Cultural Studies

Cultural Studies

Interdisciplinary Graduate Program

Cultural Studies

Interdisciplinary Graduate Program

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Elective Courses

In addition to your core course requirements, Cultural Studies students will complete up to 4 elective courses (depending on program of study). Electives may be selected from courses offered by Cultural Studies and/or from courses offered by other departments.  Cultural Studies students who would like to take graduate courses in other departments will require permission from the instructor.

Please note that graduate courses are often timetabled in June and this page will be updated as information becomes available to us.  Class times and locations will also be made available by the department where the courses is offered - please be sure to check the graduate section of their website.

How do I register in a non-CUST elective?

Step 1.  Identify the instructor for any non-CUST elective course that is of interest to you.  Students seeking electives should review the list below and explore other opportunities by reviewing the graduate websites for any departments of interest (i.e., the list below is not always comprehensive). Often, professors will be willing to take a CS student into their course if there is room, and if the student has the appropriate background.

Step 2.  Write to the instructor, by email, with a description of your goals and background, and ask if they will accept you into their course. Please note that the answer may not be certain yet, and may depend on enrollment numbers, but establishing the relationship is the first step.

Step 3.  Once you have approval, you will need to print and complete an Academic Change Form.  Once completed, you will need to sign the form yourself and arrange for it to be signed by (1) the course instructor and (2) your supervisor.  Bring the completed, signed form to the Cultural Studies Office in B126B.  This can often be done by fax or email.

Explore 2020-2021 Electives, by Department

Art History

You may also wish to check the Department of Art History Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

ARTH 422/868:  Topics in Later 20th Century Art: Contemporary Art and Digital Culture.  Fall 2020.
Instructor:  Jen Kennedy

Well before the outbreak of COVID-19 in early 2020, artists, art historians, and arts institutions increasingly relied on digital technologies––from familiar social media apps to custom-designed tools and platforms––to produce new works, engage audiences, augment learning in exhibitions, and increase accessibility, among numerous other outcomes.  Since early April, however, experiments with, and debates about, these technologies have both spread and intensified as they have been used to replace experiences (visiting the museum, for example) that they were often intended to enhance. This course examines the profound effects of digital culture on contemporary art and contextualizes them within a longer history of experimentation going back to the mid-20th century. We will examine analog precursors (mail art, fluxus, early telecommunications art, video art, zines), the digital revolution (net art, social media, post-internet art, digital curatorial tools, AI, VR, and digital humanities), and emerging debates about art and digital culture in times of social distancing.
Please contact Jen Kennedy for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

Classics

You may also wish to check the Department of Classics Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

CLAS 815: Archaeology of the Roman Army.  Fall 2020.
Instructor:  Dr. Barbara Reeves
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.

The goal of this course is to familiarize graduate students with the wide range of materials available for studying the Roman army. The Roman army constitutes one of the most documented groups from the ancient world. Forts, inscriptions, and military paraphernalia have been found in all parts of the former Roman Empire. A rich collection of ancient literary texts relating to Roman military practices has also survived. By studying this material, students will learn not just about the Roman army, but about the range of materials available for studying the ancient world in general. 
Please contact Dr. Barbara Reeves for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

Dan School of Drama and Music

You may also wish to check the Dan School of Drama and Music Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

MUTH 329: Listening Otherwise.  Winter 2021. (this course can be taken as a CUST directed reading course)
Instructor:  Dylan Robinson

We listen every day and every moment, yet often do not often consider the ways in which this form of perception is guided by factors including gender, cultural background, sexuality, race, class, and ability (i.e. our individual positionality). Listening Otherwise considers the particular ways in which listening takes place in different settings (the concert hall, gallery, and urban and domestic spaces), and is influenced not only by cultural and gendered norms, but also by values of the institutions we are part of and the nation states we live within. The course is envisioned as a kind of “listening lab” in which we will experiment with different practices of listening. Students will have the opportunity to explore new ways of listening to music (recorded and live performance), of listening to place (as a ‘visitor/guest’ or when ‘at home’), and reconsider the political stakes of listening.
Please contact Dylan Robinson for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

 

