The Department of Global Development Studies has Teaching Assistantships available in the following courses for 2022‐2023 academic year. TAships are filled according to Group Preferences set out in the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University and the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC 901 http://psac901.org/).

Applications are due no later than Monday July 18, 2022

DEVS 101-001 Development Studies in Global Perspective
Fall Term
Instructor: Marcus Taylor

Explores the relationships between global economic integration, technological change, environmental sustainability, political systems, and cultural diversity. Introduces essential interdisciplinary perspectives for complex global challenges from poverty to climate change and builds the foundations for ethical cross-cultural engagement.

DEVS 102-001 Canada in the World
Winter Term
Instructor: Rebecca Hall

Canada in the World will help students build knowledge and analytical capacities in global development, with a focus on Canada. The course examines how processes of global development are differentiated across borders and axes of gender, racialization, and colonization. Students will explore applications of theories of global change.

DEVS 100AB-700 Canada and the "Third” World
Fall Term and Winter Term ONLINE ONLY
Instructor: Mark Hostetler

Introduces basic theoretical concepts of development studies, the history of global inequality, and short histories of alternative development strategies. Case studies of Canada’s ties to the so‐called third world will include missionaries, military, business, and aid. Canadian colonialism over First Nations peoples will introduce basic issues in Aboriginal Studies.

DEVS 210-001 Development in Practice
Winter Term
Instructor: Bernadette Resurrección   

Development in Practice focuses on institutional efforts to frame, plan, and manage development and change towards sustainable, just, and positive outcomes. It will examine political negotiations in setting strategic development agendas and goals. It also includes critically learning about practical planning approaches used in development program. The history of international development policy and aid is complex, a mixture of hopeful altruism, negotiated agreement, diverse interests, and difficult reality. Development policy and practice is a matter of framing: defining development problems such as persistent poverty, environmental insecurity, and social inequality in much of the developing world often designing different approaches to mitigate and address such problems. Many of these problems over the last 50 years have remained or escalated. Thus, Development Studies is frequently linked, directly or indirectly, to policy – to action – which is the core area of work and responsibility of development practice and often the career trajectory of the development expert. Development in practice is about the workings of development; it is about the ‘doing’ and ‘planning’ of development, which is fraught with political stakes, interests and unexpected outcomes despite contemporary technocratic efforts to predict, manage and govern its conduct. It is the need to roadmap and govern development. Students will have the opportunity to understand a brief history and politics of development cooperation and aid that inform development agendas. This course aims to provide a knowledge base on the ways with which development practice is concretely carried out through various methods of project design and intervention. It will also prepare students to engage with various actors and institutions within the architecture of development practice and politics while being reflective of their own positionality and vision for change in this world. They will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with current approaches being used to plan development projects and programs. They will come to know about complex global, national and local development institutions and networks of relationships between international development donors, national states, NGOs, professionals, and ‘recipient’ communities as they coalesce around, adapt or negotiate development agendas. Finally, they will also reflect on the role played by development professionals who advance such agendas and interface with so-called beneficiary groups. Emerging insights from development practice over the years also shed light on the dynamic yet unequal terms of engagement and knowledge transfers between the Global North and Global South.

DEVS 220-700 Aboriginal Studies
Fall Term ONLINE ONLY
Instructor: Ian Fanning   

An introduction to Indigenous ways of knowing organized on a historical basis, from creation to present day, emphasizing Indigenous cultures and experiences in Canada. Students will critically examine colonialism. Indigenous perspectives will be introduced through lecture, reading and assignments, and from contributions from elders, members of Indigenous communities and Indigenous scholars.

DEVS 221-001Topics in Aboriginal Studies
Winter Term
Instructor: Ian Fanning   

Indigenous Studies II highlights the resilience and resistance of Indigenous communities as they grapple with gendered settler colonialism. The course examines Indigenous knowledge and governance within the settler nation state and the re-building of Indigenous communities. Topics include contemporary issues in Indigenous healing, art, teaching and learning, Indigenous activism, and socio-political life. Students engage in work that centers the voices of Indigenous peoples.

