Please enable javascript to view this page in its intended format.

Queen's University
 

Sexual Health Research Laboratory
People in the Lab

Sexual Health Research Lab 2014-2015

Back from L to R: Amanda Shelley, Stephanie Gauvin, Megan McInnis, Robyn Jackowich, Taylor Katzel, Kaitlyn Meloche, Katrina Bouchard, Emma Dargie, Manya Singh, Jennifer Bossio
Front from L to R: Cara Chen, Shannon Coyle, Caroline Pukall, Jaclyn Cappell, Jessica Barr

Lab Director

Caroline Pukall

T: (613) 533-3200
F: (613) 533-2499

caroline.pukall@queensu.ca

Caroline Pukall

Associate Professor

B.A. (Psychology), McGill University, 1996
PhD. (Clinical Psychology), McGill University, 2003
 
Dr. Caroline Pukall received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from McGill University. She is currently Full Professor in the Department of Psychology and the Director of the Sex Therapy Service at the Psychology Clinic at Queen’s University. Caroline’s research lab—the Sexual Health Research Laboratory—brims with enthusiastic, collaborative, and keen students of all levels who work diligently on research projects examining various aspects of sexuality, including: vulvodynia (i.e., chronic genital pain in women), sexual difficulties (e.g., persistent genital arousal in women), male and female sexual arousal, women’s health issues (e.g., postpartum pain and sexuality), male circumcision, and various relationship constellations. She is lucky to have such a productive and lively lab, the activities of which are coordinated by her dynamic Research Associate, Shannon. Caroline is passionate about using multiple methodologies in her research and she has investigated numerous aspects of sexuality using brain imaging, psychophysics, psychophysiology, and blood flow imaging, all the while relating the findings of these methods to a variety of self-report measures. She places great importance on knowledge translation and clinically relevant research, ensuring that the results of her research have positive effects on members of the public through numerous direct and indirect channels. Caroline’s research has been funded by several organizations including the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the National Vulvodynia Association. Caroline is Associate Editor for Sexual Medicine Reviews and is on the editorial board of several journals, including The Archives of Sexual Behavior, The Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, and The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality. She is also currently co-chair of the Women’s Sexual Pain Disorders Committee of the International Consultation of Sexual Medicine.

 

Curriculum Vitae         Teaching



Research Associate

Shannon Coyle

T: (613) 533-3276
F: (613) 533-2499

shrl@queensu.ca

Shannon Coyle

B.Sc. (Life Science), Queen’s University, 2001
B.A.H (Psychology/Women’s Studies medial), Queen’s University, 2009
M.A. (Gender Studies), Queen’s University, 2011
 
Shannon is the research associate in the Sexual Health Research Lab in the Department of Psychology at Queen’s University, instructor of the online fall 2014 Human Sexuality course at Queen’s  University, and an adjunct professor at St. Lawrence College. Her research and teaching interests include gender and human sexuality, sex education in Canada, and health promotion and fitness.  After completing two years as a PhD student in Kinesiology and Health Studies at Queen’s University she decided to shift her focus and follow her passion to teach and conduct full-time research.  Prior to her graduate work, she gained 7 years of professional experience in the field of information technology; as the Chief Operating Officer of a coaching company for chiropractors; and as a marketing consultant and office administrator for a publishing company.


Curriculum Vitae         Teaching



Doctoral Students

Jennifer Bossio

T: (613) 533-3276

jennifer.bossio@queensu.ca

Jennifer Bossio

B.A.H (Psychology), McMaster University, 2008
M.Sc. (Clinical Psychology), Queen's University, 2011
PhD Candidate (Clinical Psychology), Queen's University, Present
 
Jenn is in the fourth year of her PhD in the Clinical Psychology program at Queen’s University, training as a research-practitioner. Her research program focuses on men and women’s sexual health and functioning. Specifically, she is exploring sexual correlates of male neonatal circumcision with the use of self-report and psychophysiological methods. Jenn’s clinical interests include evidence-based treatments of sex and relationship therapy, mood and anxiety disorders, and sleep issues. She is particularly interested in the integration of clinical psychology into interdisciplinary health care.


Curriculum Vitae

Katrina Bouchard

T: (613) 533-3276

8kb12@queensu.ca

Katrina Bouchard

B.Sc. (Psychology), Queen's University, 2012
M.Sc. (Clinical Psychology), Queen's University, 2014
PhD Student (Clinical Psychology), Queen's University, Present
 
Katrina is in the first year of her Ph.D. in the Clinical Psychology program at Queen's University. Her research focuses on female sexual arousal, including the measurement of genital arousal in women (e.g., vaginal and vulvar blood flow and vaginal lubrication). For her Master's thesis, Katrina measured blood flow in the vulva and vagina concurrently to examine the relationship between these two types of genital arousal and self-reported sexual arousal. Beyond her work in the lab, Katrina is the Co-President of the Association for Graduate Students in Psychology and participated in and won first place in the Queen's 5th Annual Health Care Team Challenge.