Faculty of Education

You may also wish to check the Faculty of Education Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

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English

You may also wish to check the Department of English Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

ENGL 816 Topics in Literary Study II: Talking on the Page: Oral History as Art and Testimony.  Fall 2020. 
Instructor: Laura Murray
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.
Oral history is both an art and a research methodology. In recording and representing the spoken expression of real people, it translates from one medium to another, and one context to many other contexts. Ethically, it is extremely complex. Oral historians often seek to amplify marginalized voices. But what power dynamic or even violence is at play in what was sometimes called the “capturing” of “live” speech? Artistically, too, oral history offers many challenges. But while transcription and editing are often associated with loss of authenticity, the choices required also allow for enriching transformation. This course is a hybrid of practical and critical work and may be of interest to students in History and Cultural Studies as well as English. Assigned readings will include excerpts and entire works of oral history (TBA, but e.g. Alexievich, Voices from Chernobyl; Hurston, Barracoon; Minde/Ahenakew/Wolfart, Their Example Showed me the Way, etc.), and critical articles on orality, method, and historiography. The course will also offer training in some basics of oral history interviewing. In addition to participating in class discussion, each student will undertake an interview project including transcription and/or editing and/or transformation, and write a paper; the relative scale and weighting of the two assignments will depend on each student’s goals for the course.
Please contact Laura Murray for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

ENGL 877: Creole Dreams, Syncretic Visions.  Fall 2020.
Instructor: Asha Varadharajan
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.

This course will serve as a snappy and provocative introduction to anglophone African and Caribbean cultural expression. Where appropriate, and for purposes of comparison, we will discuss African-American and diasporic Afro-Caribbean cultural production. We will read poetry, fiction, plays, essays; sample lyrics and music; appreciate cinema, art and photography; encounter new media and other forms of the virtual ; and revel in comedy and performance. The works we will explore contend with ecology and economy; language, culture and society; body, sexuality, psyche, and spirit. While colonialism has no doubt left violence and suffering in its wake, our "authors" exude joy, cheek, danger, and sex appeal. Tropes/concepts such as negritude, creolization, syncretism, apartheid, animism, the postcolony, and so on will merit sustained scrutiny and redefinition. Every effort will be made to introduce both canonical and emergent cultural producers in a range of genres and modes. Multi-media and crossdisciplinary approaches to assignments will be encouraged. The proposed remote, asynchronous teaching in the Fall will result in a range of inventive forms of assigned participation, group discussion forums, and short, focused writing tasks designed to trace a discernible learning curve and promote an exponential ease and familiarity with postcolonial thought, anti-colonial resistance, and tactics of decolonization.
Please contact Asha Varadharajan for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

ENGL 872: The Environment in Contemporary Canadian and Indigenous Literatures.  Fall 2020.
Instructor: Petra Fachinger
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.

This seminar will be concerned with contemporary Canadian and Indigenous texts that take environmental issues as their major topic. It intends to acknowledge the historical, cultural, and social specificities that affect environmental writing in this country within the global context. We will consider a variety of modes and genres, including the novel, Indigenous ways of storytelling, creative nonfiction, ecopoetry, and ecodrama to explore questions of environmental poetics and social justice. Our discussion will be informed by various ecocritical approaches including ecofeminism, ecocriticism and urban environments, environmental justice, and the intersection between environmental humanities and Indigenous studies.
Please contact Petra Fachinger for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

ENGL 815:  Topics in Literary Study I:  Performing Blackness: Black Drama and Performance Theory.  Winter 2021.
Instructor: Kristin Moriah
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.

