School of Graduate Studies

School of Graduate Studies
School of Graduate Studies

Mining Engineering

MINE-800*     Mining Systems and Processes     
This course provides an overview of mining systems and processes and is intended to be presented to graduate students and professionals interested in the mining industry. The course is given in modules by faculty and spans a range of topics from mining to mineral processing with emphasis being placed on mining methods, methods of rock breakage, review of ground stability, ventilation, materials handling, mineral beneficiation, economic and environmental assessments, and corporate social responsibility. Three-term hours, fall term.

MINE-801* Community Aspects of Mineral Resource Development
This course provides students with a thorough understanding of community issues associated with mineral resource development. It provides context and examples to demonstrate how the industry response to these issues has changed over time. The business case for a disciplined approach to community engagement and relationship building is outlined. It introduces the topics of community development, community engagement, and indigenous issues which are further explored in subsequent courses. Fall term. E.A. Johnson.

MINE-803* Community Engagement and Mining
This course extends the exploration of a range of community development and community engagement domains, techniques and skills, relating to social technique, participatory approach to community development planning and programming; the use of partnerships as a vehicle for participatory development; social impact assessment; community engagement planning; program monitoring and evaluation. It expands and reinforces the participant's understanding of how the application of professional approaches and methods can assist communities and companies to build sustainable, organized relationships and structures within the broader context of mining and development practice, locally, nationally, and globally. Winter term. E.A. Johnson

MINE-804* Mining Projects and Indigenous Peoples
This course examines the social, political and economic relationships that exist between Indigenous Peoples and external parties in the development of commercial mining operations. The course will review specific social, political and economic issues arising from the engagement of Indigenous Peoples with the minerals industry, and the skill sets and knowledge base that are critical to negotiating positive relationships between Indigenous Peoples and mining companies.Fall term. E.A. Johnson

MINE-812*     Underground Mining     
This course provides a comprehensive discourse of all aspects of underground mining. It is designed to provide engineers with full knowledge to develop strategic and tactical mine planning and to incorporate all aspects of underground mining, including method selection, design, planning, scheduling, development and production. Classification methodologies are introduced to permit selection of a mining method based on orebody characteristics. The program includes description and application of underground mining methods, equipment selection and basic requirements.Layout and design of underground mine development and production and related equipment requirements are presented. Support services, including ground control, ventilation, dewatering, backfill, compressed air are introduced. Winter term; E.M. de Souza

MINE-814*     Advanced Ventilation and Environmental Mine Engineering     
The development of basic airflow models and complex ventilation networks are discussed in depth, and practical design studies using computerized techniques are developed. Topics related to ventilation calculation and design include: mine regulations and engineering design criteria, basic and complex circuit evaluation and design, natural ventilation, fan selection, auxiliary ventilation design, ventilation surveys and ventilation economics. The total environment of mines and air quality control are studied in detail, and include mine gases, mine dust, heat control and radiation hazard and control in mines. Three term-hours, lectures. Fall term. E.M. de Souza

MINE-817*     Advanced Explosives Technology     
Detonation theory and its applications. Topics include: Detonation theory, equations of state, experimental techniques for measuring explosive properties, initiation and sensitivity, shaped charges, metal working with explosives, commercial explosives, metal loaded explosives, dust explosions, pressure desensitization, numerical methods. Three term-hours, lectures. Not offered 2017-18.

MINE-818*     Rock Mechanics     
Theories and application of rock mechanics principles in underground and open pit mine design are discussed. General areas of concentration include assessment of elastic for rock; the determination and influence of in-situ stress on excavation stability; evaluation of ground movement, subsidence and convergence; review of rock slope stability factors and mitigation techniques for stabilization; and assessment of contemporary and innovative measures for ground support provision in underground mines. Three term-hours; Winter term. J.F. Archibald.

MINE-819*     Numerical modelling in mining geomechanics     
This course introduces numerical modelling methods used in mining geomechanics. The basic theory and use of finite difference, finite element, boundary element continuum and discrete particle discontinuum codes will be reviewed with the objective of providing an understanding of the mathematical basis for each method, and their major differences. The emphasis will be on building and interpreting models. Three term-hours, lectures. Winter term. S. McKinnon.

MINE-820*     Topics in Drilling and Blasting     
Rock failure in blasting. Topics include fragmentation, influence of joints and rock structure, theory of fracturing and crack propagation, cratering, blasting-induced vibrations and damage, wall control techniques, numerical methods. Three term- hours, fall and/or winter terms; lectures. P. Katsabanis

MINE-821*     Hydrometallurgy and electrometallurgy: Theory and practice     
This lecture- and seminar-based course covers the advanced topics about hydrometallurgy and electrometallurgy. The course involves the theory of leaching, solid liquid separation, solvent extraction and ion exchange,chemical precipitation and electrometallurgy. In addition, several process options and flowsheets for the recovery of selected base metals (copper, zinc and nickel)and gold will be presented. Each student will perform a literature survey, write a report and present on a topic of interest. Three term-hours, lectures.

