School of Graduate Studies

School of Graduate Studies
School of Graduate Studies

Management - Smith School of Business

NOTES:

  1. Students cannot repeat the 800/900 level courses and the same with the 900 level courses if it is cross listed.
  2. With the exception of MGMT-898 and MGMT-999, all courses listed with an asterisk (*) are 3.0 credit units.  Course weights other than 3.0 credit units  are as listed in the course's descriptions (normally 1.5 credit units).

        
MSc COURSES

MGMT-800*     Statistics I     
Topics in this course may include, but are not limited to, univariate analysis, bivariate analysis, multiple linear regression, and analysis of variance. Fall. P. Dacin.

MGMT-801     Introduction to Research Methodology     
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the context and traditions of knowledge generation in the social sciences in general, and academic business research in a business school context in particular. This course will encourage students to transcend the technical details of their respective research paradigms so as to position themselves as business school researchers capable of contributing meaningful knowledge to broader academic, business, and societal audiences. Guided by what it means to have a mindset of intellectual curiosity in the social sciences and business school context, this course will tackle questions such as, what it means to be driven by a scientific curiosity; how do we define or construct knowledge in academic business research and how does one's individual research contribute; what are the norms and traditions of being a valuable contributor of knowledge in academic business research? The goal of this course is to enable students to situate their current and forthcoming acquisition of in-depth skills in their research discipline into the mindset of researchers driven by intellectual curiosity seeking to contribute meaningful knowledge in the context and traditions of academic business research. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.(1.5 credit units). Fall.D. Thornton

MGMT-802     Qualitative Research Method Design     
This course will provide students with the foundations of qualitative research techniques. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, observational field research, narratives, case histories, interviewing, principles of action research and grounded theory. The equivalent of at least one session of the 6 will be dedicated to ethical considerations associated with the qualitative methods. (1.5 credit units). Winter. T. Thomas

MGMT-803     Experimental Research Method Design     
This course will teach the fundamentals of experimental design for the study of human behaviour including, but not limited to, experimental design considerations; assessment of reliability and validity; the equivalent of at least one session of the 6 will be dedicated to ethical considerations associated with experimental design. (1.5 credit units). Fall. J. Barling

MGMT-804     Survey Research Method Design     
This course will provide students with the foundations of survey (field) research method design. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, sample design, execution, and estimation; alternative sample designs and modes of data collection; the effect of question structure, wording, and context on respondent behaviour; the equivalent of at least one session of the 6 will be dedicated to ethical considerations associated with the survey method. (1.5 credit units). Winter. S. Staples

MGMT-805*     History of Strategic Thought     
This course provides a foundation in strategy and organizations by focusing on classic readings and approaches to the field of strategic management. The principal objective is to acquaint students with dominant ideas and a historical context for understanding the evolution of the field. The aim of the course will be to examine a number of perspectives, consider the strengths and weaknesses of each, and to look at the comparative ability of these models to explain a variety of organizational phenomena. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-806*     Strategy Process     
This course provides an introduction to research on the process and practice of strategy making. The objective of the course is to survey major theoretical debates and empirical works that have considered the strategy making process from different conceptual perspectives and levels of analysis. Topics covered include the routines and tools supporting strategy practice, strategy emergence, strategy implementation and evolution, sensemaking and enactment of strategic change, strategy diffusion across organizations, and institutional and environmental influences on strategy making. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-810*     Accounting I - Financial Accounting Research     
Elaborating on the themes in Introduction to Accounting Research Markets this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in financial accounting. (Crossed with MGMT-910*). M. Welker.

MGMT-811*     Management Accounting Research     
This seminar provides a broad overview of contemporary research in management accounting. Emphasis is placed on competing theories of the role of management accounting in organizations and society, as well as the issues and problems surrounding the implementation of management accounting techniques in practice. A background in traditional cost and management accounting techniques is assumed.

MGMT-813     Introduction to Accounting Research - Markets     
This course will provide an intensive introduction to principal themes in capital markets research in accounting. (1.5 credit units). Crossed with MGMT-913). Fall. D. Thornton.

MGMT-814     Introduction to Accounting Research – Experimental       
This course will provide an intensive introduction to principal themes in experimental behavioral research in accounting.(1.5 credit units).(Crossed with MGMT-914). Fall. S. Salterio

MGMT-815     Introduction to Accounting Research – Field     
This course will provide an intensive introduction to the principal themes in qualitative methodological research in accounting.(1.5 credit units)(Crossed with MGMT-915). Fall. B. Malsch

MGMT-821*     Capital Markets, Theory and Empirics     
This course covers the theory and empirics related to capital markets research and the pricing of assets.  Possible topics include characteristics of financial asset returns, tests of market efficiency, asset pricing models, and market microstructure. (Crossed with MGMT-921*) Fall. R. Riordan

MGMT-822*     Corporate Finance, Theory and Empirics     
This course will develop an overall perspective of corporate financial decisions through an integrated coverage of the most important topics of corporate finance. Topics may include theory of the firm, capital structure, dividend policy, corporate governance, and corporate restructuring. (Crossed with MGMT-922*) Winter. E. Dudley.