Zora Neale Hurston’s play Color Struck (1926), opens with a journey to a cakewalk competition in St. Augustine, Florida. Caught up in a debate around colourism, the main character John insists that “dancing is dancing no matter who is doing it.” But as John and his companions learn, for Black performers, the issues raised by dance and performance are almost always closely tied to race. To whit, Daphne Brooks reminds us that “in the context of an evolving African American literary tradition questing for existential meaning and an avenue to state with conviction that ‘I was born,’ a diverse array of political activists, stage performers, and writers utilized their work to interrogate the ironies of black identity formation.” In this course, we will closely examine the work of activists, stage performers, and writers who do just that. This course will provide students with an opportunity to study foundational works of Black performance theory like Daphne Brooks’ Bodies in Dissent and E. Patrick Johnson's Appropriating Blackness: Performance and the Politics of Authenticity alongside Black performance art, drama, and television.
Please contact Kristin Moriah for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

Film and Media/Screen Cultures and Curatorial Studies

You may also wish to check the Department of Film and Media Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

SCCS 820: Media Production Seminar.  Fall 2020.
Instructor: Emily Pelstring
Mondays 2:30-5:30, in person, Isabel 222
This course is designed for students with active creative practices.  The course will facilitate structured peer feedback opportunities for students as they complete a self-directed project in the medium of their choice. Each student will be expected to take a single project from concept to completion during the semester.  The project should be new at the start of the course, and should build on the student’s existing body of work.  While students will be self-directed in the technical production of their projects, they will be accountable to the class for an introduction to their creative practice and background, a clear presentation of their production plan, well-prepared in-progress updates, a polished final presentation, and high-quality final documentation.  Traditional studio-critique models will be consciously interrogated; students will be asked to reflect on the purpose and benefits of critique, and strive to develop a common language in order to communicate as creative peers with diverse practices and approaches.
Restrictions/exclusions: There are no official pre-requisites for this class at this time. However, it is recommended that students have one of the following: a portfolio of creative work; a CV with evidence of creative practice; a transcript with at least one course in any area of creative practice (writing, filmmaking, studio art, drama, music, digital media, dance, etc). If none of those are available, students who wish to take this course are advised to attend an extra-curricular workshop in media production basics before taking the class. 
Please contact Emily Pelstring for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

SCCS 828: Critical Curatorial Studies Seminar.  Fall 2020.
Instructor: Alicia Boutilier
Tuesdays 11:30-2:30 (remote)

This graduate seminar course addresses the histories, theories and issues of curatorial practice as a tool of cultural agency and considers evolving paradigms of “the curatorial.” Through critical analysis and engagement with readings and defined case studies, the class will investigate the forces and frameworks that shape the creation and presentation of exhibitions, programs and screenings, ranging across such topics as display formats, material and digital forms of narrative building, local and global circuits of reception, audience-making, resources/markets, festivals, institutional types and collections. Addressing both conceptual frameworks and the political economy of curatorial practice, students will consider the roles of belief systems/values, policy, politics, funding agencies and philanthropists as these impact cultural expression and exchange. The meaning and usage of the word “curate” has evolved dramatically in recent years, both inside and outside the art world. This course explores the following core questions. What is the role of a curator? How do we best understand curatorial methodologies for the display of objects, experiences and information, and fully exercise their potential in different contexts? And, how do curators negotiate the aesthetic, social, political, physical and economic factors that shape and communicate creative cultural content?  The aim of the seminar is to provide an in-depth understanding of curating today from a range of diverse perspectives. In examining curatorial practices and the material and virtual spaces they activate, students will develop critical visual literacy, as well as the advanced writing, analytical and presentation skills necessary for participation in current discourses and public-facing animation of artistic production.
Please contact Alicia Boutilier for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

SCCS 830:  Curating in Context.  Winter 2021.
Instructor: Sunny Kerr
Tuesdays 11:30-2:30.  Agnes Etherington Art Centre Room 256.

This production-oriented graduate course explores the development of exhibitions, programs, screenings and collections, with emphasis on drawing out and cultivating their relationship to context. Students will develop advanced understanding of curatorial methods, applied standards and innovative experimentation through projects fusing autonomous creative research, articulation and collaboration. The course offers a modular framework to support and enable students to encounter and experience practical strategies for the successful realization of artistic programs in visual and media arts, an approach applicable to both contemporary and historical works. Taking advantage of the context of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre’s specialist staff, collections, facilities and artistic networks, students will undertake a guided team-driven project to explore and experience curatorial practice through developing an exhibition, screening, festival program or public-facing extra-mural or online artistic project. The course objective is to provide hands-on experience within an institutional context, while engaging in critical issues of curatorial practice under the instruction of a professional curator. This course considers the ways in which curators develop, manage and engage with artists, audiences, collections, pragmatic mobilization of resources, aesthetic integrity and expressive potentials, while responding to diverse institutional and non-institutional contexts and histories, as well as geo-political and social conditions. What are the drivers that inform and shape the work of curators today? Through what strategies of curatorial practice can the context of presentation be mobilized?
Please contact Sunny Kerr for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

