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ARTH 116/3.0 Art and Architecture in Britain from the Classical Period to c.1700

Course applicable to the following Majors / Medials/ Minors:    ARTH (core) / COAR (core) / Con-Ed Teaching Subject (Visual Arts)
Course Instructor: Dr Ruth Cereceda - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
This course is available in:   Fall term at the BISC
Course Prerequisites / Exclusions:   When both ARTH 116 and ARTH 117 are taken they exclude ARTH 120

I love teaching this course to First Years! They are so exotic in their responses - and dare I say it, unfiltered! They are so passionate and have such a wide range of opinions and no qualms whatsoever about sharing them.

 DR RUTH CERECEDA, BISC 

Course Highlights:

Visual thinking is core to this course and you will learn to extract the information you require from the primary sources.

Dip into a number of topics that interest you. This is a discipline that fits into a number of study areas - including science, politics, history and philosophy.

We live in a world where image is important. Why do we wear black when we want to be elegant, and when we take selfies, why do we pose in a certain way? This course answers these questions and many more!

ARTH Page

ARTH 116/3.0 Art and Architecture in Britain from the Classical Period to c.1700

A chronological survey of painting, sculpture and architecture in western culture from Greece and Rome through to the early modern period. The art works will be studied at British galleries, museums and architectural monuments.

This course is designed for first year students, with no previous art history background, but is also attractive as an upper year elective to students from both the arts and humanities backgrounds as well as a counterpoint to those majoring in the sciences. It is based on classes at the BISC reinforced by two primary source visits to the National Gallery and Canterbury Cathedral.

The course traces the chronological development from Greek classical architecture and sculpture through Gothic Architecture to the Renaissance and the Baroque. The paintings that are explored on this course are from c1300 – c1650 and begin with Giotto and the Arena chapel in Padua. This is followed by a strong focus on Italian Renaissance art and sculpture while the dialogue between that and the Northern Renaissance is also discussed, and the Baroque is studied towards the end of the semester. Students are encouraged to explore the art of the National Gallery London, as well as paintings and sculptures from other major European Galleries seen in class. There are no pre-requisites for this course.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course a successful student will be able to:

  • Learn to evaluate primary source paintings and differentiate between the various periods of Romanesque and Gothic architecture, as well as sculptures and paintings from other European Galleries seen in class, and to recognize difference in style, technique and facture.
  • Address issues that relate to these images and architectural sites, by approaching them with an increased visual acumen and a stronger critical focus.
  • Understand the origins of artistic conventions and how art history has shaped the way we visualize the world today.

Experiential Learning Opportunities

Examples of previous ELOs include the National Gallery, Cantebury Cathedral, The British Museum, The Louvre and Musée D'Orsay in Paris.

Bader International Study Centre
Herstmonceux Castle
Hailsham, East Sussex
United Kingdom, BN27 1RN
Phone: +44 1323 834444
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Undergraduate Admission and Recruitment
Gordon Hall, 74 Union Street
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario
Canada, K7L 3N6
Phone: (613) 533-2218
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