DEVS 230-001 The Global Political Economy of Development
Fall Term
Instructor: Susanne Soederberg   

This course introduces students to important debates, concepts and themes in global development. Using a political economy perspective, we examine how different types of power relations are formed around the production, distribution and consumption of goods across local, national and international settings. We also examine how these power relations structure the institutions, processes and outcomes of ‘global development’. The course proceeds historically starting with an examination of the ways in which post‐ colonial countries were integrated into the world economy in the decades following the Second World War. Subsequently, we use this as a basis to examine more contemporary issues including good governance, free trade, corporate social responsibility, and the role of NGOs.

DEVS 230-700 The Global Political Economy of Development
Winter Term ONLINE
Instructor: Mark Hostetler   

This course introduces students to important debates, concepts and themes in the global political economy of development. Using a political economy perspective, we examine how different types of power relations are formed around the production, distribution and consumption of goods across local, national and international settings. We also examine how these power relations structure the institutions, processes and outcomes of global development. The course proceeds historically starting with an examination of the ways in which post-colonial countries were integrated into the world economy in the decades following the Second World War. Subsequently, we use this as a basis to examine more contemporary issues including good governance, free trade, and corporate social responsibility. No prior study of economics is needed for this course – we will be concerned with the real world of development, not abstract mathematical models.

DEVS 240-700 Culture and Development
Fall Term ONLINE
Instructor: Ayca Tomac   

This course will explore how theories and practices of 'development' are entwined with different conceptions of culture. It starts by examining how the West constructed itself as the civilising force in the world and viewed the mass poverty of 'Third World' peoples as a product of their conservative traditions and cultural practices. The course will examine ways that colonial perceptions and practices still imbue development discourse today, and how they are being challenged. How have new social movements, art forms, and technologies opened up to engage with, resist and contest the current model of market driven development, and how does the latter incorporate or co-opt the critiques? Specific topics will include science, religion, sports, art and music. After completing the course, students should be able to demonstrate a critical awareness of everyday events in the Global South and among indigenous peoples as reported, for example, in the media or as performed through hip hop and the many other forms of resistance culture.

DEVS 240-001 Culture and Development
Winter Term
Instructor: Ayca Tomac   

This course will explore how theories and practices of 'development' are entwined with different conceptions of culture. It starts by examining how the West constructed itself as the civilising force in the world and viewed the mass poverty of 'Third World' peoples as a product of their conservative traditions and cultural practices. The course will examine ways that colonial perceptions and practices still imbue development discourse today, and how they are being challenged. How have new social movements, art forms, and technologies opened up to engage with, resist and contest the current model of market driven development, and how does the latter incorporate or co-opt the critiques? Specific topics will include science, religion, sports, art and music. After completing the course, students should be able to demonstrate a critical awareness of everyday events in the Global South and among indigenous peoples as reported, for example, in the media or as performed through hip hop and the many other forms of resistance culture.

DEVS 250-001 Global Environmental Transformations
Winter Term
Instructor: Marcus Taylor   

Examines the relationship between development and environmental change by introducing social science perspectives on themes including energy, agriculture, climate, urbanisation and water. With a focus on combining macro‐¬‐ and micro‐¬‐ analysis, the course reflects on the meaning of development in an era of global environmental transformation.

DEVS 260-001 Globalization Gender and Development
Fall Term
Instructor: Reena Kukreja   

This course is designed for those interested in undertaking a critical analysis of the gendered impact of the globalization process and development policies with a focus on women in the Global South.

DEVS 280-700 Global Engagement
Winter Term ONLINE
Instructor: Kathryn Fizzell   

This course explores current thinking around the motivations for, and ethical implications of, working with communities on issues of social justice, inequality, and sustainable development. Students will engage in self‐ reflexive practices and work collaboratively to create tools and action plans for ethical global engagement in the future.

DEVS 293-001 Global Health
Fall Term
Instructor: Kilian Atuoye   

This course examines the nexus between global health and development with a focus on preparing students for work on contemporary health and wellbeing issues. It takes a multidisciplinary perspective, but largely from the field of social science, to analyze current global challenges including environmental and social transformations, and changing disease burden. Using case studies, students will learn important concepts and principles in global health and development. Innovative approaches that bridge global health and development will also be introduced in this course.

