Department of Global Development Studies

DEPARTMENT OF

Global Development Studies

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2020 PhD Cohort

Hannah Ascough

Hannah Ascough (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor:  Marc Epprecht
Start:  September 2018
Email:  17ha10@queensu.ca

My research centers on storytelling as a tool for development. I am interested in how environmental charities in South Africa use the trope “living happily ever after” to sell their cause to potential donors. I look at how such marketing techniques impact women’s involvement in environmental initiatives, and the intersections between narrative structure, ecofeminism, degrowth, and feminist political ecology

Alina Dixon

Alina Dixon (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor:  Allison Goebel
Start:  September 2018
Email:  1ad1@queensu.ca

My research focuses on the knowledge politics of ‘peacebuilding’ as it pertains to youth. Specifically, I am interested in troubling the western, liberal traditions of the dominant peacebuilding lexicon by examining how peacebuilding knowledge is constructed and maintained, and what the implications of this are for youth-led, everyday peace efforts. With a geographic focus on East Africa I am ultimately looking to investigate how youth action is conceptualized in relation to the more general processes of ‘building peace’, what it means for ‘peacebuilding’ as a liberal, political project, and what a more youth-inclusive vision of peacebuilding could look like. I hope to unveil the extent to which ‘peacebuilding’ has ignored, suppressed, or misinterpreted the actions of young people. 

Janette Haase

Janette Haase (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Marcus Taylor
Start:  September 2020
Email:  21jth1@queensu.ca

I propose to explore the use of regenerative and no-till agriculture in Ontario and Quebec through research and interviews with farmers and government and non-governmental agencies involved in this work. I seek to better understand the motivations, challenges, and experiences of transitioning to this type of agriculture and the conditions for its successful adoption. Agriculture is an incredibly complex social practice, deeply rooted in local cultures but also highly manipulated by large corporate interests. Current research on alternative agriculture highlights themes of social and environ-mental justice, climate change, food sovereignty, inequality and the ownership of both knowledge and nature. I seek to learn more about debates over sustainable agriculture and rural development and apply them to current agricultural models and our (in)ability to realize meaningful food system transformation close to home.

Zilong Liao

Zilong Liao (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Susanne Soederberg
Start:  September 2020
Email:  20zl34@queensu.ca

Generally, I am interested in almost everything related to capitalism and modernity. Currently, my academic interest lies in the political economy of profit, which is also the focal point of my doctoral research. Due to the fact that the explanation of profit, a cornerstone around which the whole economic activities are built, is astonishingly overlooked by mainstream economics, it is meaningful to seriously delve into this subject. My research will draw on radical economics and institutionalism, seeking to demonstrate that profit is a category and phenomenon embedded with abundant social connotations far richer than what the equilibrium methodology can reveal. One important dimension of those social connotations is power. Power is a force that shapes social institutions. Institutions, in turn, dictate the specific expression and morphology of power. “Financial capitalism”, characterized by financial deregulation, dollar standard, unbridled monetary stimulus, etc., to a large extent, has altered the logic of profit/capital accumulation of “commodity capitalism”. My research attempts to disclose how power is wielded in this special institutional setting in favor of profiting. In a general sense, it echoes Marxism in understanding profit from a political perspective, contrasting the depoliticizing trend in mainstream economics. Yet it significantly differs from critical economics for it understands profit or the expression of power as constantly rheological in its content, which is paralleled with and influenced by the evolution of social institutions.

Brandon Pryce

Brandon Pryce (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Rebecca Hall
Start:  September 2018
Email:  11bp16@queensu.ca

I am working with the Yellowknife’s Dene First Nation (YKDFN) and Dr. Rebecca Hall on a project which examines economic futures in communities and environments post-extraction. I engage in policy focused research which is solution-driven and organized around community input and collaboration.

Maya Saryyeva

Maya Saryyeva (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Kyla Tienhaara
Start:  September 2019
Email:  19ms59@queensu.ca

I study governance frameworks surrounding sustainable finance, and in particular the transparency and effectiveness of green bond projects.

Jordan Stark

Jordan Stark (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: David McDonald
Start:  September 2019
Email:  19jds1@queensu.ca

Broadly, my research lies at the intersection of data, development, and the city. Using Cape Town as a case study, I ask how municipal governments in the global South can best stimulate and support open data ecosystems of data producers, innovators, and users. Relatedly, I ask who are the various actors that make up Cape Town’s open data ecosystem; why has the ecosystem developed in this way; and in what ways and for whom does the ecosystem produce benefits. In addition, I consider potential pathways toward what some scholars have termed ‘bi-directional open data’, a situation characterized by new forms of city-citizen data relations in which communities and governments co-produce new data to improve service delivery..

