Department of Global Development Studies

DEPARTMENT OF

Global Development Studies

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Global Development Studies 2020-2021 Graduate Courses

 

DEVS 801/3.0 The Political Economy of Development (Fall)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the relationship between political economy and the ideas and practices of development.  The course grounds students in core theories, both classical and contemporary.  It then examines key themes and controversies to illustrate the relationships between political economy and development practice.

This is a mandatory course for all MA and PhD graduate students in Global Development Studies.

Available only to MA and PhD students.

Instructor:  Susanne Soederberg

DEVS 802/3.0  The Cultural Politics of Development (Fall)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the cultural politics of development in historical and contemporary perspective.  The course focuses on narratives of development and their relationship to social and political movements in the South and North.  Themes include the ideas of tradition, modernity and progress; colonialism, nationalism and liberation; and the gendered and racialised politics of development.

This is a mandatory course for all MA and PhD graduate students in Global Development Studies.

Available only to MA and PhD students.

Instructor:  Reena Kukreja

DEVS 803/3.0  Qualitative Research Methods and Fieldwork (Winter)

Provides students with core skills in qualitative fieldwork planning, design and implementation. With a focus on the ethics of conducting research in development settings and the role of research in social change, the course addresses key qualitative methods and techniques such as interviewing, participant observation, participatory research, and data management and analysis.

This is a mandatory course for all PhD graduate students in Global Development Studies, and highly recommended for all MA graduate students.

Available only to MA and PhD students.

Instructor:  Bernadette Resurrección

DEVS 811/3.0  State Transformations, Resistance and Social Change in The Global South (Winter)

The powers and limitations of the state and the relation between the state and society have received renewed attention in development theory in recent years. Scholars have developed new perspectives of analysis to understand how increasingly globalized and transnational capitalism tends to undermine the sovereignty and territoriality of the state and generates new forms of resistance to state power. This seminar aims to provide insights into these new perspectives. Key topics and contested issues in the literature on emerging forms of state in the Global South, social movements and other non-state actors will be systematically discussed. There will also be a focus on Latin America where states together with social movements have played a crucial role in the dynamics of social change over the last decade and effectively challenged the larger neo-liberal program. The readings and discussions will cross disciplinary boundaries within the social sciences, including from political science, sociology, anthropology, geography and political philosophy.

Available only to MA and PhD students.

Instructor:  Diana Cordoba

DEVS 812/3.0  Examining Migration at the intersections of Gender, Race, and Masculinity (Not offered)

In recent years, the study of migration has moved to the centre stage of development policy and development theorisation. As the movement and numbers of migrants has increased globally, populist backlash against certain classes and categories of migrants has gained momentum with restrictive visa and border control regimes and rhetoric of hate. This has thrown theoretical and practical challenges for development studies, most notably the relationships between migration and urbanization, industrialization, precarious work, remittance economy, family structure, gender roles, ideology. There is a pressing need to understand how migration and restrictive border controls are affecting societies and, (re)shaping work strategies, gender relations, gender roles, and masculinity, among others. This course will challenge you to rethink the interface between development and migration by undertaking an analysis of voluntary or involuntary migratory trajectories of people in the contemporary moment. By keeping at the centre of its inquiry, intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality, and masculinity, it will provide cutting-edge theorisation about how these interfaces impact migration patterns, policies, societies, and, most importantly, the lived experiences of the migrants. It will adopt an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on literature ranging from migration studies, critical masculinity studies, and gender studies and diverse material including auto-ethnographies, photovoice, documentaries, and films in facilitating a nuanced theoretical grounding on this subject.

Available only to MA and PhD students.

Instructor:  Reena Kukreja

DEVS 813/3.0  Global Environmental Politics (Winter)

This seminar examines the political challenges of addressing the global environmental crisis. The first half of the course will focus on key moments in the history of global environmental governance from the Stockholm Conference in 1972 to the signing of the Paris Agreement in 2015. Students will explore how various actors (e.g. states, international organizations, scientists, corporations, activists) have shaped the outcomes in these moments for better or worse. The extent to which the “North-South” divide has hindered progress in global environmental governance will also be addressed. In the second half of the course, students will assess efforts to “green” global economic institutions, with particular attention given to the World Bank and the World Trade Organization.

Available only to MA and PhD students.

