Academic Calendar 2022-2023

6 Academic Standards and Requirements

6.1 Academic Integrity

Queen’s University is dedicated to creating a scholarly community free to explore a range of ideas, to build and advance knowledge, and to share the ideas and knowledge that emerge from a range of intellectual pursuits.

Queen’s students, faculty, administrators and staff therefore all have responsibilities for supporting and upholding the fundamental values of academic integrity. Academic integrity is constituted by the five core fundamental values of honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility (see International Center for Academic Integrity ) and by the quality of courage. These values and qualities are central to the building, nurturing and sustaining of an academic community in which all members of the community will thrive. Adherence to the values expressed through academic integrity forms a foundation for the "freedom of inquiry and exchange of ideas" essential to the intellectual life of the University.

The following statements from “The Fundamental Values of Academic Integrity” (2nd edition), developed by the International Center for Academic Integrity (ICAI), contextualize these values and qualities:

  1. Honesty: Academic communities of integrity advance the quest for truth and knowledge through intellectual and personal honesty in learning, teaching, research, and service.
  2. Trust: Academic communities of integrity both foster and rely upon climates of mutual trust. Climates of trust encourage and support the free exchange of ideas which in turn allows scholarly inquiry to reach its fullest potential.
  3. Fairness: Academic communities of integrity establish clear and transparent expectations, standards, and practices to support fairness in the interactions of students, faculty, and administrators.
  4. Respect: Academic communities of integrity value the interactive, cooperative, participatory nature of learning. They honour, value, and consider diverse opinions and ideas.
  5. Responsibility: Academic communities of integrity rest upon foundations of personal accountability coupled with the willingness of individuals and groups to lead by example, uphold mutually agreed-upon standards, and take action when they encounter wrongdoing.
  6. Courage: To develop and sustain communities of integrity, it takes more than simply believing in the fundamental values. Translating the values from talking points into action -- standing up for them in the face of pressure and adversity — requires determination, commitment, and courage.

Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with and adhering to the regulations concerning academic integrity. General information on academic integrity is available at Academic Integrity @ Queen's University, along with School specific information below.

Departures from Academic Integrity

A departure from academic integrity includes any deliberate attempt to gain unfair advantage academically for oneself or others. All forms of departure from academic integrity are considered serious offences within the University community. The following defines the domain of relevant acts without providing an exhaustive list:

Plagiarism

Allowing it to be thought that another's ideas or phrasings are one's own by failing to provide proper acknowledgement. Some examples are:

  • Copying and pasting from the internet
  • Copying a printed source or other resource without proper acknowledgement
  • Copying from another student in the same or different year of the Program or another Program
  • Copying from another’s test paper
  • Using direct quotations or large sections of paraphrased material in an assignment without appropriate acknowledgement
  • Submitting the same piece of work in more than one course without the permission of the instructors
Use of unauthorized materials
  • Possessing or using unauthorized study materials or aids during a test
  • Copying from another's test paper
  • Using an unauthorized calculator or other aids during a test
  • Unauthorized removal of materials from the library, or deliberate concealment of library materials
  • Obtaining materials such as answer keys, copies of former students notes (either directly or through an online source to which they have been uploaded without the professor’s explicit permission) or case solutions and using them to complete your own assignments.
  • Obtaining a copy of, or information about, a test or exam from an earlier section of the course and writing the test or exam later in the day or subsequent days.
Facilitation
  • Enabling another's breach of academic integrity
  • Making information available to another student, such as knowingly allowing one's essay or assignment to be copied by someone else, or giving information about a test or exam to a student writing the same test or exam later in the day or subsequent days
  • Selling or distributing term papers or other assignments
  • Completing an assignment for another student
  • Knowingly assisting another person to conceal their departure from academic integrity.
Unauthorized collaboration
  • Working with others, without the specific permission of the instructor, on assignments that will be submitted for a grade
  • This applies to in-class or take-home tests, papers, online quizzes or homework assignments. It also applies to individual assignments as well as group assignments (where collaboration is restricted to members within the assigned group). Students may not collaborate without the instructor’s authorization.
Forgery
  • Utilizing counterfeit documents or statements (e.g. creating or altering a transcript, medical note or other official documents).
Falsification
  • Misrepresentation of one's self, one's work or one's relation to the University
  • Altering transcripts or other official documents relating to student records
  • Impersonating someone in an examination or test
  • Submitting a take-home examination written, in whole or in part, by someone else
  • Buying term papers or other assignments and submitting them as one's own
  • Fabricating or falsifying research data or source material (whether by commission or by omission)
  • Allowing someone else to do research work without the knowledge and approval of the instructor
  • Failing to appropriately recognize contributions of others
  • Attributing authorship of work to persons other than those who have contributed to the work in a meaningful way.
     

