English Language & Literature

Each year, teaching awards at Queen’s University are conferred to educators and staff who have excelled in fostering innovative, interesting, and inclusive learning environments.

In particular, the past year has been particularly challenging for the university’s instructors as the majority of programs and courses had to be switched to remote formats in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Queen’s University Writer in Residence Kaie Kellough, the Department of English, and the Faculty of Arts and Science are joining forces to present three unique events including a conversation with the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize winner Souvankham Thammavongsa, author of How to Pronounce Knife.

The Faculty of Arts and Science celebrates 166 student-athletes as all-stars

A total of 426 student-athletes have been named Academic All-Stars, including 166 from the Faculty of Arts and Science. These student-athletes have achieved an 80 per cent average (3.5 GPA) or above over the past academic year and compete on a varsity team or varsity club.

This is a record high number and places Queen’s among the top five schools in Canada for the number of Academic All-Stars.

This year, 18 researchers from across the Faculty of Arts and Science were named as recipients of Insight Grant funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). 

Note: This article was originally written and published by Phil Gaudreau in the Queen's Gazette.

The Faculty of Arts and Science has announced the recipients of its pre-doctoral fellowships for Indigenous graduate students.

Among the Principal’s Dream Courses funded last year, two courses were specifically focused on sharing Indigenous knowledge.

Heather Macfarlane, Assistant Adjunct Professor in the Department of English, has just recently completed the first offering of ENGL218: Introduction to Indigenous Literature in Canada. The course examined Indigenous novels, traditional stories, poetry, short stories and plays from various time periods, written by Métis, Inuit and First Nations authors.

Andre Alexis, winner of the 2015 Scotiabank Giller Prize, visited Queen’s University on Tuesday to deliver a guest lecture and take part in a book signing. Mr. Alexis kept a packed audience at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre riveted as he discussed the inspiration for writing Fifteen Dogs, which included a local tie.

For graduate students juggling research, writing and teaching, finding time to get job experience can be tough. To help students get a leg up, the Department of English Language and Literature have another option in the curriculum: internships.

Dr. Robert Morrison of the Department of English has been nominated for a top British literary award for his biography of Thomas De Quincey, The English Opium Eater: A Biography of Thomas De Quincey.

“I am gobsmacked,” Morrison said in a news release. “Being shortlisted for the oldest literary prize in Britain seems impossible. I am absolutely elated.”