DEVS 300-001 Cross‐Cultural Research Methods
Fall Term
Instructor: Mark Hostetler   

A study of practical issues related to development research and program evaluation in development settings, using a case‐study approach. Topics include information retrieval, cross‐cultural research methods, basic data analysis, and results‐based project evaluation.

DEVS 306-001 Cuban Culture and Society I
Winter Term
Instructor: Karen Dubinsky and Susan Lord  

This course introduces students to Cuban society and culture. The focus is on the period from the Cuban revolution (1959) to the present. Students will examine some of the main events and highlights of Cuban history, politics and culture in this era. This is a prerequisite for DEVS 307 Cuban Culture and Society II, held in Havana during the Spring Term.

DEVS 340-001 Theories of Development
Winter Term
Instructor: Paritosh Kumar   

This course introduces students to various theories that attempt to explain what ‘development’ is, how it occurs (or why it does not occur) and to whose benefit. Despite the frequent use of the term ‘development’ in academic, policy and journalistic writings, there is little consensus on what it actually entails – or even if some discernable process exists at all. For example, while modernisation theory suggests that development is a sequence of structural changes that all societies eventually go through; post-development theories argue that the notion of ‘development’ is merely a rhetorical device that reproduces power relations between the West and the Rest. To begin to understand these debates – and the political issues at stake – we survey several broad areas of development theory including classical political economy, modernisation theory, dependency theory, neoclassicism, neoinstitutionalism, Marxism, post-colonialism, post-development, feminist theories and global political-ecology.

DEVS 352-001 Technology and Development
Winter Term
Instructor: Diane Cordoba   

This course teams Arts and Science with Applied Science students to explore and analyse different theoretical and practical perspectives on technology and development. Students then apply their evolving collective understanding to the creation of a proposal for a technology related development project. Throughout the course, we introduce students to the socio-economic, cultural and political factors surrounding technology and its relationship to the development in both advanced industrial societies and developing nations. We focus in particular on the interaction of politics and policy with technological choice and design, critically exploring ideas including appropriate, intermediate and sustainable technologies.

DEVS 356-001: The Political Economy of Resource Extraction
Fall Term
Instructor: Rebecca Hall   

This course analyzes the political economy of resource extraction, focusing on Canadian extraction, domestically and globally. Students will critically examine historical and contemporary extraction and its role in economies, livelihoods and transnational movement (e.g. migration and colonialism) and explore alternative extractive futures.

DEVS 358-001: Non‐Governmental Organisations, Policy Making, and Development
Fall Term
Instructor: Diana Córdoba   

Non‐governmental organization (NGOs) have become key actors in the world of development influencing both the decision‐making process and policy implementation. This course aims to provide students with basic knowledge and skills in preparation for work in the NGOs’ sector and a critical overview of the major issues involved in their interventions. The first part of the course introduces students to critical theories and debates on NGOs’ governance, state‐society relationships and democracy. Special attention is given to the role and effectiveness of NGOs to influence the decision‐making process and to impact policy implementation. The second part of the course focuses on NGOs’ managerial practices and knowledges and the challenges and constraints associated with their growing dependency on external funding. Thus, students explore aspects such as NGOs’ organisational management, legitimacy and accountability, the way these organisations facilitate capacity development, and NGOs future opportunities. Using a case‐based approach, in the third part of the course students analyze the structures, missions and intervention approaches in a variety of international NGO areas such as agricultural development, poverty reduction, climate change adaptation and mitigation, women’s rights, and humanitarian relief.

DEVS 361-700 Policy Advocacy in Global Development
Fall Term ONLINE
Instructor: Scott Rutherford   

This course is designed to equip students with critical understanding of strategies, techniques and mindsets that can help social movements and other justice-oriented organizations contribute to policy advocacy in Global Development. This course connects theory with practice through four in-depth modules on policy advocacy in Global Development. Through independent historical and sociological research students will apply core concepts and best practices to develop new understandings about the challenges of designing a public campaign aimed at legal and policy changes toward the goal of global justice advocacy. Students will also learn to assess where policy advocacy fits within a broader spectrum of transformative societal change.

