Department of Psychology

Department of

Psychology

Department of

Psychology

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Lee Fabrigar

Photo of Lee Fabrigar

Professor

A.A., University of Maryland, 1986
B.A., Miami University, 1988
M.A., Ohio State University, 1991
Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1995

T: 613.533.6492
E: fabrigar@queensu.ca

319 Craine Hall
Psychology Department
Queen's University
Kingston, ON K7L 3N6

Research Interests

Academic Background:

A.A., University of Maryland, Munich Branch Campus, Munich, Federal Republic of Germany, 1986.
B.A., Psychology. Miami University, Oxford OH, 1988.
M.A., Psychology. The Ohio State University, Columbus OH, 1991.
Ph.D., Psychology. The Ohio State University, Columbus OH, 1995.

Research Interests:

Dr. Fabrigar’s primary research interests fall within the domain of attitude and persuasion research. Within this domain, his research has investigated the effects of attitude structure and social context in regulating the susceptibility of attitudes to persuasion and the impact of attitudes on behavior, judgment, and information processing.  His research has also explored methods of measuring attitudes and their underlying structural properties.  Other research interests include the psychological mechanisms underlying social influence tactics, the relationship between personality traits and the self, the role of attachment style in relationship processes, and methodological issues in the application of statistical methods (e.g., factor analysis and structural equation modeling) to psychological research.

Awards and Distinctions:

Elected to the Society for Multivariate Experimental Psychology, 2002.
Elected to the Society for Experimental Social Psychology, 2003.
Fellow of the Society for Experimental Social Psychology, 2009.
Fellow of the Midwestern Psychological Association, 2013.
Fellow of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, 2015.
Fellow for the Association for Psychological Science, 2015.

Winner of the Frank Knox Award for Teaching Excellence, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, 1999.
Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, Department of Psychology, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, 2005.
Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching, Department of Psychology, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, 2007, 2012, 2015.

Professional Service:

Consulting Editor, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 1998, 2000-2004
Consulting Editor, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 2006-2015
Consulting Editor, Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 2006-2016

Associate Editor, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 2003-2005
Co-Editor, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 2013-2016    

Panel Member, Psychosocial Sociocultural, and Behavioural Determinants of Health, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, 2004-2006
Panel Member, Insight Development Grant Committee, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, 2014.

Selected Publications

*Denotes past or current undergraduate or graduate student in the Fab Lab.


Fabrigar, L. R., & Wegener, D. T.  (2016).  Conceptualizing and evaluating the replication of research results.  Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 66, 68-80.

Fabrigar, L. R., & Wegener, D. T.  (2014). Exploring causal and noncausal hypotheses in nonexperimental data.  In H. T. Reis & C. M. Judd (Eds.), Handbook of research methods in social and personality psychology (2nd Ed, pp. 504-533).  New York: Cambridge University Press.

See, Y. H. M., Petty, R. E., & Fabrigar, L. R.  (2013). Affective-cognitive meta-bases versus structural bases predict processing interest versus efficiency.  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 39, 1111-1123.

*Refling, E. J., *Calnan, C., M., Fabrigar, L. R., MacDonald, T. K., *Johnson, V., & *Smith, S. M.  (2013). To partition or not to partition evaluative judgments: Comparing measures of structural ambivalence.  Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4, 387-394.

*Carter, A. M., Fabrigar, L. R., MacDonald, T. K., & *Monner, L. J.  (2013). Investigating the interface of the investment model and adult attachment theory.  European Journal of Social Psychology, 43, 661-672.

*Kredentser, M. S., Fabrigar, L. R., *Smith, S. M., & *Fulton, K.  (2012). Following what people think we should do versus what people actually do: Elaboration as a moderator of the impact of descriptive and injunctive norms.  Social Psychological and Personality Science, 3, 341-347.

Fabrigar, L. R., & Wegener, D. T.  (2012). Exploratory factor analysis.  New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

*Wasylkiw, L., Fabrigar, L. R., *Rainboth, S., Reid A., & Steen, C.  (2010). Neuroticism and the architecture of the self: Exploring neuroticism as a moderator of the impact of ideal self-discrepancies on emotion.  Journal of Personality, 78, 471-492.

Fabrigar, L. R., Wegener, D. T., & MacDonald, T. K.  (2010). Distinguishing between prediction and influence: Multiple processes underlying attitude-behavior consistency.  In C. R. Agnew, D. E. Carlston, W. G. Graziano, & J. R. Kelly (Eds.), Then a miracle occurs: Focusing on behavior in social psychological theory and research (pp. 162-185).  New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Fabrigar, L. R., & Wegener, D. T.  (2010). Attitude structure.  In R. F. Baumeister & E. J.  Finkel (Eds.), Advanced social psychology (pp. 177-216).  New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

*Paik, J. S., *MacDougall, B. L., Fabrigar, L. R., *Peach, J. M., & *Jellous, K. (2009).  Altering category level beliefs: The impact of level of representation at belief formation and belief disconfirmation. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 35, 1112-1125.

See, Y. H. M., Petty, R. E., & Fabrigar, L. R.  (2008). Affective and cognitive meta-bases of attitudes: Unique effects on information interest and persuasion.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94, 938-955.

*Smith, S. M., Fabrigar, L. R., *Powell, D. M., & *Estrada, M.  (2007). The role of information processing capacity and goals in attitude-congruent selective exposure effects.  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 33, 948-960.

Fabrigar, L. R., Petty, R. E., *Smith, S. M., & Crites, S. L.Jr.  (2006). Understanding knowledge effects on attitude-behavior consistency: The role of relevance, complexity, and amount of knowledge.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 90, 556-577.

Fabrigar, L. R., MacDonald, T. K., & Wegener, D. T.  (2005). The structure of attitudes.  In D. Albarracin, B. T. Johnson, & M. P. Zanna (Eds.), Handbook of attitudes and attitude change (pp. 79-124).  Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.