MGMT-840     Marketing Strategy and Management I     
The Marketing Strategy and Management I and II seminars survey theories and frameworks associated with practice of marketing as seen through the eyes of academic researchers. Course readings focus on topics related to marketing strategy and marketing management. Marketing strategy consists of the knowledge, concepts and processes that allow firms to evolve and survive in a competitive environment including, the analysis of markets, the allocation of resources for the creation of superior customer value and the creation of a competitive advantage. Marketing management consists of those decisions that translate strategic goals into market-based actions typically through implementing various elements of the marketing mix. In addition to the embodiment of a market/customer focus and the understanding and management of key relationships, the application of marketing strategy also ensures that an organization has the structure and processes that allow it to deliver superior benefits and respond in an appropriate and timely manner to change. (Crossed with MGMT-940) (1.5 credit units). Fall. P. Dacin

MGMT-841     Marketing Strategy and Management II     
The Marketing Strategy and Management I and II seminars survey theories and frameworks associated with practice of marketing as seen through the eyes of academic researchers. Course readings focus on topics related to marketing strategy and marketing management. Marketing strategy consists of the knowledge, concepts and processes that allow firms to evolve and survive in a competitive environment including, the analysis of markets, the allocation of resources for the creation of superior customer value and the creation of a competitive advantage. Marketing management consists of those decision that translate strategic goals into market-based actions typically through implementing various elements of the marketing mix. In addition to the embodiment of a market/customer focus and the understanding and management of key relationships, the application of marketing strategy also ensures that an organization has the structure and processes that allow it to deliver superior benefits and respond in an appropriate and timely manner to change. (Crossed with MGMT-941)(1.5 credit units). Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-842     Consumer Behaviour I     
This course seeks to enhance students' appreciation of the interdisciplinary and varied methodological nature of the field by providing an overview of issues concerned with "consumption," in a broad sense, as well as individual level consumer behavior, information processing and consumer decision-making. Topics include sociological and cultural influences on consumers, influences on how consumers interpret and respond to marketing phenomena, and psychological and psycho-social influences on consumer choice and decision processes. (Crossed with MGMT-942)(1.5 credit units). Fall. L. Ashworth

MGMT-843     Consumer Behaviour II                               
This course extends Consumer Behaviour I by expanding upon the key theoretical perspectives within the discipline of consumer behavior introduced in that course, as well as introducing additional areas of behavioural research not covered in CB I. In both seminars, the focus is on the applicability of behavioral theories and methodologies in the pursuit of a well-developed understanding of the consumption process.(Crossed with MGMT-943)(1.5 credit units). Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-844     Consumer Culture Theory I     
This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research. (Crossed with MGMT-944)(1.5 credit units). Winter. T. Thomas

MGMT-846     Consumer Culture Theory II     
This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research. (Crossed with MGMT-946)(1.5 credit units) Winter. J. Handelman

MGMT-847*     Research Development I     
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an appreciation of the research process and the broader academic career. Through a series of workshops, lectures, and roundtable discussions, students will develop an understanding of the professional expectations of an academic career, including an appreciation for the academic culture that includes, among other things, critical review processes. Students will learn the central role of theory in the research process and they will start to develop the discipline of effective academic writing that they can apply to their Summer Research project. Students will begin the course by sharing their initial research interests. In workshop fashion, students will come to develop this research interest throughout the course.  (Crossed with MGMT-947*). Fall/Winter. J. Handelman/P. Dacin

MGMT-850*     Foundations of Research in Organizational Behaviour     
The purpose of the course is to introduce you to the process of theory building in the field of organizational behaviour.  The course examines several prominent theories in the field and explores recent evidence that assesses central claims made by the theory.  The course also provides opportunities to develop skills in theory building. (Crossed with MGMT-950*). Fall. W. Cooper

MGMT-851*     Seminar in Micro-Organizational Behaviour     
The aim of this course is to examine the individual in the organization. Topics include the nature, development and consequences of different forms of leadership, work and well-being, organizational commitment, trust in management, organizational justice, absenteeism and withdrawal from the organization, workplace safety, motivation, and job design.(Crossed with MGMT-951*). Fall. J. Barling

MGMT-860*     Deterministic Operations Research Models     
This course reviews and extends deterministic operations research model formulation, solution, and applications. Topics may include linear, non-linear, and integer programming, dynamic programming, spreadsheet modelling, network and transportation models, and project management models. (Crossed with MGMT-960*). Fall. M. Thompson

MGMT-861*     Probabilistic Operations Research Models     
This course reviews the formulation, solution, and application of a range of probabilistic modelling techniques. Topics may include inventory models, queueing, simulation, decision analysis, Markov models, forecasting, and stochastic dynamic programming. (Crossed with MGMT-961*). Winter. M. Nediak

MGMT-865*     Analysis of Supply Chains           
In this course we will explore modern analytical approaches to optimization in production and supply chain systems. Topics may include production and inventory control, process control, location analysis, sustainability, and integration of supply chains, including game-theoretic approaches. (Crossed with MGMT-965*)

MGMT-870*     Foundations of MIS I     
This course begins to survey the major research areas in the field, including the design, implementation, use, and management of information systems within organizations. Its purpose is to expose students to the breadth of the field, by analyzing both the classic and current literature. For each area, we will examine the predominant theoretical perspectives, research methodologies, and analytical techniques.(Crossed with MGMT-970*). Fall. J. Webster