Process for Investigating Suspected Departures from Academic Integrity

The Smith School of Business Policy on Academic Integrity sets out complete procedures and processes for handling suspected departures from academic integrity. Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the policy. Normally, where a course professor has a concern about a possible departure from academic integrity, the professor will notify the student and investigate in accordance with Smith policy. The student will have an opportunity to respond and their response will be considered part of the evidence in the case.

In complex cases the professor may refer the case to the Smith School of Business Academic Integrity Panel for investigation. In this situation, the Academic Integrity Panel will notify the student of the potential departure and investigate in accordance with Smith policy.

In cases of a subsequent departure from academic integrity (that is, where there is a previous departure on record for the student), the professor will make a finding but refer the case to the Academic Integrity Panel for the determination of a sanction. 

Sanctions for Departures from Academic Integrity

Any student who is found to have committed a violation of academic integrity may face a range of sanctions, including but not limited to: receiving a warning, a learning experience (rewrite/revision of paper), a grade of zero on the assignment, a failure in the course, a recommendation to Queen's Senate that the student be required to withdraw from the University for a period of time or that a degree be rescinded.

Records of findings of departures from Academic Integrity are kept in the Dean’s Office and in the Program Office.

6.2 Attendance

Students must be registered in a class section to be eligible to attend or otherwise participate in lectures, tutorials, tests, and examinations associated with the class. Students are expected, and at the discretion of the instructor may be required, to be present at all lectures, tutorials, tests, and examinations in their classes and to submit essays, exercises, reports, and work at the prescribed times. If you are unable to attend, or submit deliverables, see Academic Consideration for Students in Extenuating Circumstances for more information.

Courses offered on-campus will not be modified to allow students to complete the course without regularly attending classes.

Student conduct in lectures, tutorials, tests and examinations must conform to the Queen’s University Student Code of Conduct.

Absence and Missed Couse Work

A student who is ill or has compassionate grounds as reason for missing lectures, laboratory work, or assignments is responsible for making alternative arrangements with the instructors concerned for extensions or other consideration. For more information see Academic Consideration for Students in Extenuating Circumstances.

6.3 Academic Consideration for Students in Extenuating Circumstances

Queen’s University recognizes that students may have extenuating circumstances that temporarily affect their ability to fulfill their academic obligations and requirements. The institutional response to requests for academic consideration due to extenuating circumstances is based on the principle of good faith, wherein the university and instructors are requested to assume that student circumstances and documented requests are legitimate unless there is compelling evidence to suggest otherwise. Similarly, students are requested to assume that the university and instructors will provide academic considerations that are deemed to be in the best interest of the student, considering academic progress and essential academic requirements and standards.

For more information, see the full Student Policy Index.

Extenuating Circumstances

Certificate students are required to meet “essential academic requirements and standards” defined as the knowledge and/or skill which must be acquired and/or demonstrated for a student to successfully meet the learning objectives or degree level requirements of a required academic activity.

Smith School of Business recognizes that students may experience extenuating circumstances that affect their ability to fulfill their academic obligations and requirements. Extenuating circumstances means a personal circumstance beyond the student’s control that has a direct and substantial impact on the student’s ability to meet essential academic requirements or standards. Extenuating circumstances include, but are not limited to, a sudden or acute physical or mental illness, serious injury to self or significant others, bereavement, a traumatic event, or other serious personal/family crisis. This definition is not intended to be exhaustive, as there are a wide range of circumstances that may impact the well-being of students, including experiences of racism, exclusion, discrimination, sexual violence, and/or financial difficulties.

Please note extenuating circumstances do not include personal or family events (e.g. holidays, weddings), academic or exam stress, or transportation or technological difficulties. Running for election or serving on student government or other committees/associations are also not considered extenuating circumstances.

