School of Graduate Studies

School of Graduate Studies
School of Graduate Studies

Industrial Relations

 NOTE: All Analytical and Research Skills Seminars are 1.0 credit unit in weight.  MIR-895 is 1.5 credit units in weight.  Other courses are 3.0 credit units in weight and are designated with *.

MIR-801-809, 811-819     Analytical and Research Skills Seminar     
These seminars are designed to provide students with critical analytical, research, and interpersonal skills required of Human Resources and Labour Relations professionals in the workplace. Each seminar meets over a four-week period, and students are required to take three seminars which together will be considered a half-course. Students also have the option of taking three additional seminars, which may be counted as an elective credit. Students will not be permitted to take more than six seminars. Students who wish to drop a seminar must do so before the second scheduled class or with the permission of the instructor. The seminars are:

MIR-801     Business Skills:  accounting, finance, etc. (Seminar; 1.0 credit units).
Not offered 2017-18.    

MIR-802    Change Management Skills: team building, stress management, dealing with difficult people, etc.
Not offered 2017-18.     

MIR-803     Quantitative Skills: regression, t-tests, ANOVA, etc. (Seminar; 1.0 credit units).
Not offered 2017-18.

MIR-804    Qualitative Skills: interviews, case study, and other methods. (Seminar; 1.0 credit units).
Not offered 2017-18.   

MIR-805     Labour Relations Skills: costing agreements, grievance handling, negotiations, etc.(Seminar; 1.0 credit units).  
Not offered 2017-18.   

MIR-806     Human Resource Management Skills: opinion surveys, job diagnostic skills etc.(Seminar; 1.0 credit units).  

MIR-807    Strategic Bargaining and Workplace Change (Seminar; 1.0 credit units).  
Not offered 2017-18. 

MIR-808    Team Skills     (Seminar; 1.0 credit units).
Not offered 2017-18.    

MIR-809    Mediation Skills (Seminar; 1.0 credit units).  

MIR-810*    Unions and Collective Bargaining    
The purpose of the course is to develop a critical understanding of the institutions of unionism and collective bargaining, their rationale, policies and programs, and their effects on workers, organizations, and the society. The course will be taught in a comparative U.S./Canadian context with an emphasis on workplace change. (3.0 credit units)

MIR-811     Occupational Health and Safety   (Seminar; 1.0 credit units).

MIR-812 to MIR-818  Skills Seminars (all are 1.0 credit units in weight).
These seminars may be offered from time to time based on faculty availability and student interest.

MIR-819     Labour Arbitration Moot (Seminar; 1.0 credit units).
This skills seminar examines the process of grievance, arbitration and dispute settlement under collective agreements as well as the central role of arbitration in the collective bargaining relationship under Canadian labour statutes. Students will participate in mock arbitration hearings. The areas to be explored include, but are not limited to, pre-arbitration procedures, the arbitration tribunal, the jurisdiction of the arbitrator, the arbitration hearing, and selected issues in grievance determination.

MIR-820*     IR and Labour Law (two terms)     
This course addresses the fundamentals of the law governing the individual employment relationship and the collective bargaining relationship; rights of the employee and employer at common law, and their modification by minimum standards statutes and human rights legislation; the development of contemporary collective bargaining legislation; the certification process; unfair labour practices; the duty to bargain; the collective agreement and its administration through arbitration. The arbitration and adjudication process will also be studied, including such topics as powers of arbitrators and adjudicators and evidentiary issues. Students will have an opportunity to perform in mock arbitrations and adjudications.(3.0 credit units) Not offered 2017-18.
EXCLUSIONS: MIR-823 and MIR-824.

MIR-823*     IR and Labour Law I     
This course addresses the fundamentals of the law governing the individual employment relationship and the collective bargaining relationship; rights of the employee and employer at common law, and their modification by minimum standards statutes and human rights legislation; the development of contemporary collective bargaining legislation; the certification process; unfair labour practices and the duty to bargain. (3.0 credit units)
EXCLUSION: MIR-820

MIR-824*     IR and Labour Law II     
This course addresses the fundamentals of the collective agreement and its administration through arbitration. The arbitration and adjudication process will also be studied, including such topics as powers of arbitrators and adjudicators and evidentiary issues. Students will have an opportunity to perform in mock arbitrations and adjudications. (3.0 credit units)
EXCLUSION: MIR-820

MIR-825*     Human Rights Law in the Workplace     
The focus of this course is to provide students with the tools required to create and maintain a culture of human rights in the workplace. Through the use of case studies, students will learn how to apply legal principles and law to develop practical solutions to the challenges they are sure to face. (3.0 credit units)

MIR-826*     Advanced Topics in Labour Law     
This course is an advanced topics seminar providing contemporary perspectives on labour law. The course is intended to explore specific aspects of labour law that are relevant to industrial relations in depth. Specific topics may vary from year to year, as issues change and different instructors are involved. (3.0 credit units) Not offered 2017-18.