Gender Studies

You may also wish to check the Department of Gender Studies Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

A list of 2020-21 course offerings is available on our department website: https://www.queensu.ca/gnds/graduate/courses

GNDS 802:  Methodologies in Gender Studies.  Fall 2020.
Instructor: Scott Morgensen

This interdisciplinary seminar examines methodologies in gender studies and in such fields as critical race, feminist, women’s, queer or trans studies. Course materials connect multiple academic disciplines and local-global perspectives. Students examine anti-oppressive politics of knowledge production and the uses of knowledge in processes of social change. Required of GNDS graduate students.  Background study in feminist, gender, sexuality, and/or queer studies and/or concentration of the graduate research project in these areas.
Please contact Scott Morgensen for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

Geography and Planning

You may also wish to check the Department of Geography and Planning Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

GPHY 836: Critical Modes of Inquiry / Politics of Knowledge Production.  Fall 2020.
Instructor: Heather Castleden
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.
Through readings and dialogue, we ponder how qualitative, participatory, and Indigenous methods of critical inquiry open up possibilities for research by confronting the socio-politico-historical power relations of knowledge production, studying the how and why of every-day lived experiences and the structures that shape/are shaped by them. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged, through critical inquiry and reflexive practice, to question whose knowledge is recognized (or excluded), and under what conditions is knowledge produced, legitimized, communicated, and acted upon.
Restrictions/exclusions: While there is no prerequisite, I assume that graduate students taking this course will already have had an introduction to qualitative research methods during their undergraduate training or applied professional experience and have some degree of theoretical social science literacy in this line of inquiry. If they have not, then I recommend that they read the following text in advance of taking this course to become familiar with the ‘how to’ of conducting qualitative inquiry, so that we may focus more on participatory, critical, and Indigenous modes or methods of inquiry: Hay, Iain. (Ed). (2016). Qualitative Research Methods in Human Geography (4th Ed). Oxford University Press.
Please contact Heather Castleden for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

GPHY 870:  Historical and Cultural Issues in Fieldwork.  Spring 2021.
Instructor: Laura Jean Cameron

This course actively explores the histories, practises and cultural meanings of fieldwork. Geographical fieldwork is considered along with conceptions of the 'field' in allied disciplines such as ecology and anthropology. Constructions of the 'field' are addressed in terms of empire, nationalism, 'nature', pedagogy, translocalism, the lab-field border, performativity and in relation to its role as a gendered, ethical, racialized, imaginative, biopoliticized, sensory and affective space of knowledge and activity.
Fieldwork has long had a key role in the making of knowledge in both social and natural sciences. Recent work in geography, sociology and the history of science has begun to explore diverse cultures of the field, raising a range of questions about the nature of field knowledge. Where is the field and for whom? The course focuses on case studies and currents pertinent to the study of field cultures within North America and elsewhere. The primary objective is to provide opportunities for in-depth discussion and activities to help understand and reassess the motives, practises and status of fieldwork. 
Weekly seminars will involve excursions, discussion of the course readings, films, field exercises as well as presentations integrating course themes and reflections upon the students' past and future fieldwork activities. The readings, including relevant journal articles and book chapters, will be made available.
Please contact Laura Jean Cameron for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

Global Development Studies

You may also wish to check the Department of Global Development Studies Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

DEVS 492/872:  Indigenous Theory.  Fall 2020.
Instructor:  Bob Lovelace

In recent years the term indigenous has become popular in describing Aboriginal people in Canada. This course goes beyond the euphemistic and often politically expedient use of the term to explore the meaning of Indigeneity, the emerging scholarship in Indigenous Theory, and current processes of indigenization.  Students will explore legal and cultural applications of indigenous identity through a variety of contemporary readings and classroom discussions.  Areas of interest will be economics, law, social/cultural development, colonization/de-colonization, and predictive futures. While this course will explore Aboriginal identity in Canada as part of the study, the focus is much broader; examining global indigenous realities as well as an expanding theoretical foundation.

