History

Throughout 2022–2023, the Black Studies program is hosting a series of screenings, conversations, and celebrations to mark the launch of the new interdisciplinary program at Queen’s University. This past weekend, the Black Studies Collective (Taylor Cenac, Katherine McKittrick, Daniel McNeil, Dalitso Ruwe, and Vanessa Thompson) hosted two events: an evening of art, music, poetry, and film on Friday to celebrate the inauguration of Black Studies at Queen’s, and a celebration of new research and books in Black Studies on Saturday.

With the announcement of the Standing Whale project last fall, the Faculty of Arts and Science is preparing to offer students in the humanities, social science, creative arts and natural sciences the opportunity to engage with this unique art installation through the interdisciplinary projects course ASCX 400.   

Ten ‘blue sky’ courses have been selected for the Principal’s Impact Courses (PIC) initiative this year. The programs will use funding creatively to support the development of educational experiences that push the boundaries of teaching and learning.

Courses receiving funding range in topic from impact-driven leadership to the effect of humanitarian crises on health and health systems.

It’s plan selection time in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Students are busy making the important decision of which area of study they wish to pursue during their time at Queen’s University.

From now until May 27, students who have completed 24 units or more must declare their plan in SOLUS. For upper-year students this may involve requesting to change their degree program.


Left to right: Lara Aluko and Carli LaPierre

Sunday marks the United Nations World Day of Social Justice – an international day recognizing the need to promote social justice, which includes efforts to tackle issues such as poverty, exclusion, gender inequality, unemployment, human rights, and social protections.

A total of 502 student-athletes have been named Academic All-Stars, including 206 undergraduate and eight graduate students from the Faculty of Arts and Science, an increase of 40 over last year in FAS. These student-athletes have achieved an 80 per cent average (3.5 GPA) or above over the past academic year and compete on a varsity team or varsity club.

The Government of Canada announces support for Queen's researchers through the federal funding agencies and the Canada Research Chair program.

International Women’s Day – March 8 – is an opportunity to recognize women’s achievements in our community and around the world. It is also a time to take measure of the ongoing efforts to achieve equity for women.

As Queen’s University and the Faculty of Arts and Science marks International Women’s Day, the Gazette takes a look back at some of the key accomplishments, events, and women – mentors and role models, visionaries and trailblazers, leaders and supporters, faculty, students and staff – who have helped make a difference over the past 12 months.

The Faculty of Arts and Science celebrates 166 student-athletes as all-stars

A total of 426 student-athletes have been named Academic All-Stars, including 166 from the Faculty of Arts and Science. These student-athletes have achieved an 80 per cent average (3.5 GPA) or above over the past academic year and compete on a varsity team or varsity club.

This is a record high number and places Queen’s among the top five schools in Canada for the number of Academic All-Stars.

Dr. Jacalyn Duffin earns honour for her leadership role in the field of medical history

Professor emerita Jacalyn Duffin was recently appointed to the Order of Canada, one of Canada’s highest civilian honours. The announcement was made by Governor General Julie Payette.

Sean Marrs presents on his research into state surveillance in 18th century Paris during the Matariki Network of Universities Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition.
Sean Marrs presents on his research into state surveillance in 18th century Paris during the Matariki Network of Universities Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition.

Royal Society of Canada elects two Queen’s University researchers as Fellows, and two to the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists.

Four Queen’s University researchers have been elected to the Royal Society of Canada, which is one of the highest recognitions for Canadian academics in the arts, humanities, and the social and natural sciences. Nancy van Deusen, and Cathleen Crudden were elected to the Fellowship of the academy, while Amy Latimer-Cheung and Awet Weldemichael were named members of the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists.

This year’s recipients of the Distinguished Service Award are a group of faculty and staff members who have made a lasting impact throughout their outstanding careers at Queen’s University.

Selected by the University Council Executive Committee, the award recognizes exemplary service to Queen’s University over an extended period of time. 

A student in the Department of History was one of the first ever at Queen's to defend her dissertation remotely.

At this year’s Spring Convocation, Queen’s University is bestowing its highest form of recognition for research excellence to five faculty members.

Last fall, experts and audience members gathered at Queen’s University to discuss the future of research, knowledge sharing, and the student learning experience in the digital age at the first-ever Principal’s Symposium.

Alfred Bader

Note: This article was originally written and published by Phil Gaudreau in the Queen's Gazette.

The Faculty of Arts and Science has announced the recipients of its pre-doctoral fellowships for Indigenous graduate students.

Steven Maynard’s courses in Canadian history are “not your typical history classes.”

Instead of relying on textbooks or readings regarding the past, with students handing in a paper or writing an exam, Mr. Maynard develops a project based around a particular segment of Canadian history that requires students to research, create and present.

My book, Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe: Henrietta Maria and Marie Antoinette examines the debate surrounding these two controversial queens consort as wives, mothers and mistresses of royal households during the years preceding the English Civil Wars of the 1640s and the French Revolution in the late-18th century, respectively. The book manuscript developed from research undertaken over the course of my MA and PhD in the Department of History at Queen’s University.

The W.J Barnes teaching excellence award of the Arts & Science Undergraduate Society is considered the highest tribute the Society can pay to an individual for teaching excellence. The award is presented to deserving members of the Faculty of Arts and Science who have made a significant contribution to teaching.

This year's recipient of the award is Laura Carlson from the Department of History.  Laura has gone above and beyond in educating and engaging with her students throughout this year.

Congratulations Laura!

Students in Steven Maynard’s “History of Sexuality in Canada” (HIST 210) class are taking an in-depth look at Queen’s history of tackling sexual violence on campus.

At Queen’s, principals, deans, rectors, faculty, staff and students have all grappled with the topic of sexual assault for close to four decades and, in many cases, implemented preventative measures and responsive initiatives, which are highlighted in a display in the foyer of Kathleen Ryan Hall.

Students in Steven Maynard’s “History of Sexuality in Canada” (HIST 210) class are taking an in-depth look at Queen’s history of tackling sexual violence on campus.

At Queen’s, principals, deans, rectors, faculty, staff and students have all grappled with the topic of sexual assault for close to four decades and, in many cases, implemented preventative measures and responsive initiatives, which are highlighted in a display in the foyer of Kathleen Ryan Hall.

Nine Queen’s University faculty members have been elected to the Royal Society of Canada, the highest number of inductees the university has had in one year. Fellowship in the RSC is one of the highest recognitions for Canadian academics in the arts, humanities, and the social and natural sciences. Seven of the nine electees are from the Faculty of Arts and Science!

Middle East Professor Ariel Salzmann and activist Azeezah Kanji cite specific examples of how Canadian media has misrepresented the ongoing assault and how the Harper government aims to fuel this conflict to ensure high prices for Tar Sands oil.

Ofyn Veg: A Symposium on Canadian Jewish Studies in Honour of Gerald Tulchinsky will be held next month at the University of Toronto's Centre for Jewish Studies. Dr. Tulchinsky is a Queen's professor emeritus of history and a leading scholar in the area of Jewish studies in Canada.

The Yiddish phrase Ofyn Veg, which means “on the road,” is a fitting way to describe Dr. Tulchinsky’s exploration and scholarship into the Jewish experience in Canada.