School of Graduate Studies

School of Graduate Studies
School of Graduate Studies

Mining Engineering

Head
Katsabanis, P.D.

Coordinator of Graduate Studies
Archibald, J.F.

Professor
Archibald, J.F., Daneshmend, L.K.2, Kelebek, S., McKinnon, S.D.1, Pickles, C.A.

Associate Professor
De Souza, E.M., Katsabanis, P.D., Morin, M.

Assistant Professor
Ghahreman, A., Marshall, J.

Adjuncts
Davis, B., Doggett, M., Hodge, R.A., Kalenchuk, K.McIsaac, G., Peacey, J., Peck, J.P.

1 - Chair in Mine Design
2 - Noranda-Falconbridge Chair in Mine-Mechanical Engineering

 


About the Program

The Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining at Queen’s has prepared global mining industry leaders for more than 120 years. It is today not only the largest mining department in Canada but among the largest in the world. In fact, Queen’s mining engineers account for some 33 percent of all Canadian mining and mineral processing engineers who have graduated from Canadian universities.

As technology evolves and the global economy changes, our students and researchers play a key role in defining the state of the art in mining. In close collaboration with industry partners, our faculty and students work to make mining operations safer, more efficient, more productive, less impactful on the natural environment, and more cost effective.

Mining has close relationships with Mechanical and Geological Engineering through cross appointments of the Chair in Mine Mechanical Engineering and the Stollery Professorship in Mining and Geology. Graduate students benefit from courses in these departments, as well as courses in Civil and Chemical Engineering and Geography.The Department offers the degrees of Master of Applied Science (M.A.Sc.), Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) with specializations in Mining Engineering and Mineral Extraction.

An engineering degree from The Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining at Queen’s, with its excellent recognition internationally, equips graduates to become highly employable in the mining industry not only in Canada but worldwide.

Areas of Research

 

Faculty Member Research Areas
James Archibald Radioactive Material/Radon Gas Barriers, Rapidly-deployable Spray-on Membrane Supports, Backfill, Environmental Assessment for New Mine Developments, Rock Mechanics.

Laeeque Daneshmend

Machine Design, Equipment Maintenance, Maintenance Management, Reliability Analysis, Systems Modeling, Simulation and Control, Mining Automation, Telerobotics.
Euler DeSouza Mine Ventilation, Mine Environment, Instrumentation, Backfill.
Ahmad Ghahreman Hydrometallurgy and Biohydrometallurgy, Mineral Processing Wastes and their Remediation, Electrochemical Dissolution of Complex Minerals (fundamental studies), Flowsheet Design and Modeling.
Anne Johnson Management of Social Risk, Sustainability Reporting and Metrics, Mining Law and Policy, Community Relations
Takis Katsabanis Detonation Physics, Blasting, Fragmentation, Vibration.
Sadan Kelebek

Mineral Processing Technology, Process & Tailings Environment, Computer Assisted Process Analysis, Complex Sulphides and Pyrrhotite Rejection.

Joshua Marshall Mining Systems, Field Robotics, and Automation. Development and Application of Methods for Perception, Modelling, Analysis and Control of Mining Equipment and Processes.
Steve McKinnon Stress Fields in Complex Geological Environments, Mine Design in High Stress Conditions, Mining Induced Seismicity, and Geodynamics Modeling of the Earth's Crust.
Mario Morin Occupational Health and Safety, Mining Feasibility, Mine Planning Systems, Underground Mine Design and Planning.
Julian Ortiz Geostatistics, Stochastic Modeling of Ore Deposits, Sampling and QA QC, Geometallurgical Modelling.
Chris Pickles Processes and the Environment, Advanced Pyrometallurgy, Process Engineering for Metals Extraction, Advanced Metals Extraction.

Departmental Facilities

The Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining is located in Goodwin Hall which provides lecture, laboratory and study facilities. The on-campus laboratories include a Rock Mechanics laboratory, Mine Environment laboratory, Computer Planning facilities, and several Mineral Processing laboratories. The department also operates an Explosive Test Site in Hinchinbrooke Township, near Kingston. Laboratories are fully equipped for the programs offered. In addition, they include extensive equipment for advanced study and research in the various fields of major interest. The facilities allow undergraduate courses to be conducted in close proximity to graduate study and research. As a result, sound professional practice can be emphasized while the potential for future development is demonstrated.

Programs of Study

Applicants are accepted under the general regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applications to the M.Eng., M.A.Sc. and Ph.D. programs from other related engineering and science programs are encouraged. These would include, Mechanical Engineering, Geological Engineering, Civil Engineering and Physics programs for mining projects and Metallurgical Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Chemistry programs for mineral processing projects.

Master's Degrees

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.)

