Department of Global Development Studies

DEPARTMENT OF

Global Development Studies

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DEPARTMENT OF GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
CALL FOR APPLICATIONS:  Teaching Assistant Positions (Fall 2021 and Winter 2022)

The Department of Global Development Studies has Teaching Assistantships available in the following courses for 2021-2022 academic year.  TAships are filled according to Group Preferences set out in the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University and the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC 901 http://psac901.org/). 

Applications are due no later than Thursday August 5, 2021

DEVS 100AB-001:  Canada and the “Third” World (Fall/Winter)
Delivery:  Lecture Remote Asynchronous with in-person tutorials
Introduces basic theoretical concepts of development studies, the history of global inequality, and short histories of alternative development strategies. Case studies of Canada's ties to the so-called third world will include missionaries, military, business, and aid. Canadian colonialism over First Nations peoples will introduce basic issues in Aboriginal Studies.

DEVS 100AB-700:  Canada and the “Third” World (Fall/Winter)
Delivery:  Arts and Science Online (Asynchronous)    
Introduces basic theoretical concepts of development studies, the history of global inequality, and short histories of alternative development strategies. Case studies of Canada's ties to the so-called third world will include missionaries, military, business, and aid. Canadian colonialism over First Nations peoples will introduce basic issues in Aboriginal Studies.

DEVS 210-001: Development in Practice
Delivery:  Lecture and tutorials in person
Development in Practice focuses on institutional efforts to frame, plan, and manage development and change towards sustainable, just and positive outcomes. It will examine political negotiations in setting strategic development agendas and goals. It also includes critically learning about practical planning approaches used in development program.

The history of international development policy and aid is complex, a mixture of hopeful altruism, negotiated agreement, diverse interests, and difficult reality. Development policy and practice is a matter of framing: defining development problems such as persistent poverty, environmental insecurity, and social inequality in much of the developing world often designing different approaches to mitigate and address such problems. Many of these problems over the last 50 years have remained or escalated. Thus, Development Studies is frequently linked, directly or indirectly, to policy – to action – which is the core area of work and responsibility of development practice and often the career trajectory of the development expert. Development in practice is about the workings of development; it is about the ‘doing’ and ‘planning’ of development, which is fraught with political stakes, interests and unexpected outcomes despite contemporary technocratic efforts to predict, manage and govern its conduct. It is the need to roadmap and govern development. Students will have the opportunity to understand a brief history and politics of development cooperation and aid that inform development agendas.

This course aims to provide a knowledge base on the ways with which development practice is concretely carried out through various methods of project design and intervention. It will also prepare students to engage with various actors and institutions within the architecture of development practice and politics while being reflective of their own positionality and vision for change in this world. They will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with current approaches being used to plan development projects and programs. They will come to know about complex global, national and local development institutions and networks of relationships between international development donors, national states, NGOs, professionals, and ‘recipient’ communities as they coalesce around, adapt or negotiate development agendas. Finally, they will also reflect on the role played by development professionals who advance such agendas and interface with so-called beneficiary groups.

Emerging insights from development practice over the years also shed light on the dynamic yet unequal terms of engagement and knowledge transfers between the Global North and Global South.

DEVS 220-001/700:  Introduction to Indigenous Studies (Fall)
Delivery:  Arts and Science Online (Asynchronous)
An introduction to Indigenous ways of knowing organized on a historical basis, from creation to present day, emphasizing Indigenous cultures and experiences in Canada. Students will critically examine colonialism. Indigenous perspectives will be introduced through lecture, reading and assignments, and from contributions from elders, members of Indigenous communities and Indigenous scholars.

DEVS 221-700: Indigenous Studies II (Winter)
Delivery:  Arts and Science Online (Asynchronous)
DEVS 221 is a core course in the Indigenous Studies Major/Minor curriculum focused entirely on the socio-cultural, political, and economic dimensions of indigenous resurgence and revitalisation. Through this course, DEVS affirms PICRDI by enacting the TRC Calls to Action challenges for post-secondary institutions to help revitalize Indigenous culture, Indigenous language, and Indigenous Knowledge. We intend the course to help contribute to the TRC call to affirm UNDRIP cooperative protections of Indigenous Peoples’ intellectual properties and cultural heritage by institutions like Queen’s University.

DEVS 230-001:  The Global Political Economy of Development (Fall)
Delivery:  Lecture Remote Synchronous with in-person tutorials
This course introduces students to important debates, concepts and themes in the global political economy of development. Using a political economy perspective, we examine how different types of power relations are formed around the production, distribution and consumption of goods across local, national and international settings. We also examine how these power relations structure the institutions, processes and outcomes of global development.  The course proceeds historically starting with an examination of the ways in which post-colonial countries were integrated into the world economy in the decades following the Second World War. Subsequently, we use this as a basis to examine more contemporary issues including good governance, free trade, and corporate social responsibility. No prior study of economics is needed for this course – we will be concerned with the real world of development, not abstract mathematical models.