MIR-830*     Human Resource ManagementThis course will familiarize students with the basic responsibilities of the human resources function in organizations. The course covers topics such as strategic planning, job analysis, recruitment, selection, training and development, career planning, performance appraisal, compensation and international HRM. Students will learn about the various tools and techniques available to human resource professionals (such as environmental scanning, delphi methods and transition probability matrices, performance appraisal instruments, selection techniques, job evaluation methods, and some of the various applications of needs analysis) through the use of lectures, case analyses, student presentations, and the text book with supplemental readings. (3.0 credit units)

MIR-840*     Labour Economics and Industrial Relations     
This course examines contemporary labour market behaviour and processes and considers some of the emerging labour market issues and policies that are relevant to the study of industrial relations. The approach is to relate theory and empirical research from labour economics to industrial relations and institutional analyses. A selection of major topics that are typically covered include: the demand and supply for labour; human capital investments; contracts and compensation; unions and their impacts; and labour market discrimination and related public policy; and NAFTA related implications. (3.0 credit units)

MIR-841*     Contemporary Labour Policies     
This course provides a basic overview of the major purposes and elements of current Canadian labour policy and emerging challenges in the context of changing external and internal environments. The three major areas of labour policy studied include regulations related to labour relations, labour standards, and labour markets in both the public and the private sectors. Among key areas studied include legislation and programs related to labour relations, pay equity, occupational health and safety, employment standards, worker compensation, unemployment insurance, as well as broader policy programs such as the federal sectoral councils program for skills development and adjustment. Although the main focus of the course is on Canada, aspects of North American or global developments relevant to Canadian labour policy will also be reviewed. (3.0 credit units)

MIR 850*    Organizational Behavior
This course applies theories and methods from the behavioral sciences to the analysis of organizations. Students are introduced to classical and contemporary theories of organizational behavior at the individual, interpersonal, and organizational levels, with a particular emphasis on identifying evidence-based solutions to organizational problems in the context of employment relations. (3.0 credit units)

MIR 851*     Relationships in Organizations     
The purpose of this course is to create better understanding of the importance of relationships in organizations.  Using a socio-psychological approach, the course will focus on topics central to relationship formation including social perception and cognition, attitudes and persuasion as well as inter-personal attraction and influence.  Among the topics to be covered include attachment theory, social identity, social networks, organizational compassion, emotions, politics and influence tactics, diversity, harassment. (3.0 credit units).

MIR 852*     Leadership In Organizations     
This course examines theories and research findings from the behavioral sciences that are relevant to leadership and the influence process in groups and organizations. Topics may include personality, situational factors, intergroup processes, interpersonal perception as well as the motivation to both lead and follow.  The course also explores the implications of leadership training, organization development, and action research. (3.0 credit units) Not offered 2017-18.

MIR-860*     Advanced Topics in Employment     
This course is an advanced topics seminar providing contemporary perspectives on employment relations, personnel management and organizational behaviour. The course is intended to explore selected topics in these areas in depth.  Private and public sector industrial relations issues may be explored. Topics and instructors will vary from year to year. (3.0 credit units) Not offered 2017-18.

MIR-870*     Contract Administration     
An advanced topics course that explores the management and application of the collective agreement post—negotiation. This course examines the link between contract administration, the bargaining environment, and issues brought forward for collective bargaining. Duty of fair representation, successor rights, bargaining history, and language—building, among other topics, will be considered.(3.0 credit units)  Not offered 2017-18.

MIR-871*     Public Sector Human Resource Management     
This course examines the theory and practice of HR management in the public sector, the course will include contemporary developments in human resource management and their applicability to the public sector.  Topics may include; principles of public sector human resource management; defining distinctive characteristics of public sector HR; key HR policies and practices; the impact of restructuring; HR issues in the context of managing change.  The course will cover human resource management policies and practices in the broader public sector, including the public service, education, health, and municipal services. (3.0 credit units) Not offered 2017-18.

MIR-875*     Finance and Accounting for HR/LR  
This course provides an introduction to the basic principles and skills in accounting and finance that are relevant to employment relations specialists. Topic areas may vary from year to year but typically include financial concepts, statements and tools, principles of accounting, budgeting processes, financial forecasting, costing and reporting and the regulatory regime. (Offered online or on-campus). (3.0 credit units) Not offered 2017-18.

MIR-880*     Compensation     
This course examines the basic components of compensation systems (i.e., compensation objectives, job hierarchies, forms of pay, salary survey, etc.). A Canadian text is used that combines economic, sociological and psychological approaches to the study and design of pay systems. The course uses a detailed description of a hypothetical organization and a problem-oriented teaching method to explore topics such as the relationship between compensation systems and firm performance, and the tradeoffs between internal and external equity in the design of compensation systems. (3.0 credit units) Not offered 2017-18.