MINE-822*     Ore Estimation, Grade Control and Mine Planning     

The impact of ore estimation uncertainty on the mine planning process is examined. Deposits, including precious and base metals are discussed. Strategic mine planning will be studied including: the impacts of regulatory, financial and other constraints on mine optimization; methodologies for determining planning inputs; the role of traditional and emerging algorithms for pit limit analysis and mine scheduling; and, techniques for planning under uncertainty. Students will develop a strategic mine plan for a mineral deposit. The focus will be on surface mining activities, however, the principles are applicable to underground mining. Three term-hours, lectures and laboratory. Not offered 2017-18.

MINE-828*  Seismicity in Mines
This course provides a broad overview of seismicity in mines, ranging from its causes, source mechanisms, waveform analysis, influence of geological factors including stresses, monitoring systems, analysis of seismic data, and applications of seismic data analysis in mining geomechanics and mine design. Familiarity with principles of rock mechanics and structural geology are assumed for the course.Three term-hours; lectures. Winter term. S. McKinnon.

MINE-832*     Flotation Science and Technology     
Roles and applications of flotation in the mining industry, tailings management, recycling and environmental clean-up are discussed. The topics include both interfacial aspects such as wettability, electrical double layer theories, dispersioncoagulation/flocculation, reagent interactions, as well as the engineering aspects such as sampling/mass balancing, kinetics and circuit design. Primary examples of technologies related to processing of sulphide ores, non-sulphide ores, salts, coals and tar sands are covered. The course includes laboratory sessions on selected topics. Three term hours plus 3 lab sessions; Fall and/or Winter term. S. Kelebek.

MINE-836*     Mineral Processing and the Environment     
The objective of this course is to provide an introduction to mineral processing unit operations with regards to final product production. Process selection criteria will be highlighted including economics, efficiency, and geographic location. Environ mental issues associated with producing metals from a variety of ore types will be examined including tailings treatment/impoundment methods and pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical refining techniques. Three term-hours, fall and/or winter term, lectures. S. Kelebek

MINE-838*     Project Decision-making in Extractive Metallurgy     
The goal of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to use information from their undergraduate courses to make decisions on projects of the type that they may face in their future careers. The course will analyze actual project case histories in mining and process metallurgy and evaluate them from technical, economic, and risk perspectives. The objective of each case will be to confront the student and/or group with a decision point similar to that faced in the actual situation. The students will work individually and/or in small groups in an interactive tutorial setting to develop each case for class presentation. There will also be opportunities for interaction with invited experts from industry. The course will show students how to use the key evaluation tools for objective project and process decision-making in mining and process metallurgy. Three term-hours, winter term, lectures. Not offered 2017-18.

MINE-839*     Advanced Pyrometallurgy
In this course, pyrometallurgical technologies for metals extraction are discussed and evaluated. This includes basic thermodynamics, solution thermodynamics and alternative standard states. Models of metallurgical solutions are examined. Stability diagrams are utilized to understand processes and predominance area diagrams are used to explain roasting. Current research areas in pyrometallurgy are discussed with emphasis on energy and the environment.Three term-hours, lectures. Fall term. C.A. Pickles

MINE-851*     Maintenance Engineering     
This course establishes the analytical foundations for the maintenance of heavy industrial plant and mobile equipment in a production environment. Topics covered are: maintenance planning and life-cycle behaviour; condition monitoring, including vibration analysis; organization and management of maintenance; reliability centered maintenance. Three term-hours, lectures. Fall term. L.K. Daneshmend

MINE-852*     Mine Mechanization and Automation     
Objectives, constraints, and methodologies for mechanization and automation. Modelling and simulation of mining processes and equipment. Equipment monitoring. Production monitoring. Navigation and automatic guidance of mobile equipment, including inertial navigation and GPS. Dispatching and scheduling systems. Mine-wide communications systems. SCADA (Supervisory control and data acquisition) systems. Teleoperation and Telerobotics technologies. Machine design in the context of mechanization and automation; reliability and maintainability. Technology transfer issues. Case studies of both surface and underground mines. Not offered 2017-18.

MINE-853*     Mining Robotics     
Mining equipment suppliers now offer robotic tramming systems for surface and underground vehicles, real-time equipment and personnel tracking systems, as well as telerobotic options for loading, haulage, rock breaking, and other heavy equipment. This course offers an introduction to control and estimation engineering as applied to heavy equipment in mining. The class material attempts to provide students with a sufficient foundation to pursue advanced research in this area. Topics include: a review of commonly used sensor technologies; an introduction to vehicle kinematics/dynamics; trajectory and path tracking control; an introduction to vehicle navigation; robotic mapping/surveying; mining machine case studies and examples. Not offered 2017-18.