DEVS 230-700:  The Global Political Economy of Development (Winter)
Delivery:  Arts and Science Online (Asynchronous)
This course introduces students to important debates, concepts and themes in the global political economy of development. Using a political economy perspective, we examine how different types of power relations are formed around the production, distribution and consumption of goods across local, national and international settings. We also examine how these power relations structure the institutions, processes and outcomes of global development.  The course proceeds historically starting with an examination of the ways in which post-colonial countries were integrated into the world economy in the decades following the Second World War. Subsequently, we use this as a basis to examine more contemporary issues including good governance, free trade, and corporate social responsibility. No prior study of economics is needed for this course – we will be concerned with the real world of development, not abstract mathematical models.

DEVS 240-001:  Culture and Development (Winter)
Delivery:  Lecture and tutorials in person
This course will explore how theories and practices of 'development' are entwined with different conceptions of culture. It starts by examining how the West constructed itself as the civilizing force in the world and viewed the mass poverty of 'Third World' peoples as a product of their conservative traditions and cultural practices. The course will examine ways that colonial perceptions and practices still imbue development discourse today, and how they are being challenged. How have new social movements, art forms, and technologies opened up to engage with, resist and contest the current model of market driven development, and how does the latter incorporate or co-opt the critiques? Specific topics will include science, religion, sports, art and music. After completing the course, students should be able to demonstrate a critical awareness of everyday events in the Global South and among indigenous peoples as reported, for example, in the media or as performed through hip-hop and the many other forms of resistance culture.

DEVS 250-001:  Global Environmental Transformations (Winter)
Delivery:  Lecture Remote Asynchronous with in-person tutorials
Examines the relationship between development and environmental change by introducing social science perspectives on themes including energy, agriculture, climate, urbanization, and water.  With a focus on combining macro and microanalysis, the course reflects on the meaning of development in an era of global environmental transformation.

DEVS 260-001:  Globalization, Gender, and Development (Fall)
Delivery:  Lecture Remote Synchronous with in-person tutorials
Does globalization differentially impact women? Can women be really “integrated” into development? What does it mean to be a poor woman in the Global South? What do terms like ‘gender’, ‘empowerment’, ‘community building’, used freely by development agencies, imply in relation to women and men? What do we understand by feminization of poverty or feminization of agriculture? Can local feminism or transnational solidarity feminist linkages challenge globalization and reshape women’s lives?

The course answers these questions and more! It undertakes a critical analysis of the impact of globalization and development process and policies on the status of women in the Global South on the one hand, and the role of masculinity, sexuality, and patriarchy in shaping relations between men and women on the other hand. It constantly examines the intersections of these two processes on how poor rural and urban women’s and, by extension, men’s lives are shaped and changed. To facilitate an inter-disciplinary analysis, the course is divided in three sections. The first section provides a theoretical foundation to the course by introducing key concepts and debates around gender and development.

It undertakes a feminist critique of globalization and development and the role of main actors in gender and development planning and policy implementation. The second section undertakes a thematic study of the gendered impact of globalization and development processes on issues such as intimate gender relations, labour practices, agriculture, and migration strategies. In the third part, the politics of engagement, at the local, national, and international levels by women through their resistance strategies, activism, political participation, and/or community mobilization. Throughout the course, case studies are used to illustrate the challenges faced by men and women around the world and the gendered strategies of empowerment and activism.

DEVS 280-700:  Global Engagement (Fall)
Delivery:  Arts and Science Online (Asynchronous)
This course explores current thinking around the motivations for, and ethical implications of, working with communities on issues of social justice, inequality, and sustainable development. Students will engage in self-reflexive practices and work collaboratively to create tools and action plans for ethical global engagement in the future.

DEVS 300-001:  Cross-Cultural Research Methods (Fall)
Delivery:  Lecture and tutorials in person
How do we go from an idea or question to designing a research project to answer it?  Students will learn how to prepare and design cross-cultural research projects for international development work, to understand and use selected methods from a critical perspective, to understand important elements underlying successful fieldwork and to learn to develop a development research proposal. We will cover research design, choosing the instruments, cross-checking and in-the-field analysis, entering the field, choosing the informants, analyzing the data and proposal writing.