Becoming human, as Edward O.Wilson explains, has been a convergent process of Genetics, Culture and Environment. "No organ in the history of life has grown faster. When true men diverged from ancestral man-apes the brain added one cubic inch - about a teaspoonful - every hundred thousand years.  The rate was maintained until about one quarter of a million years ago, when about the time of the appearance of the modern Homo sapiens, it tapered off. Physical growth was then supplanted by an increasingly prominent cultural evolution." Wilson goes on to identify our most obvious liability. “The real problem of humanity is the following: we have paleolithic emotions; medieval institutions; and god-like technology. And it is terrifically dangerous, and it is now approaching a point of crisis overall.”

Indigenous Theory as a focus of study attempts to understand how Biology, Culture and Ecology intersect as co-evolutionary forces as a matrix in which Humans and Human Societies exist.  Using indigenous perspectives allows the student to conceptualize how Biology (genetic definitions), Culture (what we teach and learn) and Environment/Ecology (the matrix of all objects and processes in which the other 2 variables exist) change and interact at different rates of development.  The flow of intersections can be seen to exist in what Anthropologists once called the "primitive state", in transitions created through colonialism and other forms of Imperialism, and within the cultural multiplicities of what we call modernism.  This course only scratches the surface of Indigenous Theory.  I hope that it opens the window enough to create a greater curiosity and build in the student the capacity to take it beyond the limits of the academy.
Please contact Bob Lovelace for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

 

DEVS 870:  The ‘African Renaissance’ in Crisis; Capitalism, Climate, and COVID-19.  Fall 2020.
Instructor:  Marc Epprecht

The ‘African renaissance’ is an optimistic vision for sustainable development that marries cultural revival, new technologies and trading partners, and democratization with dynamic forms of local capitalism. Many impressive achievements were made throughout Africa through the 2000s. The Great Recession and growing scientific evidence of climate crisis, however, have since engendered deep reservations about the productivist and anthropocentric assumptions of economic growth. The COVID-19 pandemic has since shattered the model almost completely. This course will evaluate the impacts and implications of the overlapping crises of capitalism, climate and public health upon core tenets of the African renaissance vision. It begins with a critical overview of the history of underdevelopment under colonial and neo-colonial conditions, including through unequal relations in the production of knowledge about Africa. Students then examine a specific proposed development (or crisis mitigation initiative), critically assessing the debates around it leading to mature reflection on “what next”? Topics include: aid versus trade, colonial borders/languages vs. indigenous cultures/languages, tourism, health, human rights, refugees/migration, social media, basic income guarantees, and much more. The major research essay will involve a case study of urban redevelopment in light of these global challenges.  A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for DEVS MA graduate students who may not take more than two such mixed courses.
Please contact Marc Epprecht for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

 

DEVS 813:  Global Environmental Politics.  Winter 2021.
Instructor:  Kyla Tienhaara

This seminar examines the political challenges of addressing the global environmental crisis. The first half of the course will focus on key moments in the history of global environmental governance from the Stockholm Conference in 1972 to the signing of the Paris Agreement in 2015. Students will explore how various actors (e.g. states, international organizations, scientists, corporations, activists) have shaped the outcomes in these moments for better or worse. The extent to which the “North-South” divide has hindered progress in global environmental governance will also be addressed. In the second half of the course, students will assess efforts to “green” global economic institutions, with particular attention given to the World Bank and the World Trade Organization.
Please contact Kyla Tienhaara for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

 

History

You may also wish to check the Department of History Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

HIST 831: Empires and Intimacies.  Fall Term.
Instructor: Karen Dubinsky
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.
This course explores familial and intimate relations of power created in and by empires from the late nineteenth century to the present. The readings are thematic and interdisciplinary, drawn from transnational contexts, primarily in the Americas. Topics include colonial knowledge formation, child welfare and adoption, militarism, tourism, visual cultures, decolonization and sexual politics.
Please contact Karen Dubinsky for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