MINE-855* Autonomous Ground Vehicles Engineering
The objective of this course is to introduce graduate-level engineering students to the fundamentals of autonomous ground vehicles engineering. The course focuses on those tasks usually carried out by autonomy engineers, including sensor selection, applied control (e.g., trajectory and path following) and navigation techniques for robotic wheeled vehicles that operate in real environments (e.g., mining, construction, warehouses, roadways, etc.). The audience is graduate students from all relevant engineering and applied science disciplines who have an interest in mobile robotics, applied control and estimation, and robotic vehicle applications. Winter term. J. Marshall.
PREREQUISITE: Students must have taken at least one undergraduate level course in control systems engineering (e.g., MECH-350, ELEC-443, or equivalent).

MINE-860*     Selected Topics in Mining Engineering     
This course is intended for students at both the Masters and Doctoral levels who already have a good background in fundamental topics related to their research or course-based programs of study, and who are interested in broadening their exposure to other subject areas of mining engineering that are not offered through existing graduate courses. Topics will focus on either mining, mineral processing or mine-mechanical-related areas of mining engineering, and will be presented through lectures, seminar presentations, open classroom discussion and self-directed independent study. The specific course content to be taught to students will be posted in writing at the beginning of each term in which this course will be given, and cannot be related in topic content to a student’s research thesis or project topic. Marking for the course will be assessed on the basis of student assignments, written reports and classroom presentations. Fall and/or winter term. Coordinator: J.F. Archibald

MINE-862*     Issues in Health, Safety and Environment     
The following topics are covered: Introduction to Health and Safety and Environment, Risk Perception and Assessment, Occupational Hygiene, Indoor Air Quality, Principles of Safety Theory and Management, Risk Homeostasis, Principles of Occupational Toxicology, OEL , Toxic Effects of Airborne Contaminants, Dermal Exposure, Evaluation of Airborne Contaminant Levels, Noise, Vibration and Other Physical Agents, Radiation - Ionizing an Nonionizing, Ergonomics, Control Measures for Airborne Contaminants and Heat Stress, Diverse perspectives, Health, Safety and Environment Issues and Engineering Responsibilities, Government, Industry and Labour Unions. Three term-hours, fall term; lectures. M. Morin

MINE-897     Graduate Seminar     
Each student is required to make a presentation concerning his project or research at least once per calendar year. For those students who may only be enrolled in part-time studies, or who may be completing their degree requirements off campus, this requirement may be met through submission of electronic media presentation, which can be viewed, by staff and students, during a regularly scheduled seminar session. This is a non-credit course which each student must pass successfully. J.F. Archibald

MINE-898*     Master's Project     
(3.0 credit units)

MINE-899     Master's Thesis Research     

MINE-999     Ph.D. Thesis Research    

Courses for the Graduate Diploma in Social Performance Management in the Extractive Industries

MINE-800* Mining Systems and Processes
This course provides an overview of mining systems and processes and is intended to be presented to professionals new to working in the mining industry. The course is given in modules by faculty and spans a range of topics from mining to mineral processing with emphasis being placed on mining methods, methods of rock breakage, review of ground stability, ventilation, materials handling, mineral beneficiation, economic and environmental assessments, and corporate social responsibility. Three-term hours, fall term.

MINE-801* Community Aspects of Mineral Resource Development
This course provides students with a thorough understanding of community issues associated with mineral resource development. It provides context and examples to demonstrate how the industry response to these issues has changed over time. The business case for a disciplined approach to community engagement and relationship building is outlined. It introduces the topics of community development, community engagement, and indigenous issues which are further explored in subsequent courses. Fall term. E.A. Johnson.

MINE-803* Community Engagement and Mining
This course extends the exploration of a range of community development and community engagement domains, techniques and skills, relating to social technique, participatory approached to community development planning and programming; the use of partnerships as a vehicle for participatory development; social impact assessment; community engagement planning; program monitoring and evaluation. It expands and reinforces the participant's understanding of how the application of professional approaches and methods can assist communities and companies to build sustainable, organized relationships and structures within the broader context of mining and development practice, locally, nationally, and globally. Winter term. E.A. Johnson.

MINE-804* Mining Projects and Indigenous Peoples
This course examines the social, political and economic relationships that exist between Indigenous Peoples and external parties in the development of commercial mining operations. The course will review specific social, political and economic issues arising from the engagement of Indigenous Peoples with the minerals industry, and the skill sets and knowledge base that are critical to negotiating positive relationships between Indigenous Peoples and mining companies. Winter term. E.A. Johnson.