Curriculum Vitae

Jackie Cappell

T: (613) 533-3276

11jc83@queensu.ca

Jackie Cappell

B.A.H. (Psychology, Sociology), Dalhousie University, 2009
M.Sc. (Clinical Psychology), Queen's University, 2014
PhD Student (Clinical Psychology), Queen's University, Present
 
Jackie is in the first year of her Ph.D. in the Clinical Psychology program at
Queen's University. For her Master's thesis, Jackie investigated the role of birth-related physical, psychological, social, and relationship factors involved in persistent postpartum pain and postpartum sexual function. Her research involves biopsychosocial approaches to understanding pain and sexual function. When not working in the lab, Jackie can be found reading, biking, or doing crafts.

 

Curriculum Vitae

Emma Dargie

T: (613) 533-3276

5eed@queensu.ca

Emma Dargie

B.A.H (Clinical Psychology), Queen's University, 2009
M.Sc. (Clinical Psychology), Queen's University, 2011
PhD Candidate (Clinical Psychology), Queen's University, Present
 
Emma is in the fourth year of her Clinical Psychology PhD at Queen’s University. Her program of research is hedged in the assessment and diagnosis of chronic vulvar pain (i.e., vulvodynia), and translating the body of literature on vulvodynia into a form that is easily accessed by the public as well as health care professionals.  Part of her PhD includes the creation of a questionnaire that can be used to facilitate the process of diagnosis, and disseminating that questionnaire to be used for clinical and research purposes. Emma’s clinical interests include working with those who have mood and anxiety disorders, eating disorders, chronic pain, and sex or relationship issues, in addition to conducting cognitive assessments. Emma is a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholar.


Curriculum Vitae

Stéphanie Thibault Gagnon

T: (613) 533-3276

8st31@queensu.ca

Stéphanie Thibault-Gagnon

B.Sc. (Physical Therapy), McGill University, 2007
M.Sc. (Rehabilitation Science), Queen's University, 2011
PhD Candidate (Rehabilitation Science), Queen's University, Present
 
Stéphanie is in her fourth year of her Ph.D in the Rehabilitation Science program at Queen’s University. Her research work focuses on investigating pelvic floor muscle dysfunctions in women with chronic vulvar pain (i.e., vulvodynia) using novel assessment methods, including pelvic floor ultrasound imaging. As a practicing physical therapist, Stéphanie’s clinical focus is in the area of women’s pelvic and sexual health. She is passionate about her work both as a researcher and as a physical therapist. Stéphanie holds a Doctoral Training Award from the Fonds de recherche en Santé du Québec. She is also a past recipient of multiple awards including the Dr. Stanley C. Marinoff Career Development Award, granted by the National Vulvodynia Association, and of the Award for research advancing quality of care by the College of physiotherapists of Ontario.

Christine Tong

T: (613) 533-3276

tongc@queensu.ca

Christine Tong

B.A.H. (Psychology), Queen’s University, 1999
M.A. (Psychology – Brain, behavior & cognitive science), Queen’s University, 2001
Ph.D. Candidate (Psychology – Brain, behavior & cognitive science), Queen’s University, Present
 
Christine is completing her PhD requirements in the Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Science program at Queen’s University while working full time at the Cancer Research Institute.   She is currently involved in two distinct streams of research:  Medical decision-making and “Living Apart Together” (LAT) relationships.   As a member of the decision support team for Prostate Cancer Canada’s ASAP initiative (A survivorship action partnership), Christine is actively involved in the development of a decision support tool for early-stage prostate cancer patients.  Related to this work is her thesis project designed to investigate the effects of including patient testimonials in decision support tools.  Her second research focus is “Living Apart Together” relationships.  In particular, Christine is interested in how couples living apart fare on indicators of relationship success relative to their cohabiting counterparts, and also the factors that influence success in these two types of relationships.


Curriculum Vitae



Master's Students

Stéphanie Gauvin

T: (613) 533-3276

12SG78@queensu.ca

Stéphanie Gauvin

B.Sc. (Honours Psychology), Saint Mary’s University, 2013

M.Sc. Student (Clinical Psychology), Queen's University, Present


Stéphanie is in the first year of her MSc in the Clinical Psychology program at Queen’s University. Her primary research interests focus on how couples negotiate and navigate sexual challenges such as: differences in sexual likes and dislikes, sexual and bodily changes associated with breast cancer, and both male and female sexual dysfunction. Specifically, she is interested in exploring the association between different forms of partner responding to sexual challenges and sexual satisfaction. Stéphanie is also interested in analyzing different audience-targeted pornographic and erotic material.


