Psychology

Sari van Anders, Canada 150 Research Chair in Social Neuroendocrinology, Sexuality, and Gender/Sex & Professor of Psychology, Gender Studies, & Neuroscience co-authored 2019 American Psychologist article on “The future of sex and gender in psychology: Five challenges to the gender binary” has won the 2020 Distinguished Publication Award from the Association for Women in Psychology (AWP).

The funded projects involve a range of research, including investigating the building blocks of constructing gender and race in primary education, and testing for independent experts to improve Canada’s federal transfer system.

Eighteen researchers at Queen’s University receive funding from the CFI’s John R. Evans Leaders Fund.

Queen’s University has been awarded over $2.8 million in funding in the latest rounds of the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s (CFI) John R. Evans Leaders Fund (JELF). The money will help fund 18 projects at the university. 

This year, 18 researchers from across the Faculty of Arts and Science were named as recipients of Insight Grant funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). 

Canadian Institutes of Health Research funds $3.95 million in grants to seven Queen’s Researchers.

Seven Queen’s University researchers are contributing their knowledge in the areas of melanoma, intensive care unit survivors, postoperative pain, diabetes medication, Indigenous public health, and depression thanks to funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

New research from Queen’s University says the answer depends on your culture.

New research from Queen’s University has revealed the way people evaluate an opponent in a competition can be drastically different depending on cultures.

Three academics honoured for their work on bullying, mental health, and the Arctic.

Wednesday April 10th was Honours Thesis Research Day for 52 Honours students in the PSYC 501 course. The presentation day in the Biosciences Atrium was the culmination of a years’ worth of research and extensive lab work.

Jill Atkinson (Psychology) knows that she is joining some very select company.

Dr. Atkinson is the 2016 recipient of the Chancellor A. Charles Baillie Teaching Award, which recognizes undergraduate, graduate or professional teaching that has had an outstanding influence on the quality of student learning at Queen’s University.

Erin Robinson Swink, Artsci’08, was a first-year psychology student in 2004 living in Adelaide Hall when she started designing video games as a way to avoid studying for exams.

Surprisingly that procrastination has evolved into a successful career as in independent video game designer.

Queen’s researcher Wendy Craig invested in the Order of Ontario.

In recognition of her continuing work in the field of bullying prevention and the promotion of healthy relationships, Wendy Craig (Psychology) has been invested to the Order of Ontario.

What makes humans attractive to other humans?

Queen’s University Professor Nikolaus Troje (Psychology, Biology, School of Computing) believes that it is the consistency of the whole appearance rather than the attractiveness of the parts.

“Most previous work on attractiveness focused on the effect of isolated features.” says Dr. Troje. “The current study demonstrates how important it is that these features fit together well.”

Along with Dr. Giacomin, Queen’s has two new Tier 2 CRCs and five renewals. Jordan Poppenk (Psychology) has been named the Tier 2 NSERC Chair in Cognitive Neuroimaging and Grégoire Webber (Law) is the new Tier 2 Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Chair (SSHRC) in Public Law and Philosophy of Law.

Dr. Poppenk’s research focuses on bringing memories to life. Using emerging brain imaging methods, he observes how memories interact and links these interactions to participants’ brain anatomy.

A Canadian leader in bullying prevention, Queen’s University researcher Wendy Craig was honoured today with the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada’s Impact Award.  

The awards are designed to build on and sustain Canada’s research-based knowledge culture in the social sciences and humanities. The awards recognize outstanding researchers and celebrate their achievements in research, research training, knowledge mobilization and outreach activities.

Nine Queen’s University faculty members have been elected to the Royal Society of Canada, the highest number of inductees the university has had in one year. Fellowship in the RSC is one of the highest recognitions for Canadian academics in the arts, humanities, and the social and natural sciences. Seven of the nine electees are from the Faculty of Arts and Science!

Women actually might be more turned on by visual stimuli than men, they're just less likely to talk about it. Meredith Chivers, a researcher and professor at Queen's University, researched men and women's responses to erotic material, and found that women respond physically to a wider range of erotic imagery.

Deep-sea sharks wield some surprisingly well-adapted eyes that help them see in the dark, according to new research.

Transparent patches of skin above their eyes and a unique arrangement of light-sensitive cells on their retinas, among other things, allow five species of bioluminescent deep-sea shark to collect and focus as much light as possible to hunt prey and find each other in the gloomy depths.

PSYC 100 has been redesigned.  The new PSYC 100 brings students together two hours per week instead of three; one hour for a lecture and one hour to work though activities in small tutorial groups.

In recent years, we have become concerned about the level of student engagement in PSYC 100. Student engagement is the result of active and collaborative learning, something that is hard to achieve in a large introductory course such as the Principles of Psychology with its 450-700 students per section!