Note: This course no longer includes project planning. Students interested in project planning are encouraged to take DEVS 210 (Development in Practice)

DEVS 363-001 Contemporary Southern Africa: Development Trends and Challenges
Fall Term
Instructor: Marc Epprecht   

This course first provides the historical and regional context necessary to understand urban southern Africa’s contemporary struggles, then examines strategies to address key development challenges and how they may be creating opportunities for new ways of thinking about citizenship in South Africa and the Global South more generally.

DEVS 365-001 Trade and Investment in the Global South
Fall Term
Instructor: Kyla Tienhaara   

As we enter the third decade of the 21st century, the future of globalization is highly uncertain. The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the fragility of global supply chains for everything from medical equipment to basic food supplies and has led many to argue that countries need to be more self-sufficient. But even before the pandemic hit, there was trouble brewing. The turn to more mercantilist policies by President Trump brought the term “trade war” back into vogue and the “rules-based” order for trade and investment into crisis. In this course, students will examine this shifting landscape and what it means in a development context. Would the breakdown of the World Trade Organization (WTO) benefit or hurt countries in the Global South? What does the regionalization of trade rules mean for the “development agenda”? Students will also critically assess alternatives to the current system, with a focus on fair trade. Finally, the course will address the intersection between global trade and investment and the climate crisis.

DEVS 392-001Transitions to Youth-Inclusive Peacebuilding
Winter Term
Instructor: Alina Dixon   

Young people are often some of the most severely impacted by conflicts yet are continually excluded from the spaces, processes, knowledge creation, and decisions that attempt to reconstruct communities and build lasting peace after conflict. Part One of this course is devoted to engagement with the theoretical roots of youth exclusion from peacebuilding and the emerging debates that are carving out new spaces for the contributions of young people. Part Two will apply this theoretical grounding to a range of practical examples of youth peacebuilding across a variety of geographic locations. Some of the topics we will explore in Part Two include healing through performance art in Uganda and Parkour as peacebuilding in Gaza. The course offers an approach to the study of youth peacebuilding lies at the intersection of the theory of youth as peacebuilders and the practical experiences of youth themselves.

DEVS 392-002 Talk DEVS to Me: Communicating Development
Winter Term
Instructor: Hannah Ascough   

When we talk about “development”, we are talking about growth as a marker of “progress”. And when “development” talks, it too is steeped in a growth-oriented mindset which values prosperity, and justifies (neo)colonial, capitalist violences. In this course, we will first critically engage with “development” in its conceptual forms, grounding our study of development communication in theoretical perspectives, and interrogating where hegemonic development values are re/produced in mainstream, popular media. We will then look at the strategies development organizations employ to sell “growth”, and identify the corresponding political agendas these discourses justify. Finally, we will turn to alternative iterations of development, and the discursive strategies employed by activists, community organizers, and artists to incite resistance. Throughout the course, we will engage a plurality of development materials – including theory, movies, poetry, NGO advertising, and more – to better understand how development discourses seep into and reflect everyday life, and to learn to communicate our own creative, alternative development messages.

DEVS 392-003 Development in Race
Winter Term
Instructor: Brandon Pryce   

“How have racial identities been socially created, contested, and resisted within contemporary discourses around development? This seminar will introduce students to the topics of race, racialization, and racism to critically examine how these issues impact development in both theory and practice. From historical debates around the creation of racial(ized) identities, to the 2020 murder of George Floyd, this course unpacks race as a key factor in development approaches and outcomes. The course outlines how development discourse is simultaneously steeped in racist and racialized language and practices, while also functioning as a key site for the creation and distribution of racist and racialized dialogue.”