Students are responsible for submitting a request for academic consideration if they will be absent or are unable to complete any portion of their course work or other academic requirements, or complete it on time, due to extenuating circumstances. Students are expected to request academic consideration as soon as extenuating circumstances are apparent. Retroactive requests for academic consideration will be assessed on a case-by-case basis in consultation with the course instructor.

Some requests for academic consideration may require supporting documentation. Appropriate supporting documentation varies, but does not need to outline the specifics of the particular condition or matter affecting the student. Typically, documentation should indicate the severity of the student’s circumstance and the anticipated duration of impairment.

After the request for academic consideration has been processed, it is the student’s responsibility to communicate and work with the instructor for the purpose of determining academic consideration. It also the student’s (or their delegate’s) responsibility to provide updates related to ongoing needs or changing circumstances.

Smith School of Business is committed to responding to students in a fair and consistent manner. Academic consideration may be individualized due to the nature of each student’s specific circumstances, and according to Certificate program requirements. Faculty Offices may exercise discretion in responding to requests for academic consideration in extenuating circumstances, as appropriate, while working with faculty to ensure that essential academic course requirements are met.

As a matter of academic integrity, a student is responsible for making an honest declaration concerning the nature of their illness and its impact on their academic obligations. Declarations thought to be false may be investigated as a violation of academic integrity. For more information, see Academic Integrity.

6.4 Language

In accordance with Queen’s University Language Policy, examinations and assignments are to be submitted in English, except where a Faculty Board has approved an alternative practice or where a special agreement has been entered into between the Certificate program and a student.

6.5 Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources Policy

All members of the Queen’s community are bound by the Queen’s policy on the Acceptable Use of Information Technology (IT) Resources. The policy states:

The use of Queen's University information technology (IT) resources must be consistent with the academic mission of the University. These IT resources are provided to support the teaching, learning, research and administrative activities of the Queen's community. As a member or guest of the Queen's community, you may have access to valuable internal and external networks and resources, and Sensitive Information, and you are expected to use these resources in a responsible, ethical, and legal manner. Your actions should not adversely affect the ability of others to use these resources, or compromise the security and privacy of sensitive information.

Submission of Electronic Assignments

Students may be required to submit assignments electronically.  It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that all electronic submissions are corruption-free.

Any assignment that is detected to be carrying a corrupt file will be immediately destroyed, and the student must re-submit the assignment corruption-free. If the assignment is not re-submitted before the assignment deadline it will be marked “late.”

6.6 Examination

Access to Examinations

The term final examination paper refers to the final examination question paper in a course together with the graded answer paper written by the student. These documents, in accordance with the Senate Policy on Student Access to Final Examination Papers, must be retained by the professor or the School for a period of 12 months.

Informal Access
Professors may informally review the final examination paper with a student who requests it and are encouraged to do so. However, access may not be granted before the final marks are released.

Formal Access
A student may obtain access to their final exam as part of an appeal process. This may be supervised access to, or a copy of, the final examination paper.  The student should contact the Program Manager to arrange for formal access to their final exam. For more information see Appeals of Grades.

Access to Examination Question Papers
For reference purposes, final examination question papers will normally be made available by the end of September (for the previous academic year) to students through their publication in the ExamBank, which is available online. Exemptions from the policy for particular examination question papers may be granted by the Executive Director (or delegate) only in exceptional circumstances and only on an annual basis, on the written request of the instructor, with the signed approval of the Executive Director (or delegate).

Tests and Examinations in the Last Two Weeks of Classes

In order to not interfere with the prescribed number of weeks of instruction and to encourage good attendance in classes during the last two (2) weeks of classes, instructors shall not schedule major tests or quizzes during this period in either the fall or winter terms.

Tests or Quizzes
A test or quiz which:

  • Takes place outside of the scheduled lecture period for a course;
  • Covers more than the work of the preceding six (6) weeks; and/or
  • Counts for more than 20% of the final mark in a 3.0 unit course or 10% of the final mark in a 6.0 unit course.

cannot be held in the last two (2) weeks of class (i.e. week 11 or week 12). Tests or quizzes after the last day of class must be scheduled as part of the final exam period.