2020 MA (Thesis) Cohort

Matthew Dunbar

Matthew Dunbar (MA Candidate: Thesis Option)
Supervisor:  David McDonald
Start:  September 2019
Email:  13MD70@queensu.ca

I am studying the evolution of development finance within China's One Belt One Road initiatives, with a particular focus on growing financial ties between China and Africa.

Brigid Goulem

Brigid Goulem (MA Candidate: Thesis Option)
Supervisor:  Reena Kukreja
Start:  September 2019
Email:  14bakg@queensu.ca

My research is focused on access to healthcare for migrants and asylum seekers in Greece. I am interested in how state policy, and EU imposed austerity measures have shaped healthcare access for migrants in Greece. 

Tineke Kippers

Tineke Kippers (MA Candidate: Thesis Option)
Supervisor:  Karen Dubinsky
Start:  September 2018
Email:  18trk1@queensu.ca

My research interests centre around police work and it's connection to neoliberal economic governance. I am particularly interested in how this operates transnationally in the case of Canadian contributions to training the Haitian National Police and its subsequent effect on the culture of impunity in Haiti. Additionally, I am interested in how Haiti is viewed politically and culturally in the international community and why.

2020 MA Cohort

Claire Geneste

Claire Genest (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:  20cg9@queensu.ca

My main research interests are informed by the increasing inequalities that are created by the neocolonial agenda of the Global North. Thus far, I have focused my research on the pitfalls of microfinance as a neoliberal economic development strategy in the Global South, and alternatively, how grassroots microfinance frameworks are more successful with regards to localized poverty reduction strategies. My other main interest is how the asymmetrical North-South relationship impacts climate change mitigation, and how restrictive immigration policies pose a threat to the security of the increasing amount of international climate refugees.

Bessie Hodder Olivera

Bessie Hodder Olivera (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:  15BHHO@queensu.ca

My research and plan will focus on social justice issues within migration, which allows me to explore issues and controversies in the field in the global North and the global South. Within my research I can examine the negative consequences of the securitization of boarders on marginalized communities and identify necessary changes in policy analysis to address migration concerns. Having the ability to be guided by resourceful professors will allow me to further address how institutionalized systems have defined citizenship rights and how these systems have created the management and regulation of people. I would like to explore how the criminalization of border crossings create further social issues within communities and isolates migrants from social integration..

Avanthi Jayasuriya

Avanthi Jayasuriya (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:  20anj2@queensu.ca

My research focuses on exploring the cultural impacts of economic policies on women. Specifically, I hope to examine how the degree of gender sensitivity of fiscal policies in developing nations has an impact on cultural identities and rights of women belonging to vulnerable or marginalized groups.

Muhammad Khan

Khan, Muhammad (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:  19MK47@queensu.ca

I am a photographer and my research interests are surrounding climate change and its effect on the social movements in the middle east. My undergrad research was based around middle eastern social and cultural politics and I hope to continue that by researching how climate change is effecting those movements.

Kylie McNeil

Kylie McNeil (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:  15KTM1@queensu.ca

In my undergraduate degree I found myself applying and receiving an accepted to the most exciting program, Global Development Studies. Global Development studies was the perfect department for me as it aligns with my interests in research and interrogates global and local phenomenon through a critical global economy approach. In my Undergraduate degree, I took a range of exciting courses that explored many exciting areas of research including business and development, global risk management, sustainable development, and urbanization. I was fortunate enough to complete my Honours Thesis taking a critical look into housing and the emergence of tent cities under the supervision of Dr. Susanne Soederberg. As a Queen’s undergrad Alumni, I am thrilled to be continuing my studies in global political economy at Queens for this upcoming school year

Ana Mejicano Greenberg

Ana Mejicano Greenberg (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email: 13AVMG@queensu.ca

Broadly speaking, I am interested in carrying out research that unpacks and explores the ways in which current migratory patterns challenge Western 'development' policies and narratives of prosperity.

Given my own immigration journey as a Central American woman in Canada, I am particularly interested in research centered around Central American and Mexican 'illegal/irregular' immigrant experiences in Canada at the intersections of gender and class. My intent is to further to understand how current migratory journeys affect livelihoods at every step of the process; and how they (re)shape migrant's economic and cultural relationships with their 'old' and 'new' nation states.

