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Queen's University

 
 

Instructor: Dr Ben Martin

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Our relationship to the culture and state that we live within significantly impacts upon our lives, as does the relationship we have towards others and even ourselves. Consequently, it’s important that we have an opportunity to reflect upon these relationships and ask whether our current attitude towards our social, cultural, and personal identity is justified.

Available in Winter 2018, Summer 2018 and Winter 2019.

PREREQUISITE    Level 2 or above.

Our relationship to the culture and state that we live within significantly impacts upon our lives, as does the relationship we have towards others and even ourselves. Consequently, it’s important that we have an opportunity to reflect upon these relationships and ask whether our current attitude towards our social, cultural, and personal identity is justified. The course will be split into four sections: Our relationship to ourselves, our relationship to the state, our relationship to others, and our relationship to culture. Each week we will consider a new topic ranging from the importance of culture to nationalism, from discrimination to citizenship, and from world poverty to philosophical accounts of the self.

 

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course learners will be able to:
• Evaluate arguments for both what obligations we have to ourselves and to others.
• Explain arguments for the importance of culture.
• Consider whether we have good reason to be moral relativists or moral objectivists.
• Provide an account of what obligations the state has to us, and what obligations we have to the state.
• Discuss what it is to have a continuous identity throughout our lives.

 

Experiential learning opportunities

This course will involve two experiential learning opportunities:

1) A visit to the Museum of Immigration and Diversity (London)
In this trip we will learn about the impact that immigration has had upon major cities, and particularly London, across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This trip will provide us with an opportunity to discuss the relationship between tolerance and citizenship in liberal Western societies, and what responsibility the state has towards political and economic migrants.

2) Guest Lecture
In this experiential learning exercise we will be visited by a guest lecturer who will speak on a topic related to the subject of the course.
Dates on both TBA.

 

Assessment

Participation -10%
Essay One - 35%
Field Study exercise - 10%
Exam - 45%

 

Bader International Study Centre
Herstmonceux Castle
Hailsham, East Sussex
United Kingdom, BN27 1RN
Phone: +44 1323 834444
Fax: +44 1323 834499
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Undergraduate Admission and Recruitment
Gordon Hall, 74 Union Street
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario
Canada, K7L 3N6
Phone: (613) 533-2218
Fax: (613) 533-6810
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