Instructor:  Kyla Tienhaara

DEVS 850/3.0  Professional Seminar in Global Development Studies (Fall and Winter:  Monthly Sessions)

This course provides a monthly forum to discuss practical, ethical and methodological issues in conducting development research and writing, including major research papers, thesis work, and grant applications.

This is a mandatory course for all graduate students in Global Development Studies.

Instructor:  Mark Hostetler

DEVS 861/3.0  Development and the Global Agro-Food System (Fall)

There can be little doubt that the current era is witnessing dramatic change in the global production and consumption of food. In some respects this represents that continuation of previous trends. However, in number of important ways agricultural restructuring in the late twentieth century appears completely new. Using a diverse disciplinary perspective, this course analyses key aspects of contemporary changes in the global agro-food system. Topics covered will range from industrialization and corporate control of food and farming, the geography of more ‘flexible’ forms of manufacturing and service provisions, feminization of agricultural labour, localized and place-based agriculture, non-agricultural uses of agro-food resources, financialization of food, food sovereignty to new landscapes of consumption, changing forms of political organization and protests and the relationship between food and culture, specifically how communities and societies identify and express themselves through food.

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for DEVS MA graduate students who may not take more than two such mixed courses.

Instructor:  Paritosh Kumar

DEVS 862/3.0  Alliance Politics, Solidarity Movements in the Global Context (Winter)

This course provides an overview of a variety of dissident social movements from around the world with a specific focus on solidarity praxis. It situates itself in relation to both academic and "activist" perspectives on the interconnected power relations such as colonialism, nationalism, neoliberal capitalism and heteropatriarchy in the global context while tracing the dissident engagements with these power relations such as feminist, LGBTQ, socialist, anarchist and anti-colonial movements. Utilizing the critical scholarship on social movements, alliance politics and solidarity building, the course will focus on the relevance and significance of solidarity praxis while analyzing the intersections and interrelations of historical and current tendencies within the dissident movements. The course will equip students with tools to critically engage with the constructions of concepts like identity, "activism", collective action and street politics along with social movements such as indigenous resurgence, feminist, anti-heterosexist organizing and the so-called "Arab Spring", "Occupy" and "Gezi".

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for DEVS MA graduate students who may not take more than two such mixed courses. 

Instructor:  Ayca Tomac

DEVS 863/3.0  Development within Planetary Boundaries? (Not offered)

The concept of sustainable development that first emerged over 30 years ago remains ambiguous and difficult to operationalize. In the past decade, a number of possibly competing concepts of have risen to prominence in international discourse such as ‘green growth’. In this course, we will explore differences between sustainable development and green growth and consider whether either offers a viable path for economic development within planetary boundaries. Additionally, we will compare these mainstream models with some of the more radical proposals for development in the ‘Anthropocene’.

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for DEVS MA graduate students who may not take more than two such mixed courses. 

Instructor:  Kyla Tienhaara

 

DEVS 865/3.0  Political Ecology (Fall)

The interdisciplinary field of Political ecology highlights the relevance of power and politics for shaping the relationship between humans and their environments. It first emerged in the 1970s and 1980s with the specific aim of challenging ‘apolitical’ accounts of human-environment relations that rely upon simplistic causal links between population growth, poverty, environmental degradation and social conflicts. In the first part of this course, we will explore core theoretical, conceptual, and methodological trends and debates in the field of political ecology. In the second part, we will cover a range of cases of environmental problems in various socio-ecological contexts including those concerned with forests, agriculture, water, fisheries and range lands. We will also look for inspiration through the transformative work of organizations, communities and movements crafting solutions to environmental problems. The overall goal of this course is thus to introduce students to important contexts and tools for analyzing the complexity of human systems and their relationships to the natural world and for contributing to solutions to environmental problems.

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for DEVS MA graduate students who may not take more than two such mixed courses.

Instructor:    Diana Cordoba

DEVS 866/3.0  Approaches to Sustainable Livelihood Development (Fall)

Sustainable livelihoods approaches have become increasingly important in the discussion of development over the past few decades. These approaches are concerned with understanding the various resources and strategies that people draw on to construct, improve and defend their livelihoods in ways they find meaningful. In this course, we will explore a variety of related theoretical perspectives including those focused on social (and other) capital, human capabilities, and agency. After reviewing these approaches, we will evaluate their efficacy for analysing a variety of rural, urban, and peri-urban development case studies. Based on our review of theory and its application to case studies, students will be tasked with developing their own framework for analysing livelihoods and identifying possible avenues for contributing to their enhancement.