The requirement for completion of the M.Eng. degree is eight (8) term length courses. Two of the courses can be at the 400 undergraduate level. Students are eligible to take any relevant courses listed in the Graduate Calendar, as long as at least four (4) of the courses are taken from their home department.  Students generally take a set of courses that fit their background and interest.

In Mining Engineering, students have the option to take MINE-898*, a project-based courses that counts as one course towards the required eight courses total.

All students must take CHEM-801*, a non-credit course in laboratory safety, at the first opportunity after their initial registration. Students who have previously completed MINE-462 or MINE-862 as part of their regular undergraduate or graduate programs at Queen's University, are exempt from this requirement.

Master of Applied Science (M.A.Sc.)

The minimum requirements for the M.A.Sc. are four (4)term length courses, satisfactory participation in the graduate seminar (MINE-897) and completion of a research thesis (MINE-899). Normally, two courses will be taken within and two courses will be taken outside the Mining Department. The department may make exceptions to this academic requirement if a different balance of mining and external courses is beneficial to the student and has the support of the supervisor. One term length course can be from the 400-series in another department, or, under exceptional circumstances, from Mining, but this course must be selected according to applicable regulations.

All students must take CHEM-801*, a non-credit course in laboratory safety, at the first opportunity after their initial registration. Students who have previously completed MINE-462 or MINE-862 as part of their regular undergraduate or graduate programs at Queen's University, are exempt from this requirement.

Doctor of Philosophy

The minimum academic requirements are four term length courses beyond the M.A.Sc. degree, satisfactory participation in the graduate seminar MINE-897, successful completion of the comprehensive examination requirement, and completion of a research thesis (MINE-999). All courses must be taken at the graduate level. Normally, three courses will be taken within and one course will be taken outside the Mining Department. The department may make exceptions to this academic requirement if a different balance of mining and external courses is beneficial to the student and has the support of the supervisor. In certain cases, the number of courses required will be larger than the minimum. The selected academic program must be approved by the Department.

All students must take CHEM-801*, a non-credit course in laboratory safety, at the first opportunity after their initial registration. Students who have previously completed MINE-462 or MINE-862 as part of their regular undergraduate or graduate programs at Queen's University, are exempt from this requirement.

The comprehensive examination, an assessment of the student's understanding of the major areas of Mining Engineering, must be taken by all Ph.D. candidates and may, under special entrance requirements, be required to be taken in two parts.

Should an entering Ph.D. student's background in mining engineering or related disciplines be deemed to be insufficient, a designated program of study and/or completion of general knowledge examinations (first level comprehensive examination) will be required to be taken. The first level comprehensive examination will review the candidate's general background in Mining Engineering and must be held in the fall term of the second year of the Ph.D. program.

If a first level knowledge examination is not required, the Ph.D. student will be required to complete a comprehensive examination leading up to a final thesis defense that will cover the area of specialization and areas of the candidate's background preparation. This examination should be taken at least 18 months after a student's initial registration in the Ph.D. program and no later than 12 months prior to the final thesis defense.

Funding

A minimum funding guarantee for eligible students at the Master’s level of $16,800 and at the Ph.D. level of $18,000 per year is available. M.Eng students are self-funded.

Teaching Assistantships may be offered to stu­dents throughout the academic year.

Registered full-time students who are in good academic standing with Queen’s are eligible for a wide range of internal and external scholarship and bursary awards.

Social Performance Management in the Extractive Industries

The term “social performance” is preferred because it acknowledges industry reality.  The term captures both accountability and the suite of approaches to community relations that must be effected by companies whose activities have the potential to disrupt communities.   Going beyond “community relations,” social performance describes a rigorous and methodical approach to community relations that is accountability focused: on negotiated definition of outcomes, development of mutually-agreed methods for dispute resolution, and on verification of outcomes satisfactory to all stakeholders. 

Program Details 
The SPMEI Graduate Diploma consists of four courses, delivered in an online and asynchronous format.  The program may be completed on a part-time basis over two or four 12 week terms, and courses may be applied towards completion of M.Eng. or M.A.Sc. degrees.*

The Diploma consists of 4 core courses: MINE-800, MINE-801, MINE-803, and MINE-804.

Admission
Admission requirements for students entering the Diploma program will include:

  • A baccalaureate degree from a recognized university;
  • B- graduating average or higher (70% graduating average or a ranking in the top third of the graduating class where number grades are not available);
  • Under exceptional circumstances, consideration will be given to highly motivated individuals with relevant field experience who do not meet the B- requirement; and 
  • A statement of interest in the program will be required in order to ensure alignment of the applicant’s academic background, work experience, and career aspirations with the objectives of the program.

Although an Engineering degree is not required, relevant work experience in the area of Mining or other Extractive industries is essential.

For more information, contact the Mining Graduate Assistant to indicate interest.