DEVS 340-001:  Theories of Development (Winter)
Delivery:  Lecture and tutorials in person
This course introduces students to various theories that attempt to explain what ‘development’ is, how it occurs (or why it does not occur) and to whose benefit. Despite the frequent use of the term ‘development’ in academic, policy and journalistic writings, there is little consensus on what it actually entails – or even if some discernable process exists at all.  For example, while modernisation theory suggests that development is a sequence of structural changes that all societies eventually go through; post-development theories argue that the notion of ‘development’ is merely a rhetorical device that reproduces power relations between the West and the Rest. To begin to understand these debates – and the political issues at stake – we survey several broad areas of development theory including classical political economy, modernisation theory, dependency theory, neoclassicism, neoinstitutionalism, Marxism, post-colonialism, post-development, feminist theories and global political-ecology.

DEVS 352-001:  Technology and Development (Winter)
Delivery:  Lecture and tutorials in person
This course explores and analyse different theoretical and practical perspectives on technology and development. Students apply their evolving collective understanding to the creation of a proposal for a technology related development project. Throughout the course, we introduce students to the socio-economic, cultural, and political factors surrounding technology and its relationship to the development in both advanced industrial societies and developing nations. We focus in particular on the interaction of politics and policy with technological choice and design, critically exploring ideas including appropriate, intermediate and sustainable technologies.

DEVS 353-001:  Business and Development (Winter)
Delivery:  Lecture and tutorials in person.
Over the past several decades, business – particularly large multinational corporations - have come to play an increasingly dominant role in global development. This course will interrogate the structures, processes and practices employed by corporations as they forge new partnerships with states, inter-governmental organizations (e.g., the United Nations), non-governmental organizations. In so doing, we will use lectures, tutorials and case studies to learn about the anatomy of corporate power (legal structure, governance and decision-making processes) and how this power is brokered across the globe through themes such as: divestment campaigns, microcredit, and shelter loans for slum dwellers, corporate philanthropy, disaster management, the sustainable development goals, and corporate social responsibility.

DEVS 354-001:  Cities and Urbanization in the South (Winter)
Delivery:  Lecture and tutorials in person         
This course examines cities and urbanization in countries in the South, looking at similarities and differences between and across regions, and the extent to which these cities connect (or not) with urban areas in the North.

DEVS 356-001:  The Political Economy of Resource Extraction (Fall)
Delivery:  Lecture Remote Synchronous
The Political Economy of Resource Extraction This course analyzes the political economy of resource extraction, focusing on Canadian extraction, domestically and globally. Students will critically examine historical and contemporary extraction and its role in economies, livelihoods and transnational movement (e.g. migration and colonialism) and explore alternative extractive futures.

DEVS 358-001:  NGO Policymaking and Development (Fall)
Delivery:  Lecture Remote Synchronous
Non-governmental organization (NGOs) have become key actors in the world of development influencing both the decision-making process and policy implementation. This course aims to provide students with basic knowledge and skills in preparation for work in the NGOs’ sector and a critical overview of the major issues involved in their interventions. The first part of the course introduces students to critical theories and debates on NGOs’ governance, state-society relationships, and democracy. Special attention is given to the role and effectiveness of NGOs to influence the decision-making process and to impact policy implementation. The second part of the course focuses on NGOs’ managerial practices and knowledges and the challenges and constraints associated with their growing dependency on external funding. Thus, students explore aspects such as NGOs’ organisational management, legitimacy and accountability, the way these organisations facilitate capacity development, and NGOs future opportunities. Using a case-based approach, in the third part of the course students analyze the structures, missions and intervention approaches in a variety of international NGO areas such as agricultural development, poverty reduction, climate change adaptation and mitigation, women’s rights, and humanitarian relief.

DEVS 361-700:  Policy Advocacy and Field-Specific Preparation (Fall)
Delivery:  Arts and Science Online (Asynchronous)
The course prepares students for fieldwork in global development. It connects theory with practice through in‐depth, skills‐based modules on economic literacy, results‐based management (RBM), and policy advocacy. Students will apply core concepts and best practices to effective proposal writing, project management, and policy advocacy.

DEVS 363-001:  Contemporary Southern Africa:  Development Trends and Challenges (Fall)
Delivery:  Lecture and tutorials in person
This course first provides the historical and regional context necessary to understand urban southern Africa’s contemporary struggles, then examines strategies to address key development challenges and how they may be creating opportunities for new ways of thinking about citizenship in South Africa and the Global South more generally.

