Chemistry

Each year, teaching awards at Queen’s University are conferred to educators and staff who have excelled in fostering innovative, interesting, and inclusive learning environments.

In particular, the past year has been particularly challenging for the university’s instructors as the majority of programs and courses had to be switched to remote formats in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

International Women’s Day – March 8 – is an opportunity to recognize women’s achievements in our community and around the world. It is also a time to take measure of the ongoing efforts to achieve equity for women.

As Queen’s University and the Faculty of Arts and Science marks International Women’s Day, the Gazette takes a look back at some of the key accomplishments, events, and women – mentors and role models, visionaries and trailblazers, leaders and supporters, faculty, students and staff – who have helped make a difference over the past 12 months.

International Day of Women and Girls in Science 2021 is an opportunity to recognize the achievements of women working in science and the motivation they are providing for young women just beginning or in the early stages of their careers.

The Faculty of Arts and Science celebrates 166 student-athletes as all-stars

A total of 426 student-athletes have been named Academic All-Stars, including 166 from the Faculty of Arts and Science. These student-athletes have achieved an 80 per cent average (3.5 GPA) or above over the past academic year and compete on a varsity team or varsity club.

This is a record high number and places Queen’s among the top five schools in Canada for the number of Academic All-Stars.

P. Andrew Evans is the first researcher at a Canadian university to earn the Harry and Carol Mosher Award

Graeme HoweGraeme Howe, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry, has been recognized by the Province of Ontario with a 2020 Polanyi Prize.

 

It has been a year like no other yet staff across Queen’s University have stepped up to the challenges created by COVID-19.

On Thursday, Dec. 10, Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane recognized a number of staff for their accomplishments and contributions with the announcement of the 2020 Special Recognition for Staff Awards.

Royal Society of Canada elects two Queen’s University researchers as Fellows, and two to the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists.

Four Queen’s University researchers have been elected to the Royal Society of Canada, which is one of the highest recognitions for Canadian academics in the arts, humanities, and the social and natural sciences. Nancy van Deusen, and Cathleen Crudden were elected to the Fellowship of the academy, while Amy Latimer-Cheung and Awet Weldemichael were named members of the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists.

Eighteen researchers at Queen’s University receive funding from the CFI’s John R. Evans Leaders Fund.

Queen’s University has been awarded over $2.8 million in funding in the latest rounds of the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s (CFI) John R. Evans Leaders Fund (JELF). The money will help fund 18 projects at the university. 

Dr. Richard Oleschuk (Acting Department Head, Department of Chemistry), joined CTV News Ottawa this week to discuss the work that Queen's and its students are doing to help manufacture hand sanitizer for local Kingston hospitals. 

Watch the Interview

An interdisciplinary team of Queen’s researchers and industry partners have mobilized to formulate hand sanitizer for Kingston hospitals

IGnite: Research Stories to Inspire Generations will feature talks on neutrinos, fundamental building blocks of the universe, and molecular interactions

At this year’s Spring Convocation, Queen’s University is bestowing its highest form of recognition for research excellence to five faculty members.

Alfred Bader

Cathleen Crudden, a professor and researcher in the Department of Chemistry, has been named the winner of the 2019 Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award in celebration of her outstanding achievements in the field of organic chemistry.

A national body has recognized a Queen’s professor for her outstanding mentorship of graduate students.

Suning Wang of the Department of Chemistry has received the inaugural Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS) Award for Outstanding Graduate Mentorship.

Queen's Chemistry PhD Student Caitlin Miron has won the 2017 Mitacs PhD Award for Outstanding Innovation. Ms. Miron has discovered a DNA binder that, in essence, prevents cancer cells from spreading.

Matthias Hermann is the first student to graduate from the dual master's degree program in Chemistry offered through a partnership between Queen's University and Universität Stuttgart in Germany.

Researcher Richard Oleschuk and Trajan Scientific and Medical (Trajan) in Australia are collaborating on the development of the next generation of biochemical instrumentation that will improve the detection of diseases such as cancer.

Dr. Oleschuk (Chemistry) has developed a microscopic straw-shaped glass instrument that can efficiently generate and spray nanometer-sized droplets into spectrometers capable of analyzing biomarkers.

Adam Sage, the Head Gael and a fourth year Biochemistry student at Queen's shares his photo-blog below.

Year 1

Year 2

ONE CULTURE, or THE COMMONALITIES AND DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE ARTS AND THE SCIENCES

The claim of a rift between scientists and technologists on one hand, and humanists
on the other, is criticized on several grounds. Using examples from chemistry, poetry,
painting and ceramics a case is made for an underlying unity of science and the arts.
The common elements of these human activities are creation with craftsmanship,
concisely communicated, in a cross-cultural and altruistic way, with aesthetics figuring

Nine Queen’s University faculty members have been elected to the Royal Society of Canada, the highest number of inductees the university has had in one year. Fellowship in the RSC is one of the highest recognitions for Canadian academics in the arts, humanities, and the social and natural sciences. Seven of the nine electees are from the Faculty of Arts and Science!

Forget heavy metal, they're talking light metal at Queen's University. Well, at least a light coating for metal anyway.

Queen's University chemistry professors Dr. Crudden and Dr. Horton teamed up two years ago to find a practical use for an organic to bond with metal.

Watch this video to learn more about how this discovery can be applied to everyday use.

Queen’s University researchers Cathleen Crudden and Hugh Horton (Chemistry), along with students, postdoctoral fellows and other collaborators have developed a new process that allows organic compounds to bind to metal surfaces. This cutting-edge technology is now being patented and commercialized by PARTEQ and Green Centre Canada.