DEVS 393-001 Covid19 in the Global South
Fall Term
Instructor: David McDonald   

The effects of Covid-19 have been highly unequal around the world, with low-income communities in the Global South amongst the worst affected by its direct health impacts and its indirect social, economic and political fallout. Uneven access to health care facilities, lack of support for lost incomes, racialized discrimination, and authoritarian restrictions on movement are just a few examples of the ways in which Covid-19 has served to exacerbate global inequalities. And yet, some governments and communities in the Global South have handled Covid-19 in remarkably positive ways, managing its spread and mitigating its effects. This course will provide a survey of how Covid-19 is unfolding in different regions/countries as well as examining a range of thematic issues such as migrant workers, access to clean water, impacts on official development assistance, and the gendered nature of the pandemic.

DEVS 393-005 Climate Change and Disaster Risk
Fall Term
Instructor: Bernadette Resurrección   

The world is experiencing increasing extreme and slow onset climate change events and intensifying disasters. Cyclones, floods, heat waves and longer dry spells are now more intense and frequent, having immediate- and long-term adverse effects on agriculture, water systems, urban living, and food security. Globally, marginalized groups least responsible for climate change are also its most vulnerable. Climate change and disasters thus exacerbate already existing and unjust conditions of vulnerability and insecurity. The first part of the course will examine the ontological framings of climate change, disaster risk, vulnerability and resilience from various intellectual streams such as: risk/hazards, ecological resilience, and political ecology. The second part will explore how these ontological framings translate into practical responses and programs such as climate change adaptation, mitigation, resilience-building, and disaster risk reduction. Despite considerable traction and resources that characterize these programs today, there is heightened concern and unease that unjust conditions of vulnerability continue unaddressed. Finally, in the search for counterpoint pathways, the course will be bookended by visions and platforms that imagine more ecologically just, ‘care-ful’ and convivial futures envisaged by the climate, gender and environmental justice and degrowth-oriented scholars and movements.

DEVS 393-001 Land Politics and Health
Winter Term
Instructor: Kilian Atuoye   

This course explores the complexity of land politics and its implications for health and health promotion at local and global levels. It starts by conceptualizing land politics as deeply steeped in political ecologies which produce and reinforce health inequities. With such theoretical framing, students will learn the situatedness of contemporary concepts and processes in land politics (including environmental appropriation, exploitation, dispossession, and repossession) in broader discourses of environmental (in)justice and sustainability. It will also discuss how power and politics over land access are organized and operationalized at multiple scales to influence longstanding health inequalities. The course will conclude by examining ways in which global health can benefit from equity in land politics, and assist students to examine their future roles in promoting healthy environments and healthy populations through ‘equitable land reforms’ in communities and at the global level.

Teaching Assistantships are filled according to Group Preferences set out in the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University and the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC 901 http://psac901.org/).

First Preference – Group A
Is for qualified graduate students registered as: I. Students in a department or program in which the TAship will be offered; or II. Students in an interdisciplinary program with TA budget resources, and for whom the TAship has been granted as part of the funding commitment offered by Queen’s University.
 
Second Preference – Group B
Is for qualified graduate students registered as: I. Students in a department or program in which the TAship will be offered; or II. Students in an interdisciplinary program with TA budget resources; and III. who are in their first unfunded year of their graduate studies program

Third Preference – Group C
Is for qualified graduate students registered as: I. Students in a department or program in which the TAship will be offered; or II. Students in an interdisciplinary program with TA budget resources, and for whom III. the TAship will not form part of the funding commitment offered by Queen’s University; or IV. there is currently no funding commitment provided by Queen’s University.
 
Fourth Preference – Group D
Is for qualified graduate students who have previously held a TAship or TFship for Queen’s University.

Fifth Preference – Group E
Is for qualified graduate students who have not met the criteria as set out above in Group A, B, C, or D.

APPLICATION PROCESS
Applications are being accepted immediately and are due no later than Monday July 18, 2022.

Please ensure you indicate which applicant group you are in.


Group A and B Applicants
Please complete and submit the Application Form indicating course preferences.


Groups C, D and E Applicants
Please complete and submit the Application Form to indicate course preferences and submit a cover letter and curriculum vitae outlining academic accomplishments and relevant experience along with your unofficial transcript to Carrie Roosenmaallen at devsgrad@queensu.ca. Please note that incomplete applications will not be considered.

Position Posting PDF

POSTED:  16Jun2022

 

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