MGMT-871*     Foundations of MIS II     
This course continues with the survey of major research areas begun in MGMT-870. Again, for each area, we will examine the predominant theoretical perspectives, research methodologies, and analytical techniques. An emphasis will be placed on students developing their own research expertise and plans: students will learn how to design, conduct, evaluate, and present good research in the MIS area. (Crossed with MGMT-971*). Winter. K. Greenaway

MGMT-882*     Economics of Organizations     
This course discusses elements of the economics of organizational design and decision processes. Using concepts and techniques from applied microeconomics, it provides an analysis of organizational form, structure, and boundaries. Examples are drawn from the literature to illustrate the theoretical concepts and to demonstrate how they can be used to predict organizational performance and aid in changing organizations effectively. (Crossed with MGMT-982) Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-883*     Survey of Economics of Technology     
This course surveys the main issues in the Economics of Technology and presents some of the seminal papers in the area. A major goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the nature of the forces driving competitive interaction between technology-based firms. Topics covered include: diffusion of innovations, technology strategy, managing R&D, patents, licensing, and the financial evaluation of new technologies. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-884*     Economics of Technological Innovation     
This course provides an understanding of the economics of technological change and thus the foundations for technology strategy. Throughout the course we study both theoretical models and empirical analysis that clarify the interactions between market forces, technological innovation and firm capabilities. Topics include diffusion of technologies and patent races, licensing technology and joint ventures, technology standards, small entrepreneurial firms and innovation, financing R&D and technology policy. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-885*     Managerial Economics and Policy Seminar     
This is a seminar course in which recent publications and studies will be used to highlight various key issues in managerial economics and policy. The specific topics covered may vary from year to year but will be representative of the major areas in which economics informs managerial decision-making. (Crossed with MGMT-985*). Winter. V. Thiele

MGMT-886*     International Trade and Factor Flows     
This course provides a graduate level introduction to international economics with an emphasis on tools useful to managers and policy makers.  Topics will be drawn from the theory of international trade, capital flows, foreign direct investment, migration, and technology flows. The course will cover both key theories in international economics and important empirical applications.  Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-887*     International Economic Policy and Global Management     
This course examines the making of international economic policy from both normative and positive perspectives. Special attention will be given to the strategic implications of international borders for policy makers and managers. Topics include: optimal trade policy, political economy of protection, dispute resolution under NAFTA and the WTO, design of the international financial architecture, exchange rate regimes, skill-focused migration policy, and the international absorption and protection of technological knowledge.  Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-890*     Econometric Methods     
This course covers selected topics in the empirical methods of cross-section and panel data analysis. Various econometric techniques are discussed in workshop format to help students interpret and critically evaluate empirical evidence. Emphasis is placed on practical aspects and application. (Crossed with MGMT-990*). Winter. O. Ivus

NOTE:  Students cannot repeat the 800/900 level course if it is cross listed.

MGMT-898     MSc Research Project     

PhD COURSES

MGMT-900*     Statistics II     
This course will be a continuation of Statistics I. Topics in this course may include, but are not limited to, categorical data analysis, multivariate linear regression, discriminant analysis, canonical correlation, multivariate analysis of variance, principal component analysis, factor analysis, cluster analysis, logistic regression, etc. Fall. P. Dacin.

MGMT-901*     Ethics in Organization Life     
Corporations are widely thought to have an economic obligation to enhance shareholder value and in doing so they have a wide range of legal obligations to stakeholders both within and outside of the organization. But are there moral obligations as well? If so, what are they and to who are they owed? This is a business ethics course taught from a philosophical perspective. No prior course work in ethics is presumed. It is intended for M.Sc. and Ph.D. students who want to deepen their knowledge of ethical issues in both the profit and not-for-profit sectors. For students pursuing further theoretical or empirical work in the field the course provides a solid theoretical foundation. Ethical theories to be examined include Utilitarianism, Kantian Deontology, human rights and virtue ethics. Building on these frameworks, ethical issues will be explored in areas that can include privacy, discrimination and affirmative action, whistle-blowing, workplace health and safety, advertising, conflict of interest, executive compensation, bribery in international business, corporate social responsibility and corporate governance. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-902     Applied Econometrics in Strategy            
This course examines econometric problems specific to the field of management. Despite the existence of rich theoretical frameworks, intriguing and persistent empirical puzzles have evolved around the strategic choices made by firms and around why seemingly well-devised strategies can fail to create value. Recent methodological advances have allowed scholars to delve deeper into understanding organizational behavior and to better model unobserved or omitted factors that can confound the interpretation of results. This is an applied course examining techniques that are important while modelling choice, performance, and survival in the organizational context. Sessions will typically involve a brief review of selected studies, and overview of the underlying methodologies, and hands-on application exercises. As part of the course, students will also have the opportunity to discuss and advance their own studies. (1.5 credit units) Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-903*     Foundations of Multivariate Statistics and the General Linear Model     
This course is designed to provide a common foundation in statistics for doctoral students as a basis for more specialized statistical development. After reviewing some aspects of probability and the theory of statistical estimation, the general linear model is examined in detail. Some important extensions, and certain variants (e.g., discriminant and factor analysis) are also discussed. The emphasis is on the assumptions, limitations and power of the model(s) in the context of applied data analysis. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-904     Strategies for Social Impact     
The goal of this course is to examine management research that investigates the impact of organizations on social issues and social change. Drawing on current developments in strategy and organization theory, the course will cover topics including: social entrepreneurship, social intrapreneurship, measuring social impact, nonprofit organizations, social enterprises and new organizational forms for social impact, scaling and diffusion of social innovations, business and poverty alleviation, corporate philanthropy, among others. (1.5 credit units) Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-905*     Entrepreneurship and Innovation             
This seminar introduces you to theoretical and empirical literature in the domain of entrepreneurship. Research in entrepreneurship draws on a range of other disciplines. In this course the core discipline most frequently drawn upon in the assigned readings will be sociology (and its sub-domains of economic sociology and institutional theory) followed by economics. Theories drawn from psychology will be much less prominent. Following an introduction to entrepreneurship as a distinct field of research, each week will focus on a different stage of the entrepreneurial life cycle of a firm. Topics may include opportunity recognition, the process of innovation, institutional influences on entrepreneurship, the role that networks and social capital play in the development and growth of firms, corporate entrepreneurship, and entrepreneurial exit. Fall. K. Packalen