DEVS 392-001:  The (De) Colonial Struggle (Winter)
Delivery:  Lecture in person
This course will challenge students to critically examine the ways in which imperialism and colonialism has shaped the social, political, historical and economic landscapes of settler states, and the academy's entanglement in this process. The first part of this course focuses on the relational dynamics between the colonizer and the colonized, elucidating how this relationship has impacted historic and contemporary understandings of indigeneity and sovereignty. The latter part of the course addresses the various ways that both Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples work towards decolonization through processes of ‘unlearning’ and represencing.

DEVS 392-002:  Higher Education and Development (Winter)
Delivery:  Lecture in person
United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), access to tertiary education is positioned as a key target, and universities as instrumental in driving all of the goals of development. But are universities equipped to fulfill this role? And if so, what kind of university might do so? In a world struggling with complex environmental and social problems seemingly impervious to current solutions, how might higher education ‘enlarge the space of the possible’ rather than just ‘replicate the existing possible’?

This course explores the interplay between concepts of development and educational development, specifically at the tertiary level. It enables students to understand the role of higher education in development processes by engaging critically with theory and research, through exploration of case studies of development practice involving universities in the Global South, and their local and global partners. Theoretically, the course draws from studies in three fields of enquiry: higher education, global education policy, and education and international development, as well as the broader field of development studies. A capstone project will enable students to design learning experiences that institutes of higher education might develop to achieve lasting impact.

DEVS 393-001:  Covid19 in the Global South (Fall)
Delivery:  Lecture and tutorials in person
The effects of Covid-19 have been highly unequal around the world, with low-income communities in the Global South amongst the worst affected by its direct health impacts and its indirect social, economic and political fallout. Uneven access to health care facilities, lack of support for lost incomes, racialized discrimination, and authoritarian restrictions on movement are just a few examples of the ways in which Covid-19 has served to exacerbate global inequalities.  And yet, some governments and communities in the Global South have handled Covid-19 in remarkably positive ways, managing its spread and mitigating its effects. This course will provide a survey of how Covid-19 is unfolding in different regions/countries as well as examining a range of thematic issues such as migrant workers, access to clean water, impacts on official development assistance, and the gendered nature of the pandemic.

DEVS 393-006:  Climate Change and Disaster Risk (Fall)
Delivery:  Lecture and tutorials in person
The world is experiencing increasing incidences of extreme and slow onset climate change events and intensifying disasters. Cyclones, floods, heat waves and longer dry spells are now more intense and frequent, having immediate- and long-term adverse effects on agriculture, water systems, urban living, and food security. Globally, marginalized groups least responsible for climate change are also its most vulnerable. Climate change and disasters thus exacerbate already existing and unjust conditions of vulnerability and insecurity. The first part of the course will examine the ontological framings of climate change, disaster risk, vulnerability and resilience from various intellectual streams such as: risk/hazards, ecological resilience, and political ecology. The second part will explore how these ontological framings translate into practical responses and programs such as climate change adaptation, mitigation, resilience-building, and disaster risk reduction. Despite considerable traction and resources that characterize these programs today, there is heightened concern and unease that unjust conditions of vulnerability continue unaddressed. Finally, in the search for counterpoint pathways, the course will be bookended by visions and platforms that imagine more ecologically just, ‘care-ful’ and convivial futures envisaged by the climate, gender and environmental justice and degrowth-oriented scholars and movements.


Teaching Assistantships are filled according to Group Preferences set out in the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University and the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC 901 http://psac901.org/).

First Preference – Group A

Is for qualified graduate students registered as:

  • Students in a department or program in which the TAship will be offered; or
  • Students in an interdisciplinary program with TA budget resources, and for whom the TAship has been granted as part of the funding commitment offered by Queen’s University.

Second Preference – Group B

Is for qualified graduate students registered as:

  • Students in a department or program in which the TAship will be offered; or
  • Students in an interdisciplinary program with TA budget resources,

and for whom

  • the TAship will not form part of the funding commitment offered by Queen’s University; or
  • there is currently no funding commitment provided by Queen’s University               

Third Preference – Group C

Is for qualified graduate students who have previously held a TAship or TFship for Queen’s University.

Fourth Preference – Group D

Is for qualified graduate students who have not met the criteria as set out above in Group A, B, or C.


APPLICATION PROCESS

Applications are being accepted immediately and are due no later than Thursday August 5, 2021.  Please ensure you indicate which applicant group you are in.

Group A Applicants

Please complete and submit the Application Form indicating course preferences.

Groups B, C and D Applicants

Please complete and submit the Application Form to indicate course preferences and submit a cover letter and curriculum vitae outlining academic accomplishments and relevant experience along with your unofficial transcript to Carrie Roosenmaallen at  devsgrad@queensu.ca.  Please note that incomplete applications will not be considered.

Click here to review the TAShip opportunities in PDF format.