Department of Sociology

DEPARTMENT OF

Sociology

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Undergraduate Program

First year students take our leading edge blended learning course in Introductory Sociology. This course introduces students to the core ideas and themes in Sociology, using a variety of teaching and learning methods that combine the latest technologies with dynamic lectures and small group tutorials. Students learn the basics of Sociology, but we also train them in university level writing, argumentation and research skills.        

After taking Introductory Sociology in their first year, students take core training courses in theory and methods in their second year, alongside a wide array of optional courses. In their third and fourth years, students choose increasingly specialized option courses. Third year students have many opportunities to study Sociology abroad through the International Programs Office. Fourth year courses are seminars with a maximum of 25 students, enabling an excellent faculty to student ratio. Fourth year students may also opt to work with a professor on a thesis project over two terms on a specialized topic. 

The courses in the undergraduate program cover a very broad range of topics such as - Gender, Race and Class, Globalization, Visual and Consumer Culture, Cultural Studies, Social Psychology, Social Control, Health and the Body, and Development - allowing students to sample the field broadly or specialize in our particular three core areas:

Media, Information & Surveillance

Criminology & Law

Power, Inequalities & Social Jsutice

Requirements

Degree Plans Offered:
Bachelor of Arts - GEN/MIN
Bachelor of Arts (Honours) - MAJ
Bachelor of Arts (Honours) - MED
 
Degree Requirements
If you'd like to ascertain whether you have or will meet all of your degree requirements - please check your Academic Advisement Report (AAR) on Solus. If you need assistance in understanding requirements, contact the Undergraduate Program Assistant or contact your Undergraduate Chair
 
Sociology GENERAL/MINOR
Plan You will need 30.0 units (plus 60.0 electives) as described below:
  • Core: 6.0 units from SOCY122
  • Options: 24.0 units from SOCY at the 200 level or above
Sociology MEDIAL Plan
You will need 42.0 units (plus 72.0 electives) as described below:
  • Core: 18.0 units from SOCY122, SOCY210, SOCY211, SOCY226, SOCY227 (C in each)
  • Options: 21.0 units in SOCY at the 200 level or above; 3.0 units in SOCY at the 400 level or above
  • Admission to 400 Level: 84.0 units plus 2.6 GPA from core SOCY200 level and 18.0 units from SOCY options
Sociology MAJOR Plan
You will need 60.0 units (plus 54.0 electives) as described below:
  • Core: 18.0 units from SOCY122, SOCY210, SOCY211, SOCY226, SOCY227 (C in each)
  • Options: 21.0 units in SOCY at the 200 level or above; 15.0 units in SOCY at the 300 level or above; 6.0 units in SOCY at the 400 level or above
  • Admission to 400 Level: 84.0 units plus 2.6 GPA from core SOCY200 level and 18.0 units from SOCY options

What Can You Do With Sociology? (Careers)

Our students develop a range of essential skills:

  • Research Skills – conduct research, use social scientific databases, understand journal articles, explain and interpret social research data
  • Research Techniques – employ the relevant qualitative and quantitative research techniques to produce and analyze data
  • Research and Program Evaluation – accurately and critically evaluate existing research and programs 
  • Reason and Argument – develop coherent and reasoned argument; deconstruct and critique arguments and evidence
  • Problem Solving – approach an issue from several perspectives in a systematic manner 
  • Oral, Written and Media Communication – write coherent reports, present information orally and visually in a range of media 
  • Resource and Time Management – effective prioritization of resources, skills and time, to complete projects 
  • Observational and Interpretive Skills – accurately identify, interpret and explain relevant social phenomena and issues
  • Critical Thinking – critically assess ‘common sense’ approaches to social issues and provide alternative explanations  

Our students have pursued successful careers in:

  • Professional Academic
  • Law
  • Criminal Justice
  • Statistics Canada
  • Human Resources
  • Consumer Research
  • Health Research
  • Media
  • Communications
  • Advertising & Marketing
  • Social Services
  • Corporate Training
  • Program Evaluation
  • Corporate Research
  • Social Policy
  • Urban and Regional Planning
  • Counselling
  • Education
  • Publishing
  • Editing
  • International Aid
  • Human Rights organizations
  • Policy Analysis
  • Public Administration & Policy
  • Public Relations
  • Global Development
  • Charities

For help and support
Career Services

Contact Us

If you have general questions regarding our program, contact Michelle Underhill:
 
Michelle Underhill
Undergraduate Program Assistant
Macintosh-Corry Hall, Room D431
Tel (613) 533-2166
Fax (613) 533-2871
 
If you have questions regarding option choices, pathways, or would simply like advice on your Undergraduate choices, contact Dr. Martin Hand:
 
Dr. Martin Hand
Undergraduate Chair
Macintosh-Corry Hall, Room D529
Tel (613) 533-6000 ext: 74494
Fax (613) 533-2871