MIR-885*     Industrial Relations in the Global Economy     
This course develops a critical appreciation of the role of industrial relations in a global economic environment. The emphasis is on providing an understanding of the nature and scope of adjustments and adaptations in labour-management institutions and relationships required to deal with international competitive pressures, focusing on strategic links between HR/LR and competitiveness, the Japanese challenge, evolving management approaches and strategies, union responses and the labour agenda, and restructuring experience in key Canadian industries. (3.0 credit units) Not offered 2017-18.

MIR-886*     Negotiations, Conflict Resolution and Workplace Behaviour     
The object of this course is to develop industrial relations and human resource expertise including negotiation, conflict resolution and facilitation skills for those who will be employed in line, staff, or union positions in the public or private sectors. The course deals specifically with negotiation strategy and behaviour, labour and management attitudes and relationships, conflict and cooperation, methods of conflict resolution and facilitation, workplace innovations, strategic choice in IR/HR policy, new directions in IR/HR, and in the new roles of staff and line management in the high performance workplace. (3.0 credit units)

MIR-887*     Management of Change     
Management of change is designed to acquaint participants with the issues, techniques, and strategies for the management of change. The first part of the course concentrates on developing expertise in predicting relevant changes in the organization's task environment and making sure that change initiatives are in harmony with that environment. Techniques for environmental scanning and forecasting will be explored and useful models analysed. Students will also discuss and make presentations on current issues such as employee ownership, team based management, mergers and acquisitions, and organizational renewal. The second part of the course will focus on implementation. By course end, participants will understand the techniques for creating a need to change, managing resistance and applying change models to various industries and situations. (3.0 credit units) Not offered 2017-18.

MIR-888*     Advanced Topics in Labour Relations     
The course is an advanced topics seminar providing contemporary perspectives on labour relations. The course is intended to explore specific aspects of labour relations in depth. Private and public sector labour relations issues may be explored. Specific topics may vary from year to year, as issues change and different instructors are involved. (3.0 credit units) Not offered 2017-18.

MIR-889*     Advanced Topics in Human Resources Management     
The course is an advanced topics seminar providing contemporary perspectives on human resources management. The course is intended to explore specific aspects of human resources management in depth. Private and public sector human resource issues may be explored. Specific topics may vary from year to year, as issues change and different instructors are involved. (3.0 credit units)

MIR-891*,892*     Directed Special Studies     
The purpose of the directed special studies/reading course is to provide additional flexibility in the MIR program to enable students to pursue in-depth study of a topic/subject relating to industrial relations and human resources management that is not covered by existing course offerings. The scope of this course will be arranged by the student in consultation with the instructor. Although the exact course format and requirements will depend on the nature of the subject area and on the discretion of the instructor, the following guidelines may be helpful: the minimum workload for the course is the same as required for a normal course; the student is normally required to undertake a review of the literature, including an annotated bibliography of the subject covered by the course; the student is normally required to write at least one major paper (minimum 20 typed pages or 5000 words in length) as a requirement for the course. The course is available only under special circumstances and with the permission of the Director. This course may be taken in any one of the three terms, but it can only be taken once during the MIR program.(3.0 credit units)

MIR-895     Analytical Methods for HR MIIR     
This course focuses on the methods used to collect, assess, and evaluate industrial relations related qualitative and quantitative data and information in a variety of contexts. Example topics covered include designing and administering workforce surveys (including interviews and focus groups), compiling, analyzing, and presenting organizational data, and analyzing labour market survey data. (1.5 credit  units.) Not offered 2017-18.

MIR-897*     Analytical Methods in Industrial Relations     
This course introduces students to research methods and tools used in the study of industrial relations. The course includes selected topics related to the application of labour economics, human resources management, organizational behaviour, and labour law approaches to the analysis of industrial relations. Specific topics and emphasis vary according to the instructor. (3.0 credit units)

MIR-898   Research Project     
Written under the direction of a faculty supervisor and normally about 50 pages in length, the research essay provides students with the opportunity to undertake independent research of an IR/HR issue or a case study of an organization and to develop the ability to express their ideas in an organized and literate form. Preliminary work is normally completed in the winter term and research and writing conducted during the spring/summer term. Counselling for the research essay (choice of an appropriate topic, selection of a supervisor, etc.) is provided by the School. Every effort is made to inform students about the research interests and activities of faculty members and associates and to encourage them to undertake topics related to these. The written essay will be examined by a committee composed of the supervisor, and one other member of the faculty of the School or a related department. (offered based on supervisory availability).(6.0 credit units)