MGMT-906*     Corporate Strategy Dynamics          
This course examines corporate strategy dynamics, studying how firms scan the environment, gather information, and deal with information asymmetries; how firms perceive, interpret, and respond to environmental threats; and how firms transact under conditions of market failure. These dynamics will be studied in the context of organizational growth, acquisitions, reconfiguration, spatial evolution, strategic alliances, and divestiture. The course is expected to provide opportunities for students to develop and present research ideas in an emerging field. In addition, the course aims to contribute to student research efforts by (i) examining an emerging synthesis of existing theories that has application across domains, including innovation, CSR, governance, strategy process, international business, emerging market strategy, and institutional theory, and (ii) exploring the research process in complex empirical contexts. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-907*     Contemporary Issues in Strategic Management     
This course provides a comprehensive overview of theoretical models and empirical studies that address the fundamental questions in strategic management research: Why do firms perform differently? Why are firms different? How do firms behave? What are firms’ optimal boundaries? Each class will cover a different research stream within the strategic management field such as resource-based theory, knowledge-based view, behavioral theory of the firm, competitive dynamics, dynamic capabilities, alliance portfolios and networks, top management teams, real options theory and diversification strategy. Both seminal and more recent theoretical and empirical research will be discussed. The aim is to help students develop a mental model of the literature and to recognize interrelationships between different research streams. This course is intended for graduate students interested in conducting research in strategic management or related fields. Winter. G. Andrevski

MGMT-908     Social Network Theory and Methods     
In this course, students are introduced to the social networks perspective for analyzing organizational phenomena. Social networks refer to the structure of relationships among individuals, groups, and organizations. The patterns of relationships influence behavior and performance. For example, favorable positions in the network structure are associated with power and influence, innovation and creativity, leadership effectiveness, organizational learning, innovation adoption, firm survival, and organizational performance. The first half of each class will cover theoretical analysis of network constructs such as small worlds, centrality, cohesion, clusters, and structural equivalence. The second part will include a workshop on social network methods and statistical analysis using UCINET software. The workshop will cover topics such as research design, data collection, data management, network measures, hypotheses testing, and visualization. (1.5 credit units) Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-909     Applied Econometrics in Strategy     
This course examines econometric problems specific to the field of management. Despite the existence of rich theoretical frameworks, intriguing and persistent empirical puzzles have evolved around the strategic choices made by firms and around why seemingly well-devised strategies can fail to create value. Recent methodological advances have allowed scholars to delve deeper into understanding organizational behavior and to better model unobserved or omitted factors that can confound the interpretation of results. This is an applied course examining techniques that are important while modeling choice, performance, and survival in the organizational context. Sessions will typically involve a brief review of selected studies, and overview of the underlying methodologies, and hands-on application exercises. As part of the course, students will also have the opportunity to discuss and advance their own studies. (1.5 credit units) Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-910*     Accounting I - Financial Accounting Research     
Elaborating on the themes in Introduction to Accounting Research Markets this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in financial accounting. (crossed with MGMT-810*) Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-911*     Accounting II - Auditing Research     
Elaborating on the themes in Introduction to Accounting Research Experimental and Introduction to Accounting Research Field this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in auditing. Winter. S. Salterio

MGMT-912*     Accounting III - Management Accounting Research     
Elaborating on the themes in the Introduction to Accounting Research Experimental and the Introduction to Accounting Research Field this course will examine in detail cutting edge research in management accounting. Fall. B. Malsch

MGMT-913     Introduction to Accounting Research - Markets     
This course will provide an intensive introduction to principal themes in capital markets research in accounting. (1.5 credit units). (Crossed with MGMT-813). Fall. D. Thornton.

