School of Policy Studies

School of Policy Studies
School of Policy Studies

Clinton v. Trump: the Structure of the 2016 Presidential Vote

Elizabeth Goodyear-Grant

Director of the Queen’s Institute of Intergovernmental Relations,
Associate Professor in the Department of Political Studies, Queen’s University

Thursday December 1, 2016,  12:00 pm 
Robert Sutherland Hall, 138 Union Street, Room 202

** Light lunch starts at 11:30 AM             All are Welcome

 


Elizabeth Goodyear-Grant | December 1, 2016

 

Elizabeth Goodyear-Grant

Director of the Queen’s Institute of Intergovernmental Relations,
Associate Professor in the Department of Political Studies, Queen’s University

 

Abstract:

In this talk Elizabeth Goodyear-Grant, Director of both the Institute of Intergovernmental Relations and the Canadian Opinion Research Archive will talk about the candidates’ strengths and weaknesses in the electorate along with the politics of resentment that characterized much of the Trump discourse. She will also make some comparative observations on the structure of opinion observed in the Canadian general election of October 2015 and the so-called Brexit referendum of June 2016 in the United Kingdom.

 

Biography:

Elizabeth Goodyear-Grant (Ph.D. McGill) is Director of the Queen’s Institute of Intergovernmental Relations, Director of the Canadian Opinion Research Archive, as well as an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Studies at Queen’s University. Her research focuses on elections; voting behaviour and public opinion; political communication; methods of measuring gender in survey research; and the political representation of women. She is the author of Gendered News: Media Coverage and Electoral Politics in Canada (Vancouver: UBC Press, 2013), which won the 2015 Pierre Savard Award from the International Council for Canadian Studies (ICCS). This award is given annually to recognize books of exceptional quality that contribute to a better understanding of Canada, at home as well as abroad. Gendered News was also one of three books shortlisted for the Canadian Political Science Association’s 2014 Donald Smiley Prize, an award for best book published in Canadian Politics in the preceding year, and named one of the best books of 2014 by the Hill Times. Her current research projects include a collaborative projects on the measurement of gender in survey research, the behavioural foundations of fiscal federalism, as well as solo work on how electoral institutions and quota measures affect levels of and changes in women’s representation in post-industrial democracies.