Religious Studies

Ten ‘blue sky’ courses have been selected for the Principal’s Impact Courses (PIC) initiative this year. The programs will use funding creatively to support the development of educational experiences that push the boundaries of teaching and learning.

Courses receiving funding range in topic from impact-driven leadership to the effect of humanitarian crises on health and health systems.

It’s plan selection time in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Students are busy making the important decision of which area of study they wish to pursue during their time at Queen’s University.

From now until May 27, students who have completed 24 units or more must declare their plan in SOLUS. For upper-year students this may involve requesting to change their degree program.

A total of 502 student-athletes have been named Academic All-Stars, including 206 undergraduate and eight graduate students from the Faculty of Arts and Science, an increase of 40 over last year in FAS. These student-athletes have achieved an 80 per cent average (3.5 GPA) or above over the past academic year and compete on a varsity team or varsity club.

Each year, teaching awards at Queen’s University are conferred to educators and staff who have excelled in fostering innovative, interesting, and inclusive learning environments.

In particular, the past year has been particularly challenging for the university’s instructors as the majority of programs and courses had to be switched to remote formats in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Note: This article was originally written by Leigh Cameron in the Queen's Gazette

Galen Watts (Cultural Studies) secures one of five top spots in the 2018 SSHRC Storytellers contest.

Congratulations to Dr. Richard Ascough, Faculty of Arts and Science Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning) for being named one of the 2018 3M National Teaching Fellows for his imaginative, experiential work as a Queen's School of Religion Professor.

Queen’s University post doctoral fellow Valerie Michaelson is exploring research around adolescents and spiritual health.  While spiritual health has long been recognized as important to health and well-being, there has been renewed interest in understanding what it is, and how it relates to the health of young people.

In a cross-national analysis, her team found that the importance of spiritual health decreases as children age, but for those who maintain its importance, the strong and positive health benefits are very provocative.

QSR Prof James Miller will give three lectures in California this month about his research on religion, culture and nature in contemporary China.

Students in RELS 227 Religions of Native People discussed the plight of aboriginal women and girls when Kingston and Islands MPP Sophie Kiwala visited their class on November 12th.

Kiwala spoke about the need for a national public inquiry into missing and murdered Canadian aboriginal women and girls.

Instructor Jason Kelly reported that the students were very engaged and motivated by the talk.

Julia Marsala (Artsci’14) is from a small farm town in Pennsylvania, so when she stepped into the megalopolis of Shanghai, with its more than 23 million people, she felt a little overstimulated, a little overwhelmed.

 “The sheer number of people on the streets – it was nothing I’d ever seen. It was culture shock, but not in a bad way,” she says. “The city and China in general forces you out of your comfort zone, and when you do that, you learn a lot about yourself.”