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for DEVS MA graduate students who may not take more than two such mixed courses.

Instructor:  Mark Hostetler

DEVS 867/3.0 Transnational Feminism and Gender Justice (Not offered)

Through time and across borders, critical feminist theories and practices have sought to do far more than insert women higher in the echelons of global power structures: they have sought to dismantle these power structures, and to imagine and practice a different world. Grounded in the insights of critical feminist theory, this course will focus on sites of feminist struggle, examining both transnational continuities and differentiations in an unequal world. The first half of the course will be devoted to engagement with key theoretical texts in anti-racist and anti-colonial feminisms, Indigenous feminisms, queer feminisms, socialist feminisms and feminist political economy. In the second half of the course, students will apply these theories in the analysis of contemporary transnational feminist struggles (including, but not limited to, transnational care networks; state surveillance of intimate identities and labours; gender-based violence; reproductive rights; and, subsistence and ecological justice).

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for DEVS MA graduate students who may not take more than two such mixed courses.

Instructor:   Rebecca Hall

DEVS 869/3.0  Global Governance (Winter)

Like many fashionable terms in academia and policy making circles, global governance has all too often escaped critical evaluation. Situating this moving target in the wider context of global political economy, we interrogate the institutional, discursive and regulatory features of global governance by exploring a wide variety of contemporary themes and issues, such as global trade, global aid, global risk management, the rule of law, slum rehabilitation, planetary gentrification, corruption and tax havens, and so forth across varied levels of governance ranging from global institutions (World Trade Organisation, European Union, World Bank, World Economic Forum, UN-HABITAT) to national and municipal institutions. In so doing, we ask: who benefits from global governance? Whose values are being promoted, and why? And, finally, who and/or is to be governed, and why?

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for DEVS MA graduate students who may not take more than two such mixed courses..

Instructor:  Susanne Soederberg

DEVS 870/3.0  The ‘African Renaissance’ in Crisis; Capitalism, Climate, and COVID-19 (Fall)

The ‘African renaissance’ is an optimistic vision for sustainable development that marries cultural revival, new technologies and trading partners, and democratization with dynamic forms of local capitalism. Many impressive achievements were made throughout Africa through the 2000s. The Great Recession and growing scientific evidence of climate crisis, however, have since engendered deep reservations about the productivist and anthropocentric assumptions of economic growth. The COVID-19 pandemic has since shattered the model almost completely. This course will evaluate the impacts and implications of the overlapping crises of capitalism, climate and public health upon core tenets of the African renaissance vision. It begins with a critical overview of the history of underdevelopment under colonial and neo-colonial conditions, including through unequal relations in the production of knowledge about Africa. Students then examine a specific proposed development (or crisis mitigation initiative), critically assessing the debates around it leading to mature reflection on “what next”? Topics include: aid versus trade, colonial borders/languages vs. indigenous cultures/languages, tourism, health, human rights, refugees/migration, social media, basic income guarantees, and much more. The major research essay will involve a case study of urban redevelopment in light of these global challenges.

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for DEVS MA graduate students who may not take more than two such mixed courses.

Instructor:  Marc Epprecht

DEVS 871/3.0  Energy Democracy (Fall)

Energy democracy is a relatively new concept that refers to a transformation of the ways in which we produce and consume energy that are more socially and economically just as well as environmentally sustainable. There are radically different visions for what this means in practice, however, with competing notions of what constitutes democratic engagement, who should own and operate energy facilities, what role new technologies should play, etc. This course will focus on electricity in particular, examining spaces of energy poverty and different strategies for improving electricity access and affordability while at the same time expanding democratic engagement and public ownership. The emphasis will be on renewable forms of electricity, comparing energy democracy struggles in the North and the South, with states and communities employing very different strategies to address local contexts while at the same time fighting global challenges such as climate change. Topics to be covered include the shifting roles of (renewable) electricity in global capitalism, the uneven impacts of disruptive technologies, debates over decentralization and decarbonization, and gendered differentials in electricity access.

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for DEVS MA graduate students who may not take more than two such mixed courses.

