Department News

CYANOBACTERIAL HARMFUL algal blooms (CHABs) are increasing in severity on a worldwide basis. Combining nutrientsource control with post-bloom control is currently considered the best strategy for dealing with CHABs (1). However, huge investments in this strategy have proven ineffective in China, as demonstrated by yet another massive bloom last summer in Lake Tai despite over 100 billion RMB (more than US$16.25 billion) invested since 2007 (2).

For graduate students juggling research, writing and teaching, finding time to get job experience can be tough. To help students get a leg up, the Department of English Language and Literature have another option in the curriculum: internships.

Queen's University is developing a new Masters degree program focused on Earth and Energy Resources Leadership. This program is designed for working professionals to enhance the skill sets needed to make sound, effective project decisions while responsibly managing trade-offs due to the uncertainty and complexity inherent in natural resource development.

QSR Prof James Miller will give three lectures in California this month about his research on religion, culture and nature in contemporary China.

A Canadian leader in bullying prevention, Queen’s University researcher Wendy Craig was honoured today with the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada’s Impact Award.  

The awards are designed to build on and sustain Canada’s research-based knowledge culture in the social sciences and humanities. The awards recognize outstanding researchers and celebrate their achievements in research, research training, knowledge mobilization and outreach activities.

Students in RELS 227 Religions of Native People discussed the plight of aboriginal women and girls when Kingston and Islands MPP Sophie Kiwala visited their class on November 12th.

Kiwala spoke about the need for a national public inquiry into missing and murdered Canadian aboriginal women and girls.

Instructor Jason Kelly reported that the students were very engaged and motivated by the talk.

ONE CULTURE, or THE COMMONALITIES AND DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE ARTS AND THE SCIENCES

The claim of a rift between scientists and technologists on one hand, and humanists
on the other, is criticized on several grounds. Using examples from chemistry, poetry,
painting and ceramics a case is made for an underlying unity of science and the arts.
The common elements of these human activities are creation with craftsmanship,
concisely communicated, in a cross-cultural and altruistic way, with aesthetics figuring

Queen’s students got an inside view of all the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts (also known as “the Isabel”) has to offer on Saturday during a special open house.

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We made the list created by the Huffington Post!

Yoga in India and the West -- A class that surveys the history and philosophy of yoga in India and the West.

Women actually might be more turned on by visual stimuli than men, they're just less likely to talk about it. Meredith Chivers, a researcher and professor at Queen's University, researched men and women's responses to erotic material, and found that women respond physically to a wider range of erotic imagery.

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