Department of Classics

DEPARTMENT OF

Classics

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2019-2020 Courses:  300-level


Classical Studies  (CLST)

CLST 303/3.0 units - Archaeology of Early Greece  (Fall)
An intensive survey of the material culture of the ancient Greek world using archaeological evidence from the Bronze Age with the Minoan and Mycenaean cultures to the end of the Archaic period. The course will focus on architecture, sculpture, as well as metal and ceramic artifacts in order to understand their meaning and function in the society that produced them during the period examined. Students will familiarize with different methodological approaches and theoretical models.
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Cristiana Zaccagnino
TEXTBOOK:  J.M. Barringer, The Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece, Cambridge University Press 2015
LEARNING HOURS    126 (36L;90P)
PREREQUISITE    (CLST 102/3.0 and CLST 103/3.0) or CLST 129/6.0 or CLST130/3.0 or CLST 131/3.0 or CLST 200/3.0 or CLST  207/3.0 or CLST 101/6.0 or permission of the Department. 

CLST 309/3.0 units - Caravan Cities of the Ancient Near East  (Winter)
Caravan cities were multicultural communities that bridged ancient empires and are an important part of the world's heritage. Through an exploration of the archaeological remains and the cultural character of four Near Eastern caravan cities students will evaluate how these communities inform and impact on concepts of cultural and global identity.
NOTE:  This course can also be taken as a Sub for degrees in Art History, Global Development, and Language, Literatures, and Cultures, and World Language Studies

INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Barbara Reeves
TEXTBOOK(S):  READINGS available via course onQ
LEARNING HOURS    120 (18L;12S;84P)
PREREQUISITE    Level 3 and (CLST 102/3.0 or CLST 103/3.0 or CLST 129/6.0 or CLST 130/3.0 or CLST 131/3.0 or CLST 200/3.0  or CLST 201/3.0) or permission of the department. 

CLST 314/3.0 units - Doctor, Bloodletter, Surgeon: The Beginnings of Western Medicine  (Winter)
A study of how the human body is viewed in ancient medical theory and practice. Readings of ancient medical texts will explore how the human body is constituted, how it relates to the world, what the role of the physician was seen to be in prevention and treatment of disease, and how illness and healing were understood in ancient Greece and Rome.
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Daryn Lehoux
TEXTBOOK:  TBA
LEARNING HOURS    126 (36L;90P)
PREREQUISITE    CLST 200/3.0 or CLST 201/3.0 or CLST 207/3.0 or CLST 208/3.0 or CLST 214/3.0.

CLST 333/3.0 units - The Rise of the Athenian Empire to the End of the Peloponnesian War  (Fall)
Study of the rise of Athenian power from the end of the Persian Wars in 479 BCE, and the conflict between Athens and Sparta along with their allies during the Peloponnesian War (431-404 BCE). Topics may include the Delian League and Athenian imperialism, development of radical democracy in Athens, and causes and effects of the Peloponnesian War.
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Tim Wright
TEXTBOOK:  TBA
LEARNING HOURS    126 (36L;90P)
PREREQUISITE    CLST 200/3.0 or permission of the Department.
EXCLUSION(S)   CLST 330/3.0 

CLST 341/3.0 units - The Roman Empire  (Fall)
Intensive study of the Empire to the reign of Marcus Aurelius. Politics of the imperial courts: administration and  Romanization of the provinces.
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Bernard Kavanagh
TEXTBOOK:  TBA
LEARNING HOURS    126 (36L;90P)
PREREQUISITE    CLST 201/3.0 or permission of the Department.

CLST 343/3.0 units - The Later Roman Empire  (Winter)
Intensive study of the Later Roman Empire from the reign of Septimius Severus to the death of Theodosius I (395 CE). Topics include the Severan dynasty, the crisis of the the Third Century, the Tetrarchy, and the Christianization of the Roman empire. 
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Beatrice Poletti
TEXTBOOK:  TBA
LEARNING HOURS    126 (36L;90P)
PREREQUISITE    CLST 201/3.0 or permission of the Department. 


Ancient Languages

GREK 321/3.0 units - Greek Prose:  Rhetoric  (Fall)
Selected passages of Greek prose, usually drawn from oratory, history, and philosophy, read in the original Greek and  commented upon for their linguistic, literary, and historical significance.
NOTE:   This course is normally co‐taught with GREK 421/3.0.
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Tim Wright
TEXTBOOK:  TBA
LEARNING HOURS    126 (36L;90P)
PREREQUISITE    A grade of C in GREK 208/6.0 or permission of the Department of Classics.

GREK 322/3.0 units - Greek Verse:  Epic  (Winter)
Selected passages of Greek verse, usually drawn from works of epic, lyric, elegy, and drama, read in the original Greek and  commented upon for their linguistic, literary, and historical significance.
NOTE:   This course is normally co‐taught with GREK 422/3.0.
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Sveva Savelli
TEXTBOOK:  TBA
LEARNING HOURS    126 (36L;90P)
PREREQUISITE    A grade of C in GREK 208/6.0 or permission of the Department of Classics. 

LATN 321/3.0 units - Latin Prose:  Roman Historians  (Fall)
Selected passages of Latin prose, usually drawn from oratory, history, and philosophy, read in the original Latin and  commented upon for their linguistic, literary, and historical significance.
Fall 2019:  Cicero and Roman Sicily: The case against Gaius Verres
Marcus Tullius Cicero (107-44BCE) was the greatest Latin orator of Ancient Rome. For over two thousand years his orations have been admired, studied, and imitated as superb examples of Latin prose style and eloquent expression. This course will focus on Cicero’s Verrine Orations and Roman Sicily. Gaius Verres (c. 120–43 BC) was the corrupt governor of the Roman province of Sicilia from74-70BCE. His abuse of power is legendary and included extensive bribery, robbery, plundering of art work, and even crucifying a Roman citizen. The Sicilians begged Cicero to help them prosecute Verres. Cicero travelled to Syracuse, compiled witnesses, and did extensive research for his prosecution. He composed seven orations against Verres, but only delivered two -- they were so devastating that Verres fled and was condemned in absentia. Cicero published and distributed all seven orations to further his career. They were immediately considered masterpieces of Latin oratory and models for legal prosecution.  The class will consist of reading selections from Cicero’s Verrine Orations (a PDF of readings will be supplied).  
NOTE:   This course is normally co‐taught with LATN 421/3.0.
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Anthony D'Elia
LEARNING HOURS    126 (36L;90P)
PREREQUISITE    A grade of C in LATN 209/6.0 or permission of the Department of Classics. 

LATN 322/3.0 units - Latin Verse:  Epic  (Winter)
Selected passages of Latin verse, usually drawn from epic, lyric, elegy, and drama, read in the original Latin and commented  upon for their linguistic, literary, and historical significance.
NOTE:    This course is normally co‐taught with LATN 422/3.0.
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Bernard Kavanagh
TEXTBOOK:  TBA
LEARNING HOURS    126 (36L;90P)
PREREQUISITE    A grade of C in LATN 209/6.0 or permission of the Department of Classics.


Please also see Classics course offerings through Queen's Arts & Science Continuing and Distance Studies.

For a full listing of all courses offered by the Department of Classics please go to the Courses of Instruction section of the Arts and Science ECalendar.