Cultural Studies

Cultural Studies

Interdisciplinary Graduate Program

Cultural Studies

Interdisciplinary Graduate Program

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Six Queen's faculty affiliated with Cultural Studies have been successful in the recent Queen's Research Opportunities Fund competition. 

Heather Castleden – Dr. Heather Castleden’s pilot study on the impacts associated with dismantling several CIHR initiatives will provide readers with a window into CIHR’s current relationship with Indigenous peoples. Her project, called “CIHR's new open suite of programs and college of reviewers: so, how's that working for pathways to Indigenous health equity in research and outcomes in Canada?” is a study of the 2014 reforms that saw the undoing of 15 years of progress towards respectfully engaging with Indigenous peoples and their values in health research. Her pilot study is designed to interview key players in the reforms, including affiliates of the Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health and other Institute Advisory Board Chairs. Her project will also be analyzing funding success from before and after the structural reforms. Dr. Castleden’s position as a Canada Research Chair in Reconciling Relations for Health, Environments, and Communities and past Vice-Chair on the CIHR-IAPH Advisory Board provide her with insightful background knowledge on these reforms. Her study can provide a valuable history of the health resources available to Indigenous peoples, who have been systemically disadvantaged by the healthcare system, and demonstrate the level of engagement Indigenous peoples have in creating health policies that affect all Canadians.

Marc Epprecht – With his award from the International Fund, Dr. Marc Epprecht will develop Queen’s as a leader in African studies through his proposal for the creation of a “Matariki Network for African Studies.” By cooperating with colleagues at Dartmouth College, specifically Dr. Ayo Coly, Dr. Epprecht will create the necessary framework within the Matariki Network of Universities MNU to promote collaborations with each other and with their African partners. This grant will fund two upcoming colloquia focused on promoting sexual minority rights in Africa through economic development and capacity building. One colloquium will be held at Queen’s on Africa Day 2016 and will involve presentations from faculty in multiple disciplines. The other will occur at Dartmouth College in October 2017 and will concern itself with understanding existing African models for engagement in health and wellness. These colloquia will also assist in preparing for the 2018 Canadian Association of African Studies conference being hosted by Queen’s. Dr. Epprecht anticipates several publications regarding conceptions about African sexual minority rights to come from these conferences, developing Queen’s reputation as a leader in the study of LGBTQI minorities across Africa.

James Miller – Dr. James Miller, through his Decentering Critical Theory, is seeking to reframe the interactions between Chinese and Western cultures. His research focus is the ways in which both cultures perceive the human body in relation to society and nature, which is a topic that will become more important as China rises as a major global power in many fields. Dr. Miller’s project involves several colleagues at five leading institutions across four countries. They have formulated four research questions to be answered individually, one each year for four years, that are aimed at decentering critical theory from its past Western focus. Their papers will be presented at the annual summer institute at Beijing National University. The collaboration will result in several journal publications each year and four edited volumes of their work. Dr. Miller’s project will also allow for greater ties to be built between Queen’s and Beijing National University, and will facilitate bicultural research for students in many disciplines at Queen’s. His project will create new frameworks for interaction and information-sharing across Chinese and Western cultures, and has the potential to be replicated in various other cross-cultural relationships.

Dylan Robinson – The Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Arts, Dr. Dylan Robinson, is bringing renowned Cree/Métis artist Cheryl L’Hirondelle to Queen’s for an artistic residency from September-November 2016. The project, called “Not too few to forget: developing a public art memorial for Kingston’s Prison for Women,” will involve L’Hirondelle in several artistic pursuits during her stay. She will be engaged with the Prison for Women project in fostering conversations with different marginalized groups affected by Kingston’s women’s prison, including a Grandmother’s Council of Indigenous women connected to the prison. These dialogues will work toward the collaborative creation of new artistic work with members of the community connected to Kingston’s Prison for Women. L’Hirondelle will also engage with graduate students and Kingston community members to bring these marginalized histories of incarcerated Indigenous women, men and youth into focus for those without knowledge of this history. L’Hirondelle will visit gender studies and film and media classes and participate in talks to share her experience working with Indigenous women, men and youth in the creation of Freedom Songs, and she will display her media work in the Art and Media Lab at the Isabel Bader Centre. Her time as a visiting artist will greatly enrich the projects of Dr. Robinson as well as the Kingston community at large.

Jane Tolmie – Dr. Jane Tolmie is bringing Queen’s alumna and artist Ciara Phillips to Kingston for a five-week artistic residency. Phillips’ residency aligns well with her exhibition at the Agnes Etherington Arts Centre (AEAC) and the celebration of Queen’s 175th anniversary. Her presence at Queen’s for these events will create a personal connection between herself, her artwork, and her alma mater. Her residency will include her workspace at the AEAC and dedicated open office hours for students, which will show her to be a successful artistic role model for current students. She will host “making together” sessions with community groups to engage the Kingston population with her artwork. Phillips will also be involved at Modern Fuel Artist Run Centre as a discussion group leader and mentor for local artists. She will visit several classes in the Visual Art Program and lead tours of her AEAC exhibition for students in cultural studies, gender studies, political studies, and the BFA program. As a Queen’s graduate and artist concerned with social justice and creative expression, Phillips’ time as a resident artist will positively impact both Queen’s students and Kingston residents with her art exhibition and active community engagement.

Craig Walker – Prominent Toronto playwright and director Kat Sandler will be brought to Queen’s in the fall of 2016 thanks to Dr. Craig Walker. Kat Sandler, who has won numerous awards for her hilarious but morally complex plays, will work with Queen’s Drama students to develop an original work. She will meet with students to assess their talents and begin brainstorming ideas for the play. She will then come to Queen’s in the fall of 2016 as writer and director to do a reading and casting of the play. Starting in January 2017, rehearsals will begin, leading to several performances of the finished piece in the two weeks before Reading Week. Sandler will also conduct several class visits and Q&A Sessions after the performances to connect her with Queen’s students and community members. Sandler’s presence at Queen’s will foster a unique experience for Drama students by having a play written collaboratively with a professional playwright that is tailored to their skill set. Her residency will also show her to be an excellent role model for future Queen’s graduates who are looking to work in the theatre industry.