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Queen's University
 
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A single interaction affects the way a child trusts and seeks information, Queen’s University study finds

Psychology professor Stanka Fitneva.

September 2, 2010
Seven-year-old children only need to interact with a person once to learn who to trust and seek information from, according to a study by Queen's University researchers.

"It shows that kids really pay attention to people's accuracy and they don't forget it, even after interacting with that person one time," says psychology professor Stanka Fitneva, who conducted the study with graduate student Kristen Dunfield.

The study tested adults, seven-year-olds and four-years-olds by asking a question and then having two people on a computer screen give a right and wrong answer.

When a second question was asked and participants were told they could only ask one person for the answer, the adults and seven year olds always chose to ask the person who previously gave the right answer. The result of four-year olds varied on the way the question was asked, showing that four year olds generally need more than a single encounter to affect the way they seek information from people.

 


 
 


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