HIST 400:  Post-colonial Theory and French Canada.  Fall 2020.
Instructor: Caroline-Isabelle Caron
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.
This seminar will introduce students to post-colonial theories through the examination of case studies from Quebec. We will explore the issues of colonialism, hegemony, decolonization and post-colonialism by examining how they can help understand certain aspects of Quebec's history. We will also see how Quebec thinkers sometimes used these theories to support their ideas, either rightly or wrongly. In doing so, we will touch upon the themes of the colonial state, identities, the family, gender, the Catholic Church, nationalism and ethnicities in the 19th and 20th centuries. Weekly discussions will be based on mandatory readings.
Please contact Caroline-Isabelle Caron for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

HIST 887: Topics in Mediterranean History.  Winter Term.
Instructor: Ariel Salzmann
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.

This course explores the history of the Mediterranean basin (from Iberia to Anatolia; and from Algiers to Sarajevo) from the perspective of the Ottoman Empire, a Muslim state that decisively shaped the region's politics, society, culture and economy from the Renaissance to the end of World War I. Beginning with a discussion of Edward Said's Orientalism (1978) and a consideration of Said's theoretical influence on recent scholarship on the Balkans, North Africa and the Middle East, as well as on post-colonial historiography more generally, the course adopts a transcultural and transnational approach to the region's nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Minority-majority relations, migration, geopolitics and war, political theory and practice, patterns of foreign intervention, aspects of legal and institutional change, as well as late/post-imperial identities will be among the topics explored over the term. 
Please contact Ariel Salzmann for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

HIST 416:  Canadian Material History.  Winter 2021.
Instructor: Caroline-Isabelle Caron
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.
This senior seminar will introduce students to the basics of material history methodology while exploring the many meanings of the «stuff life is made of», i.e. the artifacts among which Canadians have lived since about 1900, those things that have shaped Canadian identities and cultures to this day. This course will look at how artifacts can inform and enrich historical inquiry. Because historians have traditionally and primarily relied on texts, they have often overlooked artifacts, therefore ignoring the methodological frameworks found in archaeology, anthropology, art history, folklore, etc., where objects are at the centre of analysis. Consequently, they have missed out on large portions of the lived experience in the past.
Please contact Caroline-Isabelle Caron for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

HIST 809: Imperial History and Postcolonial Theory.  Spring 2021.
Instructor:  Ishita Pande

Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.
This course introduces students to the key ideas and methods associated with postcolonial theory, and how it has reshaped our understanding of colonial, imperial, and global histories. Featuring scholarship on the British (and occasionally the French, Dutch and American) empires, the course puts history in dialogue with theory, encourages interdisciplinary thinking, and challenges conventional notions of temporality, causality, power, knowledge, and even the “archive” itself. Themes such as nationalism, race, capitalism, science, liberalism, law, human rights, climate, gender/sexuality are explored via the history of colonialism. 
Please contact Ishita Pande for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

HIST 812 / 471: Power and Knowledge – Foucault for Historians. Winter 2021
Instructor: Steven Maynard
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.

In this seminar, a combined graduate and fourth-year undergraduate course, we will explore how Foucault revolutionized the study of history, including the fields of madness and medicine, prison and punishment, sexuality and the self. In addition to reading Foucault, we will also look at how historians have made use of Foucault’s ‘toolkit’ – concepts such as biopolitics and governmentality – in their own research and writing. Our aim will be to examine how historians have adapted, elaborated, and critiqued Foucault, notably in the areas of gender, race, and colonialism.
Please contact Steven Maynard for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

School of Environmental Studies

You may also wish to check the School of Environmental Studies and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

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School of Kinesiology and Health Studies

You may also wish to check the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

KHS 869: Bodies and Social Theory.  Fall 2020.
Instructor: Samantha King
Tuesdays 1:30pm-4:30pm