Take Home or De Facto Examinations
Take home or other forms of de facto examinations are essentially replacements for final examinations or end-of-term tests for which the Exams Office provides a schedule.

A take-home examination which:

  • Covers more than the work of the preceding six (6) weeks; and/or
  • Counts for more than 20% of the final mark in a 3.0 unit course or 10% of the final mark in a 6.0 unit course

cannot be due in the last two (2) weeks of class (i.e. week 11 or week 12), or in the first seven (7) calendar days after the first day of the examination period.

If a take-home examination must be completed in a short period of time (i.e. 48 hours or less), instructors are encouraged to have it scheduled within the final exam period.

Major Term Essays
A major term essay – which counts for more than 20% of the final mark in a 3.0 unit course or 10% of the final mark in a 6.0 unit course - must be assigned, including the details of the assignment, in the first six (6) weeks of the term if it is due any time between the beginning of the 11th week of classes and the last day of the examination period.

Presentations
A presentation which:

  • Takes place outside of a regular lecture period;
  • Covers more than the work of the preceding six (6) weeks; and/or
  • Counts for more than 20% of the final mark in a 3.0 unit course or 10% of the final mark in a 6.0 unit course

must be assigned, including the details of the assignment, in the first six (6) weeks of the term if it is to be held in the last two (2) weeks of term or at any time during the final examination period.

Scheduling of Final Examinations

The final examination in any class offered in any term or session (including Summer Term) must be written on the campus on which the class was taken, at the end of the appropriate term or session at the time scheduled by the Examinations Office. The final examination schedule may not be changed once the schedule is posted.

A student who is unable to write an examination due to extenuating circumstances must make alternate arrangements with the instructor. Students who find themselves in such circumstances may seek permission to write the examination at a later time by appealing in writing to the instructor of the course. For more information see Academic Consideration for Students in Extenuating Circumstances.

Final examinations may not last longer than 3 hours, except in the case of students who require accommodation requested through Queen’s Student Accessibility Services.

Scheduling Conflicts
A student discovering a conflict (two examinations at the same hour, three consecutive examinations in a 24-hour period or an examination at the same hour as a religious observance) should report the conflict to the University Registrar’s Exams Office, as soon as possible.

Location of Final and Mid-Year Examinations

The final examination in any on-campus class offered in any term or session must be written on the campus on which the class was taken.

Students Living in the Kingston Area during the Academic Term
Students living in the Kingston area during the academic term who are enrolled in either Queen’s on-campus or online classes, or both, must write their mid-year and final examinations on the Kingston campus.

Students may not request to write an exam for an on-campus course at a different location, except in the case of extenuating circumstances.

Students Living outside the Kingston Area during the Academic Term
Students living outside the Kingston area who are enrolled in Queen’s online classes will write their mid-year and final examinations either:

  • In-person at an approved off-campus examination centre; or
  • Online using an approved online proctoring service.

Whether an exam is written in person or online is at the discretion of the instructor. Students may not request to write an in-person exam online, or vice versa.

Examination Centres for Online Classes
For students living outside the Kingston area, the Program Manager will arrange for the exam to be written within 100 km of the student’s location. Students must advise the Program Manger as to their location no later than the end of the Add/Drop period for the course (i.e. the first two weeks of class).

Extenuating Circumstances Affecting Final and Mid-Year Examinations

Students who are unable to write an examination at the scheduled time due to extenuating circumstances, beyond their control (such as serious illness, death in the family), should make arrangements with the instructor to write a deferred examination.  For more information, see Academic Consideration for Students with Extenuating Circumstances. Please note that personal plans do not qualify as extenuating circumstances under this policy.

Students who are unable to write an examination in an online class at the scheduled time due to extenuating circumstances, beyond their control, must also notify the Program Manager.

Extenuating Circumstances Warranting an Early Examination
Normally students are not permitted to write an examination at a time earlier than the scheduled time.

Students seeking permission to write an examination at an earlier time than the scheduled time due to extenuating circumstances must make a written request to their instructor.

