School of Graduate Studies

School of Graduate Studies
School of Graduate Studies

Classics

Normally, a minimum of six half courses will be offered each year from the list below. Course offerings for the upcoming academic year will be posted on the Classics website in July.

Most Classics graduate courses are half-year courses (3.0 units).  However, the archaeology practicum courses (CLAS-808, CLAS-809, CLAS-810) which are offered in the summer term are weighted at 6.0 units.

Only CLAS-800 and CLAS-802* are offered every year.

GREK-820*     Greek Poetry I: Epic     
Detailed study of selections from the works of Homer and Hesiod.

GREK-821*     Greek Poetry II: Lyric     
Selections of Lyric, elegiac and iambic poetry from Archilochus to Pindar.

GREK-822*     Greek Drama     
Detailed study of one play of Aischylos, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes or Menander.

GREK-823*     Greek Historians     
An intensive study of Greek historical writings, with special emphasis on Herodotus, Thucydides and Xenophon.

GREK-824*     Greek Rhetoric     
One speech from Lysias, one from Demosthenes' corpus.

GREK-830*,831*,832*,833*     Reading Courses     
Reading of any Greek author or authors approved by the Department. Informal instruction. Examination on ability to translate only.

LATN-810*     Latin Drama     
A study of the work of Plautus, or Terence, or Seneca, and its position within the classical comedic or tragic tradition.

LATN-811*     Latin Rhetoric     
An intensive study of the traditions of ancient rhetoric with readings in Cicero's rhetorical works and orations.

LATN-812*     Latin Poetry I: Epic     
A study of Vergil's Aeneid, or Ovid's Metamorphoses, or Lucan's Civil War, or Statius' Thebaid, and its position within the Latin epic tradition.

LATN-813*     Latin Poetry II: Lyric, Elegy, Didactic, and Satire     
A study of a major non-epic work or genre, such as Vergil's Georgics; Horace's Odes, Satires, or Epistles; or the elegiac poetry of Propertius, Tibullus, or Ovid.

LATN-814*     Roman Historians     
An intensive study of Roman historical writings, with readings in Sallust, Livy and Tacitus.

LATN-815*     Latin Epigraphy     
A lecture course examining the categories of Latin inscriptions, the archaisms, formulae and abbreviations. Sample inscriptions will be chosen from the earliest to later Imperial times.

LATN-830*,831*,832*,833*     Reading Courses     
Reading of any Latin author or authors approved by the Department. Informal instruction. Examination on ability to translate only.

CLAS-800*     Research Forum I     
Discussion of the principal research problems and methodologies in the field of Classical studies. Presentation of faculty research and visiting speakers. Weekly meetings.

CLAS-802*     Research Forum II     
Discussion of the principal research problems and methodologies in the field of Classical studies. Bi-weekly meetings and final presentation of graduate students in conference format.

CLAS-804*     Topography of Athens     
The growth of Athens from the final Neolithic period to Late Antiquity based on archaeological, literary, epigraphical evidence. (May be offered jointly with CLST-404*. There are additional requirements for students at the graduate level but these are determined and discussed at the onset of the course.)

CLAS-805*     Topography of Rome     
The growth of Rome from the Neolithic period to Late Antiquity based on archaeological, literary, epigraphical evidence. (May be offered jointly with CLST-405*. There are additional requirements for students at the graduate level but these are determined at the onset of the course.)