This course explores key theoretical approaches to the meaning, mood, and matter of bodies in the contemporary world. Through a range of topics including food, cancer, toxins, reproduction, biometrics, and pain, we will attend to both the vitality and multiplicity of bodies and their subjection within enduring structures of power. Our objectives are as follows: 1) to consider how bodies are most effectively historicized and conceptualized; 2) to learn key concepts in body studies (e.g., embodiment, corporeality, affect, difference, discipline, biopolitics, posthumanism); 3) to explore prominent intellectual debates within the field; 4) to consider how research on bodies might contribute to the development of theory; and 5) to practice advanced skills in reading, writing, and speaking about bodies and social theory.
Please contact Samantha King for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

Law

You may also wish to check the Faculty of Law Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

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Philosophy

You may also wish to check the Department of Philosophy and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

PHIL 812: Worlding Possible Worlds: Futurity, VR, and Anishinaabe Ontology; Winter 2021.
Instructor: Dolleen Manning
Wednesday 2:30pm-5:30pm

This course engages graduate students in the philosophy, politics and aesthetics of worldmaking, running in its entirety in virtual world platform (i.e. Second Life). We take an interdisciplinary approach toward constructing/theorizing new and radically different possible worlds with socially transformative politics. Drawing on decolonial thought, Indigenous knowledge, Anishinaabe ontology (cosmology), Sci-fi, XR arts (such as virtual reality), and continental philosophy. Responding to current global crises, as well as a pervading fatigue and sense of disillusionment with liberal narratives of progress and the failed projects of 20th century utopianism, students will work collaboratively to design imaginary alternative worlds and engage in immersive storytelling that is responsive to course readings and contemporary issues in such spheres as settler colonialism, Indigenous resurgence, mnidoo-worlding, other-than-human interrelationality, Indigenous and black futurity, as well as critical race, disability justice, and queer critiques. There will be opportunities for cross-dialogue and co-learning with Cinema and Media Arts graduate students in a related course held at York University, who will be sharing our virtual space. The course involves lectures, seminar discussions, presentations, and research or research creation.
Please contact the cs.office@queensu.ca for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

Political Studies

You may also wish to check the Department of Political Studies and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

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Psychology

You may also wish to check the Department of Psychology Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

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School of Religion

You may also wish to check the School of Religion Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

RELS 452: Contemporary Religious Situation.  Fall 2020.
Instructor:  Amarnath Amarasingam

Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.

This course will provide students with a broad introduction to the sociology of religion by looking at issues like lived religion, secularization, modernity, public religion, and similar topics. Due to the extraordinary situation brought on by COVID-19, this course will be conducted remotely: all lectures will be recorded and posted on OnQ along with PowerPoint slides. Students are not required to be on campus for any part of the course but are expected to keep up to date with readings, participate in online discussions facilitated through OnQ, and submit written assignments to the professor on time. In person office hours will not be held, but the professor is available over email and, if necessary, Teams/Skype.
Please contact Amarnath Amarasingam for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

RELS 888: Critical Ethnographies in the Study of Religion.  Fall 2020.
Instructor:  Shobhana Xavier

Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.

The seminar explores the strategies and processes of writing about culture and religion through the methodology of ethnography.  This course will be a blend of synchronized (via online platform for discussions) and a-synchronized (lectures and tasks, such as completing ethnographic work and transcribing interviews) but the entire course will be delivered remotely and online.
Please contact Shobhana Xavier for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

 

Sociology

You may also wish to check the Department of Sociology Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

SOCY 936: Disability Studies.  Fall 2020.
Instructor:  Thomas Abrams
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.

Course description to follow.
Please contact Thomas Abrams for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

SOCY 935: Contemporary Surveillance. Fall 2020.
Instructor: David Murakami-Wood

Course description to follow.
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.
Please contact David Murakami-Wood for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

SOCY931:  New Media Cultures.  Winter 2021.
Instructor: Michael Siciliano

Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.

Course description to follow.
Please contact Michael Siciliano for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).

SOCY934: Political Sociology. Winter 2021.
Instructor: Norma Mollers
Date and Time will be confirmed in July; the Department website may have more information.

Course description to follow.
Please contact Norma Mollers for permission to take this course (refer to our “How do I register in a non-CUST elective?” section at the top of this page for additional details).