Computing

A true champion for women in the technology industry, Faculty of Arts and Science Professor Wendy Powley has earned yet another honour for supporting gender diversity in computing.

Computer Science Canada / Informatique Canada (CS-Can/Info-Can), a national professional organization for computer scientists that works with academic institutions, government agencies, industry, and other related professional societies to represent the computing research community and advocate for excellence in computer science education, recently honoured Powley with the Distinguished Services Award.

When most people think of artificial intelligence (AI) they picture robots from Hollywood blockbusters or science fiction, but in reality, machine learning is already being used for many real-life applications. Parvin Mousavi, a professor in the Queen's School of Computing, is one of the researchers on the forefront of AI developments and is working to advance next generation medical interventions.

A fourth year Faculty of Arts and Science student and FAS Student Ambassador has set herself up for success. Inika Chikarmane, a School of Computing student, recently completed her second internship at Microsoft and was offered a full-time job with the company upon graduation.

New fellows are recognized for their outstanding research and scholarly contributions.

An evolution of the Human Mobility Research Centre, the Centre for Health Innovation connects researchers from across disciplines to tackle the most pressing human health challenges.

It’s plan selection time in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Students are busy making the important decision of which area of study they wish to pursue during their time at Queen’s University.

From now until May 27, students who have completed 24 units or more must declare their plan in SOLUS. For upper-year students this may involve requesting to change their degree program.

Four Queen’s researchers receive $100,000 each to build new research programs.

The Government of Ontario recently announced the results for the sixteenth round of its Early Researcher Awards (ERA), which provide early-career scholars across the province with funding to build research teams. Four Queen’s researchers received $100,000 each to structure programs that will investigate topics in machine learning, agriculture, astroparticle physics, and natural products.

Queen’s receives $3 million from the New Frontiers in Research Fund programs for projects pushing the frontiers of knowledge and pioneering solutions to overcome challenges brought on by the pandemic.


Queen’s researchers are developing out-of-the-box solutions to wicked problems. 

The Three Minute Thesis graduate student competition tests the ability to present one’s research projects in a clear, concise way in only 180 seconds.

A total of 502 student-athletes have been named Academic All-Stars, including 206 undergraduate and eight graduate students from the Faculty of Arts and Science, an increase of 40 over last year in FAS. These student-athletes have achieved an 80 per cent average (3.5 GPA) or above over the past academic year and compete on a varsity team or varsity club.

The Government of Canada announces support for Queen's researchers through the federal funding agencies and the Canada Research Chair program.

Six research projects at Queen’s have received funding from the New Frontiers in Research Fund’s (NFRF) 2020 Exploration competition, a program that encourages scholars to take risks, and that fosters discoveries and innovations that could have significant impacts on our world.

Each year, teaching awards at Queen’s University are conferred to educators and staff who have excelled in fostering innovative, interesting, and inclusive learning environments.

In particular, the past year has been particularly challenging for the university’s instructors as the majority of programs and courses had to be switched to remote formats in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Forty undergraduate and graduate students in the Faculty of Arts and Science (FAS) have received funding from the Mitacs Research Training award, FAS, and Queen’s. Mitacs provided half of the funding for the $6,000 award while FAS and the Office of the Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) provided the other half.

This number represents about 80 per cent of the funding received by the university from Mitacs.

The Government of Canada recently announced its investment of $118 million in funding through the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada’s (NSERC) inaugural Alliance grants program. More than $6 million was secured by 12 Queen’s researchers, with four projects awarded more than $1 million each. Of the 20 projects that received more than $1 million, Queen’s and the University of Calgary tied for attracting the largest individual investments.

International Day of Women and Girls in Science 2021 is an opportunity to recognize the achievements of women working in science and the motivation they are providing for young women just beginning or in the early stages of their careers.

Dr. Amber Simpson is the 2020 recipient of the Mihran and Mary Basmajian Award for Excellence in Health Research. The award was established by Dr. J.V. Basmajian, in memory of his parents. It is awarded annually to a member of the Faculty of Health Sciences who has made an outstanding contribution to health research over the past several years. 

The Prizes for Excellence in Research are Queen’s highest internal research award.


Michael Cunningham (Chemical Engineering), Gabor Fichtinger (Computing), and Yan-Fei Liu (Engineering) are the 2020 recipients of the Prizes for Excellence in Research.

Eighteen researchers at Queen’s University receive funding from the CFI’s John R. Evans Leaders Fund.

Queen’s University has been awarded over $2.8 million in funding in the latest rounds of the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s (CFI) John R. Evans Leaders Fund (JELF). The money will help fund 18 projects at the university. 

This year’s recipients of the Distinguished Service Award are a group of faculty and staff members who have made a lasting impact throughout their outstanding careers at Queen’s University.

Selected by the University Council Executive Committee, the award recognizes exemplary service to Queen’s University over an extended period of time. 

The IEEE Computer Society Technical Council on Software Engineering (TCSE) has awarded the 2020 TCSE New Directions Award to Dr. Ahmed Hassan of the School of Computing and Dr. Thomas Zimmermann of Microsoft Research.