MGMT-914     Introduction to Accounting Research – Experimental     
This course will provide an intensive introduction to principal themes in experimental behavioral research in accounting.(1.5 credit units).(Crossed with MGMT-814). Fall. S. Salterio

MGMT-915     Introduction to Accounting Research – Field      
This course will provide an intensive introduction to the principal themes in qualitative methodological research in accounting. (1.5 credit units). (Crossed with MGMT-815).Fall. B. Malsch

MGMT-916*     Special Topics in Accounting     
Specialized topics in accounting research will be covered. The subject matter may vary from year to year depending on the interests of students and faculty. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-920*     Finance Theory     
This course studies the theoretical foundations of the financial problems faced by individuals and firms under conditions of uncertainty. Contemporary theory is examined as it relates to portfolio selection by individuals, equilibrium market values of capital assets, the behaviour of capital asset prices and yields over time. (Crossed with ECON-870*). Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-921*     Capital Markets, Theory and Empirics     
This course covers the theory and empirics related to capital markets research and the pricing of assets.  Possible topics include characteristics of financial asset returns, tests of market efficiency, asset pricing models, and market microstructure.(Crossed with MGMT-821*). Fall. R. Riordan

MGMT-922*     Corporate Finance, Theory and Empirics     
This course will develop an overall perspective of corporate financial decisions through an integrated coverage of the most important topics of corporate finance. Topics may include theory of the firm, capital structure, dividend policy, corporate governance, and corporate restructuring. (Crossed with MGMT-822*). Winter. E. Dudley.

MGMT-923*     Financial Economics     
The objective of this course is to provide students the rigorous theoretical foundations of modern financial economics. The course will cover the central themes of modern finance including individual investment decisions under uncertainty, stochastic dominance, mean variance analysis, arbitrage pricing theory, capital market equilibrium and asset valuation, risk neutral valuation, and incomplete markets. It will give a quick introduction to Ito calculus and its applications to derivative pricing, including options, futures, interest rates, and credit risks. After completing this course, the students should acquire a clear understanding of the major theoretical results concerning individuals’ consumption and portfolio decisions under uncertainty and their implications for the valuation of securities. Winter. W. Suo PREREQUISITES: Calculus, matrix algebra and probability.

MGMT-924*     Topics in Finance     
This is a seminar course designed to expose students to aspects of finance not covered in detail in other courses in the program. Its aim is to integrate these topics into a broader understanding of the overall field of finance. Topics will vary from year to year depending on the interests and backgrounds of the students and the instructor(s); possible topics may include financial institutions, fixed income securities, corporate governance, and behavioural finance. Students are advised to contact the instructor each year for details of the course coverage. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-925*     Empirical Studies     
This course is intended to introduce students to a number of substantive and, in some cases, specialized topics in the broadly defined area of empirical research in finance. Topics may include characteristics of financial asset returns, tests of market efficiency and empirical tests of asset pricing models. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-926*     Financial Systems: Theory and Applications     
This course discusses the economic role of various types of financial intermediaries and financial markets. Topics include: the role of banks in facilitating financing flows between savers and borrowers; the role of payment systems, their problems and the evolution of electronic clearing systems; the evolution of the financial system and the changing role of institutions in accommodating new functions; financial regulation and deregulation. Examples will be drawn largely from Canada and the U.S.  (Crossed with ECON-871*). Winter. E. Neave

MGMT-927*     Directed Readings and Workshop     
This course consists of two components, both of which are designed to introduce the student to the requirements of academic research in the field of finance. The first component, lasting the entire year, requires students to attend and actively participate in a seminar series with visiting speakers. Students will provide feedback and constructive criticism to the speaker on his or her work. The second component, to take place primarily in the winter semester, requires the student to work individually with a faculty member to produce a comprehensive review of the literature in their field of interest along with suggestions for future research opportunities. Topics are at the discretion of the faculty member. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-939*     Advanced Topics in Marketing     
This seminar course exposes Ph.D. students in marketing to aspects of marketing not covered in detail in other courses in the program. This opportunity could be created by the presence of a visiting scholar or by the desire of current faculty to share the exploration of an emerging topic in marketing theory or practice. The aim of the course would be to integrate the topic into a broader understanding of the field of marketing. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-940     Marketing Strategy and Management I     
The Marketing Strategy and Management I and II seminars survey theories and frameworks associated with practice of marketing as seen through the eyes of academic researchers. Course readings focus on topics related to marketing strategy and marketing management. Marketing strategy consists of the knowledge, concepts and processes that allow firms to evolve and survive in a competitive environment including, the analysis of markets, the allocation of resources for the creation of superior customer value and the creation of a competitive advantage. Marketing management consists of those decision that translate strategic goals into market-based actions typically through implementing various elements of the marketing mix. In addition to the embodiment of a market/customer focus and the understanding and management of key relationships, the application of marketing strategy also ensures that an organization has the structure and processes that allow it to deliver superior benefits and respond in an appropriate and timely manner to change.(Crossed with MGMT-840) (1.5 credit units). Fall. TBA

MGMT-941     Marketing Strategy and Management II     
The Marketing Strategy and Management I and II seminars survey theories and frameworks associated with practice of marketing as seen through the eyes of academic researchers. Course readings focus on topics related to marketing strategy and marketing management. Marketing strategy consists of the knowledge, concepts and processes that allow firms to evolve and survive in a competitive environment including, the analysis of markets, the allocation of resources for the creation of superior customer value and the creation of a competitive advantage. Marketing management consists of those decision that translate strategic goals into market-based actions typically through implementing various elements of the marketing mix. In addition to the embodiment of a market/customer focus and the understanding and management of key relationships, the application of marketing strategy also ensures that an organization has the structure and processes that allow it to deliver superior benefits and respond in an appropriate and timely manner to change. (Crossed with MGMT-841)(1.5 credit units). Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-942     Consumer Behaviour I     
This course seeks to enhance students' appreciation of the interdisciplinary and varied methodological nature of the field by providing an overview of issues concerned with "consumption," in a broad sense, as well as individual level consumer behavior, information processing and consumer decision-making. Topics include sociological and cultural influences on consumers, influences on how consumers interpret and respond to marketing phenomena, and psychological and psycho-social influences on consumer choice and decision processes. (Crossed with MGMT-842)(1.5 credit units). Fall. L. Ashworth

