School of Policy Studies

School of Policy Studies
School of Policy Studies

Donald Matthews Faculty Fellowship in Global Public Policy

The Donald Matthews Lecture Series is supported by the Matthews Faculty Fellowship in Global Public Policy. Established by Donald Matthews (B.Sc. 1950) in 2006, this endowment supports the appointment of world-class, leading-edge scholars and practitioners to teach, lead research and share their experience with students and faculty at Queen’s University. It continues and honours the life-time commitment of Donald Matthews, a Canadian business leader, to public service.

Donald Matthews served with distinction in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War, subsequently returning to Queen’s University to study engineering. Following graduation, Matthews founded his own construction firm, which was remarkably successful. Named in 1989 as Canada’s seventh largest construction company, it was active in planning, aggregate quarrying and sales, house-building and heavy construction. Matthews also headed a consortium in the 1990s involved in the design, development and construction of airports around the world.

Throughout his life, Matthews combined private pursuits with public purpose. As a university student, he was elected by student veterans across Canada to help design special programs to assist Canadian veterans to finish post-secondary studies. As a young professional, he was involved in local politics in the City of London. As a successful business leader, he was a close advisor to Ontario premiers, John Robarts and William Davis, and several national leaders. In 1974, he served as president of the Council for Canadian Unity. In the 1990s, he served as a member of the Board of Directors of the Bank of Canada.

Donald Matthews exemplifies the Queen’s ideal as a leader and citizen and has inspired many, including his children and grandchildren, to follow his example of engagement in economic and political affairs.


2013: Don Drummond

Wanted: A New Breed of Civil Servant

November 8, 2013

Don Drummond
Former Senior VP and Chief Economist, TD Bank
Matthews Fellow and Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Queen's School of Policy Studies

Lecture notes [PDF 391kb]

 Don Drummond | November 2013Don Drummond is the Matthews Fellow in Global Public Policy and Adjunct Professor at the School of Policy Studies at Queen’s University. In 2011-12, he served as Chair for the Commission on the Reform of Ontario’s Public Services. Its final report, released in February 2012, contained nearly four hundred recommendations to provide Ontarians with excellent and affordable public services.

Mr. Drummond previously held a series of progressively more senior positions in the areas of economic analysis and forecasting, fiscal policy and tax policy during almost 23 years with Finance Canada. His last three positions were respectively Assistant Deputy Minister of Fiscal Policy and Economic Analysis, Assistant Deputy Minister of Tax Policy & Legislation and most recently, Associate Deputy Minister. In the latter position he was responsible for economic analysis, fiscal policy, tax policy, social policy and federal-provincial relations and coordinated the planning of the annual federal budgets.

He subsequently was Senior Vice President and Chief Economist for the TD Bank (2000-2010), where he took the lead with TD Economics’ work in analyzing and forecasting economic performance in Canada and abroad. For Canada, this work was conducted at the city, provincial, industrial and national levels. TD Economics also analyzes the key policies which influence economic performance, including monetary and fiscal policies. He is a graduate of the University of Victoria and holds an M.A. (Economics) from Queen’s University.

2012: Don Drummond

How Did the World Get So Messed Up? Some Old and New Lessons

September 14, 2012

Don Drummond
Former Senior VP and Chief Economist, TD Bank
Matthews Fellow and Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Queen's School of Policy Studies

Don Drummond | September 2012From the recent global economic crisis emerge some old lessons, some new lessons and a lot of questions for macroeconomic policy makers. By 2007 complacency had sunk in around the world. It all seemed quite simple. The theory but not the practice of running balanced fiscal policy was widely accepted. Maintaining low and stable inflation was thought to be the cure for wild economic cycles. But then the worst economic cycle since the Great Depression hit. What went wrong and what are the lessons? The first lesson is that keeping inflation low may still be a necessary condition for good economic performance but it is certainly not sufficient. Second, fiscal imbalances are more problematic and more difficult to recover from than previously believed. So even greater effort must be applied to align practice with theory. Many would say a third lesson is that greater international policy co-ordination is needed. But how far should sovereign countries go in ceding their policy authority to international bodies? And can we be confident the co-ordinators will know what they are doing?

2011: Don Drummond

Is Ontario's Healthcare System Sustainable?

April 29, 2011

Don Drummond
Former Senior VP and Chief Economist, TD Bank
Matthews Fellow and Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Queen's School of Policy Studies

Don Drummond | April 2011Is Ontario's healthcare system sustainable? Yes, if we're prepared to pay ever-increasing taxes or squeeze out everything else, including education but we probably don't want to do that so we need to reform it. Informed people have all come to that conclusion but the population mass just wants more and better health care, doesn't have a clue the resources that are being consumed and doesn't seem to really care, at least not for the moment. So the typical Canadian approach of not only blaming Government for the problem but simultaneously turning to them for the solution won't work.

2010: David A. Dodge

Canadian Economic and Financial Policies: Where to from here?

March 4, 2010

David A. Dodge
Chancellor, Queen's University and Senior Advisor, Bennett Jones, LLP

Lecture notes [PDF 67kb]

David A. Dodge | August 2011The purpose of this talk is to explore what might be the evolution of Canadian economic policies over this new decade with a particular emphasis on budgetary policies of the federal and Ontario governments. Canada begins this decade in the early stages of emerging from a severe recession during which federal and provincial governments are running large fiscal deficits and accumulating large amounts of additional public debt. Moreover, on the basis of the mid to longer term economic outlook and current policies of the federal and provincial governments, the underlying total fiscal position of governments (federal plus provincial) is projected to deteriorate over the decade ahead.