acts as an organizational theme. An essential aspect of this is conceptualizing various forms of oppression-based on gender, race and class- in the context of the world system. 

POLS 851:

Global Distributive Justice

Margaret Moore

Fall Term 2013

This course discusses contemporary debates about the obligation of persons in wealthy countries to alleviate poverty among those in the developing world. The course addresses the proper currency of global justice, the source of the obligation of the rich and poor, and examines the criticisms that have been made. These inquiries require examining anew the basis of the nation state in the international order and the extent to which people are morally required to help those who are not fellow citizens.

POLS 853:

Topics in Political Theory: Inequality

Andrew Lister

Winter Term 2014

The purpose of this course is to examine the causes, consequences, and normative significance of  socio-economic inequality.  The course will begin with a survey of some classic debates about equality in normative political theory.  Should we care about equality as such, or only sufficiency, or should we give priority to the worst off?  What is the proper dimension in which we should be concerned about equality: wellbeing, resources, opportunity, capacity to function, etc.?  Next, the course will survey recent empirical work on the level, causes and consequences of social and economic inequality.  We will pay particular attention to the debates over Wilkinson and Pickett's The Spirit Leveland Michael Marmot's Whitehall study, discussed in The Status Syndrome.The course will conclude with a discussion of the political effects of economic inequality.

POLS 856: 
Debates in Contemporary Political Theory

Eleanor MacDonald

Winter Term 2014

An investigation into different theoretical perspectives on the issue of identity and the importance of these perspectives for the politics of identity. Theories of gender, race, class, nation, and sexual orientation, from a variety of perspectives, including Marxist, feminist, postmodern, and psychoanalytic theory.

POLS 860:

International Relations I

Wayne Cox

Fall Term 2013

This course is a comprehensive examination of the evolution and current state of the field of International Relations (IR).  It covers international theory, the structure of the international system, key concepts, readings from the canon, and themes in the study of IR such as war, security, foreign policy, the state, gender, global systems, and concepts of power.  This course also locates IR in relation to Global Political Economy (GPE) and other related fields of study.

POLS 862:

Topics in American Foreign Policy

David Haglund

Fall Term 2013

The course examines major trends in American foreign policy covering domestic as well as external variables in pre- and post-war administrations. Emphasis is placed on the USA's global role, the part it plays in international organizations and alliance systems, and the conflicts and controversies that characterize them.

POLS 880:

Gender and Politics

Margaret Little

Winter Term 2014

This course addresses the diverse and developing field of Gender and Politics in the discipline of Political Science. The focus will vary depending on the instructor, addressing topics such as: representation; feminist methodology; identity; gender and work; gender and citizenship; the politics of the family; queer theory; intersectionality of race, gender and class; and gender and globalization.

POLS 891:

Topics in Political Studies:

Interrogating the Aid Industry

and Corporate Power in

Global Development

 

Note: co-taught with DEVS 893

Susanne Soederberg

Winter Term 2014

Despite the insightful contributions of political economy approaches to our understanding of development, critical explorations of global aid industry, and the increasing and complex roles of (financial and non-financial) corporations, and (for-profit and non-profit) non-government organizations (NGOs) therein has been given far less attention. This seminar fills this gap in our knowledge by studying the ever-shifting and multifaceted terrain of global aid industry by interrogating the nature and origins of power and contestation. In doing so, we apply a wide variety of political economy lenses to examine key issues of the corporatization of the aid industry, including: the global aid regime and its emphasis on aid effectiveness, the rise of corporate social responsibility initiatives in development projects, the politics of global disaster and relief strategies, with particular focus on housing initiatives, and micro-lending and the financial inclusion agenda.

  Back to top
POLS 900: 
Methods of Political Studies

Oded Haklai / Andrew Lister

Fall Term 2013

This course covers approaches to the discipline, the philosophy of social science, and issues and problems in research design, culminating in presentation of a thesis proposal. Compulsory for doctoral students who have not already completed a similar graduate course and thesis stream M.A. students; also open to non-thesis stream master's students. Doctoral students who have completed a similar course will take another course as their sixth.
POLS 910: 
Field Course in Canadian Politics

Convenor:

Jonathan Rose

This course examines the literature in Canadian politics. The course will be taught be several members of the Department but coordinated by Professor Banting who will grade all assignments. Students are expected to read the assigned materials for each session and to participate actively in the discussions. Students are encouraged to question the approaches or assumptions employed in the study of Canadian politics, what research questions arise from the readings, whether the readings and topics chosen address the appropriate questions that political scientists should be addressing, and whether other approaches or methods would provide a more helpful way to evaluate Canadian politic
POLS 930: 
Field Course in Comparative Politics

Convenor:

Oded Haklai

The Field Course in Comparative Politics is designed to familiarize students with the main literature and debates in the field.  The emphasis of the sessions will be on key theoretical debates that have driven research, as well as on the methodological issues that arise in the study of any question.  This course should help students to acquire literacy in the main canonical works of comparative politics.
POLS 950: 
Field Course in Political Theory

Convenor:

Andrew Lister

The purpose of POLS 950 is to introduce graduate students to some of the main concepts and debates in recent political theory, and, for doctoral students, to provide the basis for the comprehensive exam in the field
POLS 960: 
Field Course in International Relations

Convenor:

Wayne Cox

This course is designed as an advanced survey of international relations as a subfield of political science. Its primary purpose is to help prepare doctoral candidates in Political Studies for the field examination in international relations.

POLS 980: 

Field Course in Gender and Politics 

Convenor:

Margaret Little

This course is designed as a survey of the diverse and developing field of Gender and Politics within the discipline of Political Science. It will also serve to introduce graduate students to the breadth of expertise in this field housed in the Department of Political Studies at Queen’s University. The course is specifically offered as background to the Gender and Politics graduate qualifying examination, with a view to preparation for advanced specialized research and/or university-level instructional qualification.

Back to top

*PDF files can be viewed using Adobe Reader.

Kingston, Ontario, Canada. K7L 3N6. 613.533.2000