School of Policy Studies

School of Policy Studies
School of Policy Studies

Panel: Sharing the Land, Sharing a Future: Twenty years after RCAP

Marlene Brant Castellano
Jill Scott

Friday November 25, 2016,  12:00 pm 
Robert Sutherland Hall, 138 Union Street, Room 202

** Light lunch starts at 11:30 AM             All are Welcome

 


Marlene Brant Castellano | November 25, 2016

 

Marlene Brant Castellano

Professor Emerita,Trent University

 

 

 

Jill Scott | November 25, 2016

 

Jill Scott

Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning) and Professor,
Department of Languages, Literature and Cultures, Queen’s University.

 

 

 

Abstract:

The School of Policy Studies recently helped to organize a national forum on the twentieth anniversary of the report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. Professor Castellano will report on the discussions about the current relevance of the RCAP legacy, the challenges before us, and the central importance of citizen engagement in achieving the fundamental change necessary to reconciliation. Professor Scott will talk about encouraging change at the community and institutional level, using the Queen's Truth and Reconciliation Task Force as an example.

 

Biographies:

Marlene Brant Castellano is a Mohawk of the Bay of Quinte and Professor Emerita of Trent University where she provided leadership in the development of the emerging discipline of Indigenous Studies (1973-96). She served as Co-Director of Research with the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (1991-96) and as a member of the Interagency Advisory Panel on Research Ethics (PRE) drafting the 2nd edition of the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (TCPS2). The policy, including a dedicated chapter on research involving First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples, was adopted in 2010 by SSHRC, CIHR and NSERC. Professor Castellano currently co-chairs the Aboriginal Council of Queen’s University.

Jill Scott is the Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning) and Professor in the Department of Languages, Literature and Cultures at Queen’s University. She has been engaged in Indigenous studies since 2006, teaching and researching in the areas of Indigenous legal traditions and the role of cultural revitalization to redress and reconciliation. She is a co-founder of the BA General program in Indigenous Studies and is currently part of an initiative to develop certificates in Mohawk Language and Indigenous Languages. Dr. Scott is currently serving as co-chair of the Task Force on Truth and Reconciliation at Queen’s University.