Carleigh Milburn

Carleigh Milburn (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:  14ccm6@queensu.ca

In 2017, I created Modern Métis Woman Inc. MMW is a non-for-profit registered charity. MMW provides post-secondary scholarships to self-identifying Aboriginal Women. MMW also provides art scholarships to Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal artists.

Metis Women in Canada have endured historical hardships and systemic racism. Through a lack of Aboriginal Education, colonial powers often misrepresent Métis Women’s importance. Métis women’s art can be impactful within the educational sector as it provides pathways toward challenging the colonial patriarchy and dismantles power structures within Canada. My research looks at the impactful learning opportunities that are represented through the breakdown of primary images produced by Métis Women. Thus, reflecting three questions. First, how can western-colonial patriarchies understand the important role of Métis Women and their art in a Canadian context? Secondly, how can stereotypes proposed by colonial powers be changed to initiate a power-shift toward Métis Women to reclaim their identity, and culture? And thirdly; How does Métis Women’s art contribute to land, body, and spirit? These ideas will be examined through a radical exploration of community, and Indigenous feminist theory..

Ethan Mitchell

Ethan Mitchell (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:  15ERAM@queensu.ca

I am mainly interested in researching egalitarian public-sector development in both North and South. This entails comparative analyses of different economic models across jurisdictions, but also how asymmetries of power and wealth have shaped the relationship between egalitarian development in Northern and Southern countries, including understanding the extent to which egalitarianism has succeeded in the North by sacrificing its counterpart movements in the South. A major goal of this research would be to better understand international policy solutions that can promote democratic and egalitarian development in the South, strip away layers of economic exploitation, and work toward an equitable and prosperous global system that better meets the material and psychological needs of citizens within Northern and Southern countries.

Avanthi Jayasuriya

Madalyn Neilsen (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:   20mjpn@queensu.ca

My research interests focus on areas of agriculture in the Global South regarding sustainable practices, rural development and livelihoods, agrarian change and food sovereignty, all intersecting to comprise the global agriculture sector. I completed a research project in Ethiopia during my undergraduate degree focusing on how livestock production can influence small-scale farmers in the Global South. I am interested in conducting further research concerning how agriculture affects peasants/pastoralists in the Global South, and how sustainable farming practices such as climate-smart agriculture can be implemented to benefit humans, animals and the environment while providing low inputs and high outputs to producers.

Sinead O'Hara

Sinead O'Hara (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:  15skoh@queensu.ca

I am passionate about decolonizing peacebuilding practices, facilitating reconciliation, and promoting female empowerment. I plan to research the weaponization of gendered violence in colonization and war, and I hope to contribute to a peacebuilding practice that prioritizes the healing of survivors by drawing from anti-colonial and anti-racist feminist frameworks. In my work, I intend to emphasize the need to develop culturally appropriate and relevant programs, as that is essential to effective peacebuilding and development. Additionally, I am interested in researching radicalization and recruitment, social movements, stigma of mental health, and the differing roles NGOs and governments have in international development.

Kenna Panikkar

Kenna Panikkar (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:   20kmp1@queensu.ca

My research focuses on barriers that women and girls may face when looking to obtain adequate sexual health education and access to sexual health resources.  Such barriers can include a nations inability to separate religion from state policies, gender roles and expectations of women and girls within a society, and/or socio-cultural attitudes that are had about women and their personal sexual health.

Jessica Phillips

Jessica Phillips (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:   15JCP3@queensu.ca

I am interested in researching migration as it is a global process that affects the lives of so many individuals. I am interested not only in specifically researching why individuals choose to migrate, but also the challenges they face throughout their journey as well as once they reach their destination. Similarly, recent events have caused an influx of individuals to be in such dangerous situations that they are forced to migrate and seek refugee status in another country. Hearing about the conditions of refugee camps around the world is truly heartbreaking. I would love the opportunity to research not only the causes of the existing refugee crisis, but also the positions of countries in the Global North.

Another key research interest of mine is looking at the relationship between society and the environment. Climate change and the decreasing biodiversity of our planet is becoming a growing concern. While I think looking towards green technology is step in the right direction, I also think it is important to consider how politics interacts with the environment. Perhaps one of the solutions to global warming could lie within policy change.

Kabir Shahani

Kabir Shahani (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:  16KS10@queensu.ca

My research interest includes the study of communities directly impacted/displaced by anthropogenic climate change events, with an increased focus on small island nations.