Extenuating Circumstances Occurring Immediately Prior to an Examination
Students who experience sudden illness or other extenuating circumstances, beyond their control, immediately prior to a scheduled examination, should not write the examination. Instead, students in such circumstances should submit a request for academic consideration prior to the examination start time. Once the request has been made and as soon as they are able, students must contact their instructor(s) to make arrangements to write a deferred examination.

Students who are unable to attend or no longer require their accommodated exam(s) (scheduled with the Exams Office) must cancel their arrangements, in writing, with the Exams Office to avoid being charged a fee.

Students should remain available to write the deferred examination at the examination venue on short notice.

Extenuating Circumstances Occurring During an In-Person Examination
Once a student begins an examination, the attempt will be considered valid except in the case of extenuating circumstances. Students who experience sudden serious illness during the course of writing a scheduled examination that prevents them from completing the examination, must notify an Examination Proctor prior to leaving the examination hall. The Commerce Office will review the Examination Proctor’s report, and liaise with the instructor of the course to determine if the examination attempt is considered valid. If a student leaves an examination without notifying an Examination Proctor, and is unable to provide evidence of extenuating circumstances, the examination attempt will be considered valid and no retroactive academic consideration will be possible.

If, after consultation with the instructor, the examination attempt is not considered to be valid, permission for the student to re-write the final examination may be granted, at the discretion of the instructor and/or Executive Director (or delegate), with documentation of the extenuating circumstances.

Extenuating Circumstances Occurring During an Online Examination
Once a student begins an online examination, the attempt will be considered valid except in the case of extenuating circumstances. Students who experience sudden serious illness during the course of the examination that prevents them from completing the examination must notify the instructor and the Program Manager as soon as possible. The Commerce Office will review the Proctor’s report, if one is available, and liaise with the instructor of the course to determine if the examination attempt is considered valid. If a student is unable to provide evidence of extenuating circumstances, the examination attempt will be considered valid and no retroactive academic consideration will be possible.

If, after consultation with the instructor, the examination attempt is not considered to be valid, permission for the student to re-write the final examination may be granted, at the discretion of the instructor and/or Executive Director (or delegate), with documentation of the extenuating circumstances.

Supplemental Examinations

A student may petition an instructor for permission to take a Supplemental Examination. The result obtained on a Supplemental Examination may be substituted for that of the previous examination in calculating the final grade for the course. Normally, permission will be granted only if there have been extenuating circumstances adversely affecting a student's performance on the previous examination. Official Documentation may be required.

Examination Conduct

Students should familiarize themselves with the University Registrar’s regulations on Conduct During Exams.

6.7 Queen’s University Code of Conduct

Queen’s University is dedicated to learning, intellectual inquiry, the dissemination and advancement of knowledge, personal and professional development, and good citizenship.

Students are responsible individuals and members of society with rights and responsibilities as learners and citizens in the communities in which they learn and live.

In becoming a member of the Queen’s community, every student accepts the University’s policies, rules and procedures and acknowledges the right of the University to set standards of conduct, as well as the right of the University and/or its Authorized Agent(s) to impose sanctions for conduct found to have violated those standards.

Students are expected to adhere to and promote the University’s core values of honesty, trust, fairness, respect and personal responsibility in all aspects of University life, academic and non-academic.

It is these core values that are intended to inform and guide student conduct as they foster mutual respect for the dignity, property, rights and well-being of others.

For more information see the Student Code of Conduct.

Non-Academic Misconduct

The University is committed to a developmental and educational response to student misconduct. The University is a place for Student growth and development. The non-academic misconduct system at Queen’s (“NAM System”) is part of that broader learning environment; the process for responding to non- academic misconduct seeks to take into account the well-being of each student and the safety and well-being of the community, and encourages informal resolution.

The principles of development, deterrence, restitution, and where appropriate, Restorative Justice, will guide decision-makers within the NAM System.

Sanctions under the NAM System are intended to be educational rather than punitive whenever appropriate.

This Student Code of Conduct (“Code”) outlines the kinds of activities and behaviours that constitute non-academic student misconduct and associated sanctions.

For more information see Non-Academic Misconduct.

Professionalism and Facilities Etiquette

All study and work spaces provided by Smith School of Business should be treated with respect and care. All students are expected to use the facilities in Goodes Hall for the purposes for which they are intended, and to leave spaces clean, tidy, in the proper furniture configuration and with the room supplies.