Department News

Barbara Reeves’ team of archaeologists accidently stumbled upon the first of 157 ancient images just days before leaving the Humayma excavation site in Jordan.  

Humayma – located in western Jordan – has been an excavation site since 1986. Even though researchers have conducted many archaeological surveys in and around the area for years, the numerous carvings on the rocks, known as petroglyphs, remained undiscovered until this summer.

The School of Computing's Dr. David Skillicorn is featured in the Kingston Whig Standard's coverage of recent technology leaks.

The privacy breach that happened this past weekend to actor Jennifer Lawrence and other Hollywood celebrities could happen again unless the technology to protect passwords is improved, says a Queen's University professor.

Staff at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts received a very special delivery this morning: a Steinway concert grand piano.

Renowned for their quality, Steinway pianos grace the stages of performance halls around the world and have been celebrated by artists from Glenn Gould to Billy Joel. A Steinway grand piano is made from over 12,000 individual parts, and typically takes nearly a year to make.

A Queen’s University graduate is in the running for one of Britain’s most prestigious art awards.

Ciara Phillips (Artsci’00) is one of four artists who made the shortlist for the Turner Prize earlier this year.

Currently living in Glasgow, Scotland, Ms. Phillips received a Bachelor of Fine Art at Queen’s before earning a Master of Fine Art in 2004 at the Glasgow School of Art.

Jason Millar, a PhD Candidate in the Department of Philosophy, spends a lot of time thinking about driverless cars. Though you aren’t likely to be able to buy them for 10 years, he says there are a number of ethical problems that need to be tackled before they go mainstream.

Brandon Turner leans over his keyboard and with a few key strokes shows what he’s spent this summer working on. A digital rendering of an enormous vertebra fossil appears on his computer screen, followed by a chipped femur and then the hulking skull of a haudrosaur, the duck-billed dinosaur of the Cretaceous period.

Here’s what kids at play have always liked to do: Race, climb, wrestle, hang, throw, balance, fence with sticks, jump from heights and gravitate toward sharp objects. Ideally, while escaping the watchful eye of grown-ups.

Here’s what today’s kids hear when they’re even flirting with such pursuits: Slow down, get down, put that down. No throwing, no sticks allowed, don’t jump from there. Don’t touch, that’s too dangerous, be careful. And for goodness sake, don’t go anywhere without an adult.

Nigel Smith (Director, SNOLAB) discusses SNOLAB on CTV Northern Ontario.

Tomorrow the Canadian Real Estate Association will announce home sales volume and price data for July and Queen’s real estate expert John Andrew is available to comment on these numbers.

Deep-sea sharks wield some surprisingly well-adapted eyes that help them see in the dark, according to new research.

Transparent patches of skin above their eyes and a unique arrangement of light-sensitive cells on their retinas, among other things, allow five species of bioluminescent deep-sea shark to collect and focus as much light as possible to hunt prey and find each other in the gloomy depths.

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