Curriculum Vitae

Robyn Jackowich

T: (613) 533-3276

robyn.jackowich@queensu.ca

Robyn Jackowich

B.A. (Psychology), University of British Columbia, 2010
M.Sc. Student (Clinical Psychology), Queen's University


Robyn is in the first year of her M.Sc. in Clinical Psychology at Queen’s University and is excited to be joining the Sexual Health Research Lab. After completing her B.A. in psychology at the University of British Columbia (UBC), she worked as a study coordinator in the UBC Sexual Health Lab and the Vancouver Prostate Center’s Prostate Cancer Supportive Care Program. Her research interests include psychosocial and biological issues relating to sexual health and dysfunction, in particular vulvar pain conditions. She is also interested in the impact of sexual difficulties following prostate cancer treatments on men and their partners, mindfulness-based treatments for sexual concerns, and gender identity.


Curriculum Vitae






Past Graduate Students

Stéphanie Boyer (MSc, PhD in progress, Department of Psychology)
Reproductive health care experiences in women with chronic vulvar pain: Patient and physician perspectives 

Curriculum Vitae


Corrie Goldfinger (MSc, PhD in progress, Department of Psychology)
A randomized comparison of individual cognitive-behavioural therapy and pelvic floor physiotherapy in the treatment of provoked vestibulodynia

Curriculum Vitae
 

Katherine Sutton (Department of Psychology)
Assessing sensory functioning, psychosocial correlates, and brain activity in women with vulvodynia subtypes



Karen Blair,
PhD (Department of Psychology)
Perceived social support for relationships as a predictor of relationship well-being and mental and physical health in same-sex and mixed-sex relationships: A longitudinal investigation.



Evelyne Gentilcore-Saulnier (MSc, School of Rehabilitation Therapy, co-supervised with Dr. Linda McLean)
Investigating contractile behavior of the painful pelvic floor and effects of pelvic floor physiotherapy on pelvic floor muscle function in women with provoked vestibulodynia



Samantha Waxman PhD (Department of Psychology)
Examining female sexual arousal and female sexual arousal disorder from a multidimensional perspective



Kelly Smith PhD (Department of Psychology)
Investigating sensory and relationship functioning in women with vulvodynia



Current Research Assistants and Volunteers/Directed Lab Students

Shannon Coyle (Research Associate)

Amanda Shelley
Cara Chen
 


Current Undergraduate Honours Thesis Students





Past Undergraduate Honours Thesis Students

Katie Bartley:Male circumcision status: Effects on partners. (2013-4)

Erin Zadorozny: Sexual arousal in women with sexual arousal and desire difficulties (2013-4)
Marissa Walter: Effect of personality, experimental invasiveness, and compensation on willingness to participate in sexuality studies. (2012-3)

Lynita White: A model of sexual satisfaction and relationship satisfaction within attachment theory. (2012-3)
Jennifer Eshleman: The role and treatment of cognitive factors in provoked vestibulodynia (2011-2)

Maeve Wickham: The role of pain catastrophizing and pain anxiety on pelvic floor physiotherapy treatment outcomes in women with provoked vestibulodynia (2009-10)

Jennifer Brunet: The relationship between anxiety and sexual arousal in women with and without provoked vestibulodynia (2009-10)

Emma Dargie:
Sexual and relationship satisfaction, intimacy, love, and communication in long distance dating relationships. (2008-9)

Stephanie Taillefer: The relationship between partner-response style, general and pain-specific anxiety, and avoidance behaviour in women with provoked vestibulodynia (2008-9)

Chris Upton: Examination of female sexual arousal to specific erotic stimuli (2008-9)

Clare Devlin: The roles of body image, pain catastrophizing, pain severity, and coping in women with vulvar pain (2007-8)

Shaina Rosenrot: Pain anxiety, and sexual communication, satisfaction and esteem among women with provoked vestibulodynia (2007-8)

Kelsey Smart: The impact of dyadic ajustment on body image, body exposure, and sexual esteem in same- and other-sex partnered individuals (2007-8)

Katherine Alexander: The impact of outness on health, relationship satisfaction, and sexual satisfaction among LGB men and women (2006-7)

Laura Leong: General health status and sexual and relationship satisfaction among women with vulvar vestibultitis syndrome (2006-7)

Christina Yager: Relationship and sexual satisfaction among married and cohabiting heterosexual and same-sex couples (2005-6)

Nina Mafrici: The influence of sexual orientation on the relationship between body image and sexual satisfaction (2005-6)

Deanne Simms: Spouse solicitousness and couple functioning in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (2004-5)

 

Return to top

Kingston, Ontario, Canada. K7L 3N6. 613.533.2000