CLAS-808     Archaeology Fieldwork Practicum I     
An intensive six-week study of archaeological methods and interpretation while participating in a fieldwork project run by a member of the Classics Department. Students will actively contribute to the project with scientific reports and stratigraphic records. COST: students are expected to pay their own travel costs and a course fee to be determined. (6.0 credit units)

CLAS-809     Archaeology Fieldwork Practicum II     
An intensive study of archaeological methods and interpretation at a fieldwork project in Italy under the supervision of a member of the Classics Department. Students will actively contribute to the project with scientific reports and stratigraphic records. COST: students are expected to pay their own travel costs and a course fee to be determined. Spring/Summer term or Spring term or Summer term. (6.0 credit units)

CLAS-810     Archaeological Fieldwork Practicum III     
This course is an intensive study of archaeological and cultural heritage recording methods at a fieldwork site in the Balkans under the supervision of a member of the Department of Classics. COSTS: Students are expected to pay their own travel and accommodation costs. (6.0 credit units)

CLAS-814*     Roman Archaeology     
This course is an intensive study of topics of Roman archaeology. Topics will vary according to the instructor,including, but not limited to, settlement pattern and land use, urban planning, architecture, visual art public and private, both in Italy and the provinces from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity.

CLAS-815*     Archaeology of the Roman Army     
The goal of this course is to familiarize graduate students with the wide range of materials available for studying the Roman army. The Roman army constitutes one of the most documented groups from the ancient world. Forts, inscriptions, and military paraphernalia have been found in all parts of the former Roman Empire. A rich collection of ancient literary texts relating to Roman military practices has also survived. By studying this material, students will learn not just about the Roman army, but about the range of materials available for studying the ancient world in general. Fall or Winter Term.

CLAS-820*     Topics in Classical Studies I     
Intensive study of a special topic in the Greek and Roman World from the Dark Ages to Late Antiquity.

CLAS-821*     Topics in Classical Studies II     
Intensive study of a special topic in the Greek and Roman World from the Dark Ages to Late Antiquity.

CLAS-822*     Greek Archaeology I     
This course focuses on architecture and the development of town planning in ancient Greece. Various building types, both sacred and secular, will be studied.

CLAS-823*     Greek Archaeology II     
This course focuses on art in ancient Greece, emphasizing the post-Bronze Age. Classification and development of various styles in art from the so-called Dark Age to the Hellenistic period.

CLAS 824*     Archaeology of the Western Greeks     
The course deals with the Greek colonies of the Western Mediterranean, and especially Southern Italy, from their foundation to the Roman conquest. The development of a peculiar “Western Greek” experience and its contribution to the Greek culture will be investigated by examining especially significant case studies. The distinctive and multifaceted milieu of the Greek “Western frontier” and the long term relationships with the local population of Italy, including Etruscans and Romans, will be one of the main topics. Fall/Winter Term.  Prerequisite: Permission of Course Instructor required in advance.

CLAS-825*     Etruscan and Italic Archaeology     
This course is an intensive study of the archaeology of the Etruscans and the other cultures of Italy until the end of the 1st century BC, with the exclusion of the Greek colonies. Topics will vary according to the instructor.

CLAS-832*     Greek History I: Archaic/Classical     
Specialized study of a topic in either period of Greek History.

CLAS-833*     Greek History II: Hellenistic     
Specialized study of a topic in the Hellenistic era.

CLAS-842*     Roman History I:  Early Rome and Republic     
Specialized study of a topic in the history of Rome from the urban formation to the end of the Republic.

CLAS-843*     Roman History II: Empire     
Specialized study of a topic in the history of the Roman Empire.

CLAS-850*     Comparative Literature I     
An introduction to comparative literary studies as currently practiced with particular emphasis on the relevance to such studies of contemporary theories of literature and criticism. (Given jointly with ENGL-950*, FRAN-950*.)

CLAS-851*     Comparative Literature II     
Specialized study in comparative context of particular authors, themes, movements, periods, genres, literary forms or some combination of these elements. (Given jointly with ENGL-951*, FRAN-951*, GRMN-890*.)

CLAS-860*     Ancient Science     
The course explores Greek and Roman approaches to understanding the natural world. The course will introduce students to issues in the ancient sciences by examining in detail a group of related ancient texts, both in terms of scientific content, as well as intellectual and cultural contexts. Themes will be developed with an eye to contemporary issues in political and social history, and to the history and philosophy of science and technology. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Instructor required in advance.

CLAS-898     Master's Essay Research     

CLAS-899     Master's Thesis Research