MGMT-943     Consumer Behaviour II                                 
This course extends Consumer Behaviour I by expanding upon the key theoretical perspectives within the discipline of consumer behavior introduced in that course, as well as introducing additional areas of behavioural research not covered in CB I. In both seminars, the focus is on the applicability of behavioral theories and methodologies in the pursuit of a well-developed understanding of the consumption process.(Crossed with MGMT-843)(1.5 credit units). Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-944     Consumer Culture Theory I     
This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research. (Crossed with MGMT-844)(1.5 credit units) Winter. T. Thomas

MGMT-945     Quantitative Models for Marketing I     
The course is designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM-I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate-level models while QMM-II focuses on consumer -level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM-I and QMM-II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual-level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling. (1.5 credit units). Winter. C. Kolsarici.

MGMT-946     Consumer Culture Theory II     
This course will examine consumers and their consumption behaviours and practices as social and cultural phenomena as opposed to economic or psychological phenomena. By examining the relationship between consumers, the market place and cultural meaning, this course will cover the macro, interpretive, and cultural approaches found in Consumer Culture Theory research. (Crossed with MGMT-846) (1.5 credit units). Winter. J. Handelman

MGMT-947*     Research Development I     
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an appreciation of the research process and the broader academic career. Through a series of workshops, lectures, and roundtable discussions, students will develop an understanding of the professional expectations of an academic career, including an appreciation for the academic culture that includes, among other things, critical review processes. Students will learn the central role of theory in the research process and they will start to develop the discipline of effective academic writing that they can apply to their Summer Research project. Students will begin the course by sharing their initial research interests. In workshop fashion, students will come to develop this research interest throughout the course.  (Crossed with MGMT-847*). Fall/Winter. J. Handelman/P. Dacin

MGMT-948     Quantitative Models for Marketing II     
The course is designed to serve as an introduction to quantitative models in marketing with strong emphasis on research that has implications for solving managerial problems. QMM-I investigates market performance of firms using aggregate-level models while QMM-II focuses on consumer -level analysis including choice models. The main objectives for QMM-I and QMM-II are 1) to familiarize students with fundamentals of aggregate and individual-level models in marketing, 2) to help them acquire modeling skills they can apply to their own research or use to appreciate the extant marketing science literature and 3) to encourage students to come up with research areas and ideas that they will be interested to work in. To facilitate students to get acquainted with many topics each session will concentrate on a major managerial problem such as resource allocation, advertising decisions, diffusion of innovations, pricing and promotion decisions. The class discussion will highlight both the managerial significance of various substantive areas and how different modeling techniques are employed to effectively address these problems.(1.5 credit units). Winter. C. Kolsarici

MGMT-949*     Research Development II     
This course builds on the components of the first Research Development course. This course will commence in May which is immediately after the completion of the first course and right in the midst of students conducting their summer research projects. Therefore, the purpose of this course is to provide students with real time guidance as they are developing their summer project. The course also enables students to develop advanced level skills in critiquing their own (and other’s) research work, and advanced level skills at assembling a complete, high quality manuscript. Over the year of the course, students will develop an appreciation for the manuscript review process, and the timelines involved in this process. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-950*     Foundations of Research in Organizational Behaviour     
The purpose of the course is to introduce you to the process of theory building in the field of organizational behaviour.  The course examines several prominent theories in the field and explores recent evidence that assesses central claims made by the theory.  The course also provides opportunities to develop skills in theory building. (Crossed with MGMT-850*). Fall. W. Cooper

MGMT-951*     Seminar in Micro-Organizational Behavior     
The aim of this course is to examine the individual in the organization. Topics include the nature, development and consequences of different forms of leadership, work and well-being, organizational commitment, trust in management, organizational justice, absenteeism and withdrawal from the organization, workplace safety, motivation, and job design.(Crossed with MGMT-851*). Fall. J. Barling

MGMT-952*     Advanced Topics in Organization Theory     
This course analyses the development of, and contemporary directions in, the field of organization theory, with particular focus upon the relevance of organization theory to issues of economy and society. Drawing upon traditional and contemporary social theory as a backdrop, topics covered include scientific management, the human relations school, the Carnegie school, contingency analysis, labour process theory, resource dependence theory, the economic analysis of organizations, institutional theory, organizational demographics, and others. Winter. T. Dacin

MGMT-953*     Seminar in Meso-Organizational Behaviour     
This course introduces students to meso-organizational behavior, which is concerned with the study of organizational phenomena that occur across more than one level of analysis (e.g., individual, group, organizational, national). Students will learn about multilevel theory and methodologies, with an emphasis on the emergence and functioning of collective constructs. The course will also provide coverage of numerous organizational behaviour topics that span levels, which may include person-environment fit, group and organizational climates, group diversity, group processes and performance, socially shared cognition, emotional contagion, and leaders' influence in social collectives. Winter. J. Raver

MGMT-954*     Advanced Topics in Organizational Behaviour I     
course builds upon the material covered in foundational organizational behaviour Ph.D. courses, and provides students with an opportunity for in-depth coverage of selected advanced topics in organizational behaviour. The topics will vary yearly, but there will be an emphasis on the integration of research and theory, as well as enhancing students' research competencies throughout the course. Fall. S. Brodt

MGMT-955*     Special Topics in Management Science     
Specialized topics in Management Science research will be covered.  The subject may vary from year to year depending on the interests of the students and faculty.

