Department of Global Development Studies

DEPARTMENT OF

Global Development Studies

site header
Subscribe to RSS - News & Events

Queens National Scholar in Indigenous Studies Position: Applications due 9Dec2019

Departments of
Global Development Studies and
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
Queen’s National Scholar in Indigenous Studies
Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada

The Departments of Global Development Studies and Languages, Literatures and Cultures, in Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s University invite applications for a Queen’s National Scholar (QNS) position at the rank of Assistant Professor or Associate Professor in Indigenous Studies. We strongly encourage applicants with experience in land-based or language-based pedagogies and practices. The position will contribute to the expansion and consolidation of Indigenous Studies at Queen's University. This is a tenured or tenure-track position held jointly in the Departments of Global Development Studies (DEVS) and Languages, Literatures and Cultures (LLCU) with a preferred starting date of July 1, 2020. Further information on the Queen’s National Scholar Program can be found on the website of the Office of the Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic).

Candidates must have a PhD or equivalent degree completed at the start date of the appointment or have equivalent qualifications as an indigenous knowledge keeper and/or through teaching experience, in academic and other relevant (e.g. activist and community-based activities) settings. Candidates must provide evidence of an ability to work collaboratively in an interdisciplinary and student-centred environment. The main criteria for selection are demonstrated academic and teaching excellence. The successful candidate would be expected to teach one or more core courses in the Indigenous Studies curriculum such as DEVS 220: Introduction to Indigenous Studies.

The successful candidate will have demonstrated knowledge and experience in the histories, traditions and current trajectories of the Indigenous nations of Turtle Island, with preference given to candidates whose experience concerns the Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee or Mohawk peoples, and who are familiar with either Anishinaabemowin, Kanienskéha or Mohawk. In selecting a candidate, the committee will take into account relevant scholarly publications, public communications, and community-based activities. The successful candidate will have the ability to secure external research funding, as well as strong potential for outstanding teaching contributions at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and an on-going commitment to academic and pedagogical excellence in support of the department’s programs. The successful candidate will be expected to make contributions through service to the respective departments, the Faculty, the University, and the broader community. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

The Queen’s National Scholar Program requires that the successful candidate will provide a rich and rewarding learning experience to all their students, and will develop a research program that aligns with the University’s priorities. Information on teaching and research priorities at Queen’s may be found in the Queen’s Academic Plan, and the Queen’s Strategic Research Plan.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority.

In keeping with the objectives of the Preliminary Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force, we are especially interested in qualified Indigenous candidates. Indigenous candidates will be welcomed into an academic community, which includes:

  • Indigenous colleagues from multiple faculties;
  • Indigenous Committees and an Indigenous Student Centre (Four Directions Indigenous  Student Centre) welcoming Indigenous students and faculty members;
  • The Indigenous community of Tyendinaga near campus.

People from across Canada and around the world come to learn, teach and carry out research at Queen’s University. Faculty and their dependents are eligible for an extensive benefits package including prescription drug coverage, vision care, dental care, long term disability insurance, life insurance and access to the Employee and Family Assistance Program. You will also participate in a pension plan. Tuition assistance is available for qualifying employees, their spouses and dependent children.  Queen’s values families and is pleased to provide a ‘top up’ to government parental leave benefits for eligible employees on maternity/parental leave.  In addition, Queen’s provides partial reimbursement for eligible daycare expenses for employees with dependent children in daycare. Details are set out in the Queen’s-QUFA Collective Agreement. For more information on employee benefits, see Queen’s Human Resources.

To comply with federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information as to how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada. Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship; however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

A complete application consists of:

  • A cover letter (including one of the two statements regarding Canadian citizenship / permanent resident status specified in the previous paragraph);
  • A current Curriculum Vitae (including a list of publications, awards and grants received);
  • A statement of current and prospective research interests