Queen's Active Learning Classrooms

Queen's

Active Learning Classrooms

Active Learning Classrooms

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Background

For the past several years, Queen's has been committed to enhancing the student learning experience by creating new teaching and learning spaces designed for active and collaborative learning. Active learning is best supported by flat, flexible classrooms featuring appropriate technology. 

A Quick History

2011

The University’s Teaching Space Committee starts reviewing how underutilized classrooms on the 3rd floor of Ellis Hall might be reconfigured into active learning spaces.

2012

Generous donations to Queen’s fund a pilot project in Ellis Hall that would inform the University’s future teaching space projects.

2012-13

Extensive consultation takes place with academic colleagues from across the University, the Centre for Teaching and Learning, IT Services, the Timetabling Office, Campus Planning and Physical Plant Services.

2014

Three active learning spaces open in January in Ellis Hall (Ellis Hall 319, 321, and 333).

2014-15

Evaluations of the new classrooms yield overwhelmingly positive results from instructors and students.

2015-16

Two flexible seating tutorial/seminar classrooms open in Theological Hall (Theological Hall 203 and 209).

2017

Construction begins on two flexible seating tutorial/seminar classrooms (Mackintosh-Corry Hall A309 and A311) and two low-tech, team-based learning classrooms (Kingston Hall 313 and Mackintosh-Corry Hall D201), set to open in Fall 2017.

2018

In 2018, an additional two rooms in Ellis Hall are opened; a new low-tech, team-based learning classroom (Ellis 226) and a high-tech team-based classroom (Ellis 324).

 

Goals of the project

  • Create flexible learning spaces to enable active and collaborative learning

  • Encourage experimentation and innovation in course design and classroom activities

  • Provide instructors with integrated support for both pedagogy and technology

  • Evaluate how these rooms are used in order to gain knowledge that can be applied to other teaching and learning contexts and spaces