MGMT-956*      Advanced Topics in Organizational Behaviour II     
This course provides students with a second opportunity for in-depth coverage of selected advanced topics in organizational behaviour. The topics will vary yearly, but there will be an emphasis on the integration of research and theory, as well as enhancing students' research competencies throughout the course. Fall. C. Miners.

MGMT-957*     Special Topics Reading Course      
Specialized topics in organizational behaviour will be covered. The subject matter will vary from year to year depending on the interests of the faculty.

MGMT-960*     Deterministic Operations Research Models     
This course reviews and extends deterministic operations research model formulation, solution, and applications. Topics may include linear, non-linear, and integer programming, dynamic programming, spreadsheet modelling, network and transportation models, and project management models. (Crossed with MGMT-860*). Fall. M. Thompson

MGMT-961*     Probabilistic Operations Research Models     
This course reviews the formulation, solution, and application of a range of probabilistic modelling techniques. Topics may include inventory models, queueing, simulation, decision analysis, Markov models, forecasting, and stochastic dynamic programming. NOTE: Students cannot repeat the same 800/900 level course if it is cross listed. (Crossed with MGMT-861*). Winter. M. Nediak

MGMT-962*     Stochastic Processes and Applications     
This course provides a review of probability models and introduction to applied stochastic processes that are important in business settings. Topics may include Poisson processes, Markov chains, birth and death processes, random walk problems, elementary renewal theory, general; Markov processes, Brownian motion, and queuing theory. STAT-855* may be substituted for this course. Fall. T. Levin

MGMT-963*     Advanced Topics in Optimization     
This is a seminar designed to permit students to become familiar with the more advanced topics in mathematical programming. Topics covered will include: optimization theory, linear and non-linear programming, network theory, integer programming, and current research topics from the literature. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-964*     Advanced Topics in Operations Research     
This seminar will focus on topics of current interest in the field. Subjects may include combinatorial optimization methods, computational complexity, decision theory, operations management, revenue management, or others. The intention of the seminar is to bring students to the leading edge of research in the field, and extensive use of current journals will be made. Winter. M. Nediak.

MGMT-965*     Analysis of Supply Chains     
In this course we will explore modern analytical approaches to optimization in production and supply chain systems. Topics may include production and inventory control, process control, location analysis, sustainability, and integration of supply chains, including game-theoretic approaches. (Crossed with MGMT-865*)

MGMT-970*     Foundations of MIS I     
This course begins to survey the major research areas in the field, including the design, implementation, use, and management of information systems within organizations. Its purpose is to expose students to the breadth of the field, by analyzing both the classic and current literature. For each area, we will examine the predominant theoretical perspectives, research methodologies, and analytical techniques.(Crossed with MGMT-870*). Fall. J. Webster

MGMT-971*     Foundations of MIS II     
This course continues with the survey of major research areas begun in MGMT-970. Again, for each area, we will examine the predominant theoretical perspectives, research methodologies, and analytical techniques. An emphasis will be placed on students developing their own research expertise and plans: students will learn how to design, conduct, evaluate, and present good research in the MIS area. (Crossed with MGMT-871*). Winter. K. Greenaway

MGMT-972*     Advanced  Topics in the Design, Development and Implementation of Information Systems     
This course examines the development of information systems from the organizational, team and individual perspectives. Proprietary, inter-organizational and open domains of the development of business applications and IT architecture are covered. Topics include IS development practices, IS project management, IS maintenance, and IS sourcing with a focus on how individual characteristics, team dynamics, and organizational factors influence information systems design, development and implementation. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-973*     Advanced Topics in Management Support Systems     
This course examines research on management support systems. Management support systems is a major stream in information systems research covering such topics as decision support systems, group support systems, recommender systems for management, systems to support virtual teams, and knowledge management systems. The course explores the nature, role, and impacts of these systems on individuals and groups in the organization. Research in this area is diverse, covering a variety of theoretical bases, research methods, and reference discipline perspectives. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-974*     Advanced Topics in the Evaluation of Information Systems     
This course examines current research on the impact of information technology on individual, group and organizational performance.  It focuses on developing an understanding of how information technology (IT) changes both the processes and outcomes of work within an organization.  At the individual level, topics include the impact of IT on employee work and productivity, the determinants of IT usage, and the influence of IT on decision-making.  At the group level, topics include the influence of IT on group communication, social processes, and productivity in face-to-face and distributed settings.  At the organizational level, topics involving the evaluation of IT investments and their impact on firm performance are examined.  A variety of research perspectives drawing on methods from psychology, organization theory, strategy, economics, sociology and other disciplines are examined. Winter. S. Addas

MGMT-975*     Special Topics in MIS     
Specialized topics in MIS research will be covered. The subject matter may vary from year to year depending on the interests of students and faculty. Winter. TBD.