Instructor:  David McDonald

DEVS 872/3.0  Indigenous Theory (Fall)

In recent years the term indigenous has become popular in describing Aboriginal people in Canada. This course goes beyond the euphemistic and often politically expedient use of the term to explore the meaning of Indigeneity, the emerging scholarship in Indigenous theory, and the current processes of re-indigenization. Students will explore legal and cultural applications of indigenous identity through a variety of contemporary readings and classroom discussions. Areas of interest will be economics, law, social/cultural development, colonization and de-colonization, and predictive futures. While this course will explore Aboriginal identity in Canada as part of the study, the focus is much broader in examining global indigenous realities as well as an expanded theoretical foundation.

Assessment in this course will be based on an individual contract negotiated between the student and professor within the first three weeks of the course beginning. Students will be expected to read all course material, take part in all informed classroom discussions, produce high quality academic writing or other forms of professional presentations, and meet periodically with the instructor.

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for DEVS MA graduate students who may not take more than two such mixed courses.

Instructor:  Robert Lovelace

DEVS 873/3.0  Privatization and its Discontents (Winter)

This course reviews the theory and practice of public versus private provision of essential services such as water, electricity and health care, with a focus on countries in the South. Part One of the course examines neoclassical conceptions of ‘public’ and ‘private’ and the theoretical rationale for privatization. We explore the various ways that services are privatized and commercialized, including a discussion of how these various forms of privatization work in practice and the extent of privatization in countries in the South. Part Two examines alternative conceptualizations of publicness, reviews different critiques of privatization, and explores emerging public alternatives for service delivery, ranging from ‘the commons’ to remunicipalization, as well as the people and organizations driving these developments.

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for DEVS MA graduate students who may not take more than two such mixed courses.

Instructor:  David McDonald

DEVS 874/3.0: Migrants, Race and Work (Winter)

Through time and across borders, critical feminist theories and practices have sought to do far more than insert women higher in the echelons of global power structures: they have sought to dismantle these power structures, and to imagine and practice a different world. Grounded in the insights of critical feminist theory, this course will focus on sites of feminist struggle, examining both transnational continuities and differentiations in an unequal world. The first half of the course will be devoted to engagement with key theoretical texts in anti-racist and anti-colonial feminisms, Indigenous feminisms, queer feminisms, socialist feminisms and feminist political economy. In the second half of the course, students will apply these theories in the analysis of contemporary transnational feminist struggles (including, but not limited to, transnational care networks; state surveillance of intimate identities and labours; gender-based violence; reproductive rights; and, subsistence and ecological justice).

Prerequisite: Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

Instructor:  Reena Kukreja

DEVS 875/3.0 Sport, Justice and Development (Winter)

This course uses sport to examine broader questions related to the cultural politics of development. The course investigates how sport has been implicated in various processes that came to shape the development project’s cultural politics and its more recent iterations in the twenty first century. Students will be asked to consider how through sport we can explore questions of power and agency within development as well as debates surrounding using the culture of sport as an expedient tool to achieve social, economic and political objectives. Moreover, the course asks students to consider the role of sport as praxis to achieve more equitable futures.

Prerequisite: Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

Instructor:  Scott Rutherford

DEVS 876/3.0 Visualizing Culture (Fall)

This course addresses the study and interpretation of social organizations and cultures in everyday life using photography and film. Beginning with a critical analysis of how the visual entered social science research, this course will move towards contemporary approaches that highlight the embodied and sensory dimensions of the visual. Students will complete several image-based projects in order to gain necessary skills associated with visually conveying socio-cultural practice and lived experience. Note: All students must have access to the following technology/resources: • Photography and Video recorder (it can be your smartphone) • An application for editing/making short film (e.g. IMovie) • An application for editing photographs (not required but would be useful) Prerequisite: Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 877/3.0 Politics of Development in the Changing Arctic (Winter)

In this seminar we examine social, economic and political change in the Arctic, with an eye to historical and contemporary issues affecting the region. Emphasis will be placed on Inuit of Nunavut Territory, and how Inuit experience and respond to a variety of factors shaping life in the north. Subjects such as climate change, global investment in Arctic resources, and tourism will be examined alongside issues of food security, political rights, intergenerational knowledge transmission and more. Through discussions of these, we will gain understandings of how global dynamics of a changing Arctic affect Inuit who live there. Readings will include subjects in critical development, Indigenous studies, settler colonialism, and Arctic geography and history. Course materials will also draw from a variety of film and digital media from Inuit filmmakers and storytellers.

