Kinesiology and Health Studies


Students in Samantha King's HLTH 334 The Politics of Health and Illness course are taking a closer look at COVID-19 and its wide-ranging affects while it is still happening. (Unsplash/Dmitri Karastelev)

Royal Society of Canada elects two Queen’s University researchers as Fellows, and two to the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists.

Four Queen’s University researchers have been elected to the Royal Society of Canada, which is one of the highest recognitions for Canadian academics in the arts, humanities, and the social and natural sciences. Nancy van Deusen, and Cathleen Crudden were elected to the Fellowship of the academy, while Amy Latimer-Cheung and Awet Weldemichael were named members of the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists.

The funded projects involve a range of research, including investigating the building blocks of constructing gender and race in primary education, and testing for independent experts to improve Canada’s federal transfer system.

Queen's attracts six Vanier Canada Graduate Scholars and one Banting Post-Doctoral Fellow through national programs.

This year, 18 researchers from across the Faculty of Arts and Science were named as recipients of Insight Grant funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). 

How the university's researchers are sharing their expertise to help us understand and cope with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Queen's researchers are sharing their expertise during the COVID-19 pandemic, offering commentary and analysis. (Unsplash / Austin Distel)

How the university's researchers are sharing their expertise to help us understand and cope with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Queen's researchers are sharing their expertise during the COVID-19 pandemic, offering commentary and analysis. (Unsplash / Austin Distel)

Canadian Institutes of Health Research funds $3.95 million in grants to seven Queen’s Researchers.

Seven Queen’s University researchers are contributing their knowledge in the areas of melanoma, intensive care unit survivors, postoperative pain, diabetes medication, Indigenous public health, and depression thanks to funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Open for registrations now, Arts and Science has launched 7 new certificates that are open to Queen's students this fall. Certificates help students add breadth to their degree so their resumes are more competitive upon graduation. All of the new certificates range from 12-18 units, what some call a 'snackable' credential.  These new certificates include:

Kimberley Bergeron, SKHS Adjunct and alumna, was interviewed by a reporter from the Toronto Star newspaper on Sunday September 4, 2016. The Star noted Dr. Bergeron's expertise on "how cities can use bylaws and other local powers to improve the health of residents". 

During her time at Queen’s University, Rebecca Love (Artsci’12) studied Kinesiology and Health Studies. She then spent two years working in health and education development in the Caribbean as a Pathy Family Foundation Fellow before continuing her Master’s studies at the University of Oxford.

Earlier this year, Ms. Love was awarded a prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship that will see her pursue a PhD in Medical Science at the University of Cambridge.

What started out as a class project is now changing the way doctors issue exercise prescriptions.

Exercise-Rx is a computerized exercise prescription program developed by Erica Pascoal and Aaron Gazendam during their time in KNPE 463, an undergraduate course in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies. The program was created in collaboration with the Queen’s-established Exercise is Medicine (EIM) initiative and is now used daily by the Loyalist Family Health Team in Amherstview.

Here’s what kids at play have always liked to do: Race, climb, wrestle, hang, throw, balance, fence with sticks, jump from heights and gravitate toward sharp objects. Ideally, while escaping the watchful eye of grown-ups.

Here’s what today’s kids hear when they’re even flirting with such pursuits: Slow down, get down, put that down. No throwing, no sticks allowed, don’t jump from there. Don’t touch, that’s too dangerous, be careful. And for goodness sake, don’t go anywhere without an adult.

Queen’s University researcher Ian Janssen (School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Department of Public Health Sciences) has earned a place on Thomson Reuters’ Highly Cited Researchers list. He is the only Queen’s professor to make the list and one of only 88 researchers working in Canada on the 3,215 member list.

The international list includes scientists and researchers whose work is most often cited in other research papers.