MGMT-976*     Emerging Topics in MIS     
Emerging topics in MIS research will be covered. The subject matter may vary from year to year depending on the interests of students and faculty. Winter. Y. Chan

MGMT-980*     Managerial Economics Theory and Research     
This course will introduce students to the economic foundations of management.  It reviews modern microeconomic and macroeconomic theory as they relate to management theory and the firm.  The treatment will be essentially qualitative, although some statistics and mathematics will be required. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-981*     Advanced Topics in Managerial Economics     
This is a seminar course. The specific topics covered may vary from year to year but will be representative of the major areas in which economics informs managerial decision-making. Recent publications and research studies are used both to draw together the theoretical knowledge acquired in earlier courses and to focus the student's attention on the application of this knowledge to business situations. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT 982*     Economics of Organizations     
This course discusses elements of the economics of organizational design and decision processes. Using concepts and techniques from applied microeconomics, it provides an analysis of organizational form, structure, and boundaries. Examples are drawn from the literature to illustrate the theoretical concepts and to demonstrate how they can be used to predict organizational performance and aid in changing organizations effectively. (Crossed with MGMT-882*). Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-983*     Survey of Economics of Technology     
This course surveys the main issues in the Economics of Technology and presents some of the seminal papers in the area. A major goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the nature of the forces driving competitive interaction between technology-based firms. Topics covered include: diffusion of innovations, technology strategy, managing R&D, patents, licensing, and the financial evaluation of new technologies. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-984*     Economics of Technological Innovation     
This course provides an understanding of the economics of technological change and thus the foundations for technology strategy. Throughout the course we study both theoretical models and empirical analysis that clarify the interactions between market forces, technological innovation and firm capabilities. Topics include diffusion of technologies and patent races, licensing technology and joint ventures, technology standards, small entrepreneurial firms and innovation, financing R&D and technology policy. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-985*     Managerial Economics and Policy Seminar      
This is a seminar course in which recent publications and studies will be used to highlight various key issues in managerial economics and policy. The specific topics covered may vary from year to year but will be representative of the major areas in which economics informs managerial decision-making. (Crossed with MGMT-885*). Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-986*     International Trade and Factor Flows     
This course provides a graduate level introduction to international economics with an emphasis on tools useful to managers and policy makers. Topics will be drawn from the theory of international trade, capital flows, foreign direct investment, migration, and technology flows. The course will cover both key theories in international economics and important empirical applications. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-987*     International Economic Policy and Global Management     
This course examines the making of international economic policy from both normative and positive perspectives. Special attention will be given to the strategic implications of international borders for policy makers and managers. Topics include: optimal trade policy, political economy of protection, dispute resolution under NAFTA and the WTO, design of the international financial architecture, exchange rate regimes, skill-focused migration policy, and the international absorption and protection of technological knowledge. Not offered 2016-17.

MGMT-988*     Applied Statistics and Econometrics     
This course is an introduction to the statistical tools needed to test economic relationships. It is designed so that students can understand empirical research and execute independent research projects of their own. The course starts with a review of statistical inference; next it discusses the general linear regression model, and finishes with some advanced topics. Statistical software packages will be introduced and used throughout the course. Fall. P. Sephton

MGMT-989*     Research Project     
The aim of this course is to introduce students to the conduct of research.  Immediately following MGMT-890/990, students complete a research proposal which is presented formally to faculty and graduate students.  Under the supervision of a faculty member, students then devote the Spring and Summer semesters of their first year of studies to carrying out the research outlined in the proposal.  Completion of the course requires a written research paper of publishable quality submitted by the end of the Summer Term, and an oral presentation to faculty and graduate students, early in the Fall of the second year of studies.

MGMT-990*     Econometrics Methods     
This course covers selected topics in the empirical methods of cross-section and panel data analysis. Various econometric techniques are discussed in workshop format to help students interpret and critically evaluate empirical evidence. Emphasis is placed on practical aspects and application. (Crossed with MGMT-890*). Winter. O. Ivus

MGMT-991*     Research Design     
This course provides an in-depth critical analysis of a number of important research approaches. The emphasis of the course is on the development and implementation of several research projects representing various research design and data collection considerations. The objective is to provide advanced doctoral students actual experience with design, implementation and analysis of data.

MGMT-992*     Management Research Topics     
Specialized topics in management research will be covered. The subject matter will vary from year to year depending on the interests of the faculty.

MGMT-993*     Teaching and Learning in Management and Business     
Introduce graduate students to effective teaching techniques. These include traditional classroom-based teaching, case methods, and research seminars. Effective job talks and career management issues will be covered. Classes require active participation by all students; in addition, opportunities to teach will be provided, followed by peer and professor feedback. This is a 3.0 credit unit course. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.

MGMT-999     Ph.D. Thesis    

OTHER COURSES: In addition to courses offered in the School of Business, graduate courses of related Programs within the University may be used to form or complement a student's individual program of study. By way of example, students electing a field in managerial economics will take some course work in the Department of Economics in preparation for their comprehensive field examination. Similar opportunities exist with respect to other fields of specialization.