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DEVS 100/6.0 Canada and the "Third World"

Course applicable to the following Majors / Medials/ Minors:    DEVS (core) / INDG (option) / LIBS (specialisation) / LLCU  (option) / Con-Ed Teaching Subject (First Nations, Métis and Inuit Studies; Geography; History.
Course Instructor: Dr Barbara Holler - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
This course is available in:   Fall and Winter terms (Full year course.)
Course Prerequisites / Exclusions:   None

DEVS100 was a great introduction to theoretical and practical concepts in Global Development Studies. We analyzed case studies in class and discussed global issues. I now feel confident to explore the subject further and fully prepared to debate the problems associated with global inequality.

 SHIVANI, FIRST YEAR STUDENT 

Course Highlights:

Discussions of the basic theoretical concepts of development studies, a history of global inequality and short histories of alternative development strategies.

Case studies of Canada’s ties to the so-called third world will include missionaries, military, business, and aid. Canadian colonialism over First Nations peoples will also introduce basic issues in Aboriginal Studies.

"DEVS 100 really explores what it means to be Canadian, British and even Human. By the end of this course, students will have a better understanding of context and become smarter, more efficient consumers of information." - Barbara Holler

2020 11

DEVS 100/6.0 Canada and the "Third World"

Introduces basic theoretical concepts of development studies, the history of global inequality, the role of local and transnational actors and institutions such as the World Bank, key debates in development policy, and short histories of alternative development strategies. Case studies of Canada's ties to the so-called "third world" will include missionaries, military, business, and aid. Canadian colonialism over First Nations peoples will introduce basic issues in Aboriginal Studies.

The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the theoretical perspectives and main issues that have informed current thinking in Global Development Studies. This includes discussions of the basic theoretical concepts of development studies, a history of global inequality and short histories of alternative development strategies. This course will explore these issues in the context of specific case studies highlighting the relationship between developing countries and Canada. These case studies cover a wide range of topics such as economics, paid work and global labour markets, education, gender, First Nations peoples, Canadian Aid policies, Foreign Policy and International Development. Each week, different theoretical perspectives are illustrated and discussed through reference to concrete empirical applications. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of conceptual issues of development studies as well as with a more practical and policy oriented understanding of development planning and implementation.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course a successful student will be able to:

  • Distinguish between various theories of development
  • Have a clear grasp of the contested meaning of development
  • Understand the implications for policy, academic work and social activism that different theories of development imply
  • Explore the power relations-local, national and global-that shape the creation and further the propagation of different theories of development
  • Produce critical analysis within a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approach.
  • Summarize texts and debates and present them in written form
  • Understand how to structure an argument
  • Be able to present data and case studies in a variety of formats such as electronic posters, reports, maps, etc

Experiential Learning Opportunities

Examples of previous ELOs include Earthship Brighton, the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool and a visit to the offices of The International Aids Alliance, Brighton.

Bader International Study Centre
Herstmonceux Castle
Hailsham, East Sussex
United Kingdom, BN27 1RN
Phone: +44 1323 834444
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Undergraduate Admission and Recruitment
Gordon Hall, 74 Union Street
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario
Canada, K7L 3N6
Phone: (613) 533-2218
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