School of Graduate Studies

School of Graduate Studies
School of Graduate Studies

Protecting Traditional Knowledge from Biopiracy

​When Oluwatobiloba ("Tobi") Moody's doctorate is complete, it will be to the benefit of cultural innovators around the world – helping Tobi ensure that traditional cultures see justice for appropriated knowledge.

After a childhood in both England and Nigeria, Tobi was drawn to Queen’s for a variety of reasons: “the relatively small size of the program, the quality of academic supervision in my area of study, as well as the location of the Queen’s campus,” he explains. “Kingston is really a lovely little historic city; the people are friendly and it has minimal academic distractions which promotes academic work. It’s also situated close enough to the major neighbouring cities for the occasional tour!”

Tobi has found inspiration and support working under the supervision of Dr. Bita Amani. “It’s been a fantastic relationship and I’ve really enjoyed working under her,” he says. “She inspires confidence, believes in my ideas, and has been a significant mentor through various research phases.”

Tobi studies indigenous groups and justice, with a particular focus on the misappropriation of traditional knowledge. “Their knowledge has been used for several profitable innovations in our present world. They are however rarely compensated for this. My research examines the international instrument recently adopted to address this – the Nagoya Protocol. To ensure the Protocol’s effective implementation, my research suggests the need for a reinforcement of the Nagoya Protocol through the global Intellectual Property System,” he explains.

He intends to continue working on international policy, with a specific focus on African development.