Prerequisite: Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

Instructor:  Mark Stoller

DEVS 878 Writing Intensities: Sense, Affect, Relationality (Winter)

This course is focused on the critique of writing’s unmarked settler colonial, heteronormative, ableist, and white supremacist structures, as well as alternatives to these. We will concern ourselves with “alternative” forms of writing and examine concerns about their supposed “alternative” status, as forms that are other to unmarked normative legitimacies of academic writing. We will address the scare / sneer placed around “alternatives” – of the written marks that signal our performative distance from the general and provisional. We will carve out provisional and speculative spaces that allow us to speak otherwise about sensory and affective relations between states, objects, and subjects.

We will experiment with forms of writing proximity and intimacy that underwrite our concern and other affective experience from our individual positionalities. We will find ways to express these experiences, speak of them, sound them, move through and around them, and to re-envision them. At the same time, we will not be concerned at all, abandoning what Eve Sedgewick has called “paranoid” forms of concern, in order to embrace the wondrous, and “reparative” (Sedgewick). We will follow apposite, and sensory-formalist methodologies that do not abandon scholarly rigor, but instead it into relationship with the personal, poetic and performative.

Instructor:  Dylan Robinson

DEVS 890/3.0 Cuban Culture and Society (Winter and Spring)

DEVS graduate students have the opportunity to register for DEVS 306/DEVS 307 Cuban Culture and Society as a directed reading course (3.0 units). This course is designed to introduce students to Cuban society and culture. The course will focus especially on the period from the Cuban revolution (1959) to the present. Students will examine some of the main events and highlights of Cuban history, politics and culture in this era. This course meets intermittently in Winter term, and reconvenes for a week at the beginning for May, before the group travels to the final two-week session at the University of Havana. Graduate students who wish to take this course as a graduate credit will also meet occasionally with the instructor; the course readings can be tailored to specific interests.  

NOTES:

  • Students are expected to pay an ancillary fee for travel and accommodation while in Havana. Estimated cost $3,200.
  • Students must apply to take the course. Applications are available in the DEVS office.
  • Students are expected to attend a pre-departure orientation.
  • Costs and application deadlines will be posted on the DEVS website.
  • DEVS 890 is a 3-unit course and the graduate equivalent of DEVS 306/DEVS 307.

For more information see Global Development Studies department website: https://www.queensu.ca/devs/undergraduate-program/international-study-program-cuba See also Queen's Cuban Culture and Society course page on Facebook www.facebook.com/QueensCubanCultureAndSocietyCourse

DEVS 890/3.0  Directed Reading Course

Students whose proposed research lies outside the realm (thematic or regional) of regular course offerings may choose this option. In consultation with a willing supervisor, students must develop a unifying title, course description, and reading list of 2‐4 key texts for each of 5‐6 set topics leading toward an agreed upon set of assignments.  There is an expectation that a minimum of one substantive written assignment will be required.

DEVS 898/3.0  Master's Research Paper

Students will complete a library‐based major research project (MRP) of 50‐60 pages. The MRP will deal with a specific interdisciplinary question directly relevant to Global Development Studies, which may be thematic or theoretical in nature or focus on peoples or places generally associated with the Global South in the context of relations with the Global North.

PREREQUISITE: Permission of Graduate Chair in consultation with a willing faculty supervisor, plus completion of two mandatory and four elective DEVS or DEVS‐ eligible courses.

DEVS 899/3.0  Master's Thesis

Research leading to a dissertation of 75‐100 pages will usually involve the collection and analysis of primary data and be of publishable quality. Such data could include oral interviews, archival and other documentary sources, in some cases collected through field work.

PREREQUISITE: Permission of Graduate Chair in consultation with a willing faculty supervisor, plus completion of two mandatory and four elective DEVS or DEVS‐eligible courses.

DEVS 950/3.0  Professional Doctoral Seminar in Development Studies  (Fall/Winter:  Monthly Sessions)

Provides a forum to discuss practical, ethical and methodological issues in conducting development research, pedagogy, writing and professional development, including thesis preparation, publications, development pedagogy, conference presentations and grant applications. Monthly meetings; Fall-Winter.

This is a mandatory course for all PhD graduate students in Global Development Studies.