Alice Santilli, a master's candidate in the School of Computing, is the Queen’s Three Minute Thesis winner with her presentation 'Sniffing out breast cancer.'

Anna Panchenko, the Tier 1 CRC in Computational Biology and Biophysics, talks about how the CRC program allows her to focus on her research, gives her research visibility among her peers, and opens the door to collaborations.

The Canadian Celebration of Women in Computing brings together leaders in research, education, and industry as well as students for inspiration and engagement.

Last weekend marked the beginning of our 50th year in the School of Computing. The festivities welcomed back our alumni, our previous department heads, and our retired faculty and staff. Together with many of our current faculty, staff, and students, we acknowledged and celebrated this community for how it has shaped the School into what we are today.

In the field of computing, efficiency and effectiveness are key. Researchers are continuously searching for solutions to the computational challenges that come with processing massive amounts of data in a timely fashion.  Selim Akl, professor in the School of Computing and a pioneer of parallel computation, has garnered worldwide recognition for his success in finding efficient and improved solutions to this issue. Recently, Dr.

2018 was a year filled with the groundbreaking work and achievements of the many amazing, inspiring women at Queen’s.  As a current female ArtSci student, I have been blown away by how much women have accomplished within every industry this year, both here at Queen’s and beyond. My personal favourite moments from the past year that I would like to highlight for International Women’s Day include the following inspiring achievements:

Hillary Lia - a third year undergraduate student in the Biomedical Computing Honour's Program, and the youngest of all nominees - has been named as Finalist for the Computing Research Association's (CRA) Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Award. Her research pertains to development of novel methods for computational surgical skill assessment and translation of those into training curricula in the Queen's Clinical Simulation Centre. 

Read More.

Queen’s faculty members awarded university’s Prize for Excellence in Research.

Five Queen’s professors have been named the 2016 recipients of the university’s Prize for Excellence in Research.

A new camp offered by Queen’s School of Computing is introducing teens to career opportunities in the field of computer science. 

Thanks to a grant from Google, Wendy Powley, a lecturer in the School of Computing and the Faculty of Education, has worked with a team of Queen’s students to create a summer coding camp for students aged 13 to 17. 

Read the full story in the Queen's Gazette.

The Queen's School of Computing has unveiled the 2015-2016 Queen's School of Computing Newsletter.

Previous year editions can be found here.

What makes humans attractive to other humans?

Queen’s University Professor Nikolaus Troje (Psychology, Biology, School of Computing) believes that it is the consistency of the whole appearance rather than the attractiveness of the parts.

“Most previous work on attractiveness focused on the effect of isolated features.” says Dr. Troje. “The current study demonstrates how important it is that these features fit together well.”

While they didn’t win the Microsoft Imagine Cup, Team Walkly is returning to Queen’s University having gained valuable experience that will help them reach the next level.

The Canadian representatives at the prestigious international event –  Riley Karson, (Cmp’17), Julie Lycklama (Cmp’17), Anastasiya Tarnouskaya (Cmp’17) and Christopher Thomas (Cmp’17) – created the Walkly app with the aim of providing a safer walking experience for everyone, anywhere, anytime by combining the power of social media and smartphone technology.

A Queen’s University researcher has received a top national award in the field of computer science.

Ahmed Hassan (Computing) recently received the Outstanding Young Computer Science Researcher Prize for 2014  from the Canadian Association of Computer Science. (University Communications)

Ahmed Hassan (Computing) is one of three recipients of the Outstanding Young Computer Science Researcher Prize for 2014 from the Canadian Association of Computer Science.

“That’s really neat” was a common refrain overheard in the Biosciences Complex on April 1 as undergraduate and graduate students showcased their work at the annual Creative Computing: Art, Games, Research event hosted by Queen’s School of Computing.

The hands-on demonstrations, presentations and posters spanned a variety of topics including game design and technology, computing and the creative arts, human-computer interaction, and more.

This year's list of Agnes Benidickson Tricolour Award Recipients was announced.

The School of Computing's Dr. David Skillicorn is featured in the Kingston Whig Standard's coverage of recent technology leaks.

The privacy breach that happened this past weekend to actor Jennifer Lawrence and other Hollywood celebrities could happen again unless the technology to protect passwords is improved, says a Queen's University professor.

Brandon Turner leans over his keyboard and with a few key strokes shows what he’s spent this summer working on. A digital rendering of an enormous vertebra fossil appears on his computer screen, followed by a chipped femur and then the hulking skull of a haudrosaur, the duck-billed dinosaur of the Cretaceous period.

Three Queen’s researchers and collaborators at seven other Canadian universities have received $16.6 million over five years for research supporting automobile software systems.

KINGSTON, ON – This week, Queen’s University’s School of Computing will host the Ontario Celebration of Women in Computing. The first in Canada held under the U.S. Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing (GHC) umbrella, it brings together students, faculty, and professionals from around the province.

Two Queen’s research projects looking at improved outcomes for joint surgery have received National Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) funding. James Stewart and Randy Ellis (School of Computing) each received close to $300,000 over the next three years.