Tianna Tischbein

Tianna Tischbein (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:  20TAT@queensu.ca

My research interests are specifically focused on the current climate change crisis being experienced around the world, focusing on understanding the vulnerabilities and inequalities occurring in developing countries. I want to focus on different forms of development to create more sustainable approaches for infrastructure on both a micro and macro scale. Overall, I want to deepen my understanding of the factors that further and hinder development in countries around the world and how these have led to the current climate change crisis. Especially the constraints being put not only on countries but communities around the world as a result of the rapid development in Westernized countries.

2019 MA (Thesis) Cohort

Ashley Clark

Ashley Clark, MA (2020)
Thesis Title:  Interrogating Resilience: Governing Disasters in Metro Manila Post-Typhoon Ondoy
Supervisor:  Susanne Soederberg
 

Oula Hreiche

Oula Hreiche (MA Candidate: Thesis Option)
Supervisor:  Susanne Soederberg
Start:  September 2018
Email:  18oh3@queensu.ca

 

Alex Mikell

Alex Mikell (MA Candidate: Thesis Option)
Supervisor:  Marcus Taylor
Start:  September 2018
Email:  13abm8@queensu.ca

My research focuses on identifying the role that wheat played as a tool for U.S. imperialism in post-WWII Japan. Specifically, I am looking at why wheat was successfully used to ensure dependency on the part of the Japanese government and its population to U.S. food provision, and what methods of diffusion were utilized to create the current food culture.

2019 MA Cohort

Nida Azad

Nida Azad (MA Candidate)

Supervisor:  Mark Hostetler
Second Reader:  Marcus Taylor
Start:  September 2018

Charlotte Akin

Charlotte Akin, MA (2020)

Supervisor:  Reena Kukreja
Second Reader:  Colleen Davison
MRP Title:  Protection & Punishment The Impacts of the Hotspot Approach on the Rights and Status of Unaccompanied Children in Greece.

 

Emily Edwards

Emily Edwards, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Colleen Davison
Second Reader:  Reena Kukreja
MRP Title:  The Neoliberal Market Relations of Global Commercial Surrogacy – A Postcolonial Analysis of Stateless Babies, Outsourced Wombs, and Conflicting Regulations

Jessica Gentile

Jessica Gentile, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Diana Cordoba
Second Reader:  Allison Goebel
MRP Title:  Not Worth a "Dam"  A Socio-Environmental Analysis of the Experience of Displace Women Along the Congo River

Rae Jardine

Rae Jardine, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Mark Hostetler
Second Reader:  Marc Epprecht
MRP Title:  "We shall Not Wait for Karamoja to develop".  A Critical Discourse Analysis

Ainsley Johnston

Ainsley Johnston, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Marcus Taylor
Second Reader:  David McDonald
MRP Title:  The Exploration of Racial Bias in the US Federal Responses to Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Maria

Alexandria Knipp

Alexandria Knipp, MA (2020)
Supervisors:  Rebecca Hall and Diana Cordoba
MRP Title:  LIFE IN A NATIONAL SACRIFICE ZONE: How the Settler-Colonial State Perpetuates Slow Violence Through Extraction in the Northwest Territories and Appalachian Kentucky

Kristen Ouimet

Kristan Ouimet, MA Candidate
Supervisor:  Diana Cordoba
Start Date:  September 2019

Michelle Awusu-Ansah

Michelle Owusu-Ansah, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Marc Epprecht
Second Reader:  Grace Adeniyi-Ogunyankin
MRP Title:  Unmasking the Ghanaian State Analysis of the Ghanaian state's performative nature in addressing domestic and sexual violence (DSV) against women and women's response to the state and DSV through activism

 Julianna Rapper

Julianna Rapper, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Elia Zureik
Second Reader:  Mark Hostetler
MRP Title:  Strategies of Occupation in Apartheid Israel

Shanaya Singh

Shanaya Singh, MA (2020)
Supervisors:  Marcus Taylor and Allison Goebel
MRP Title:  Assessing the Potential for Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy to Support Maasai Women’s Land Rights in Northern Tanzania

Camille Slack

Camille Slack, MA (2020)
Supervisors:  Marcus Taylor
Second Reader:  Scott Rutherford
MRP Title:  The Potential of Food Sovereignty to Inform the Policy Response to Climate Change in the Canadian Arctic

Prateek Sood

Prateek Sood, MA (2020)
Supervisors:  John Harriss and Marcus Taylor
MRP Title:  The Potential of Food Sovereignty to Inform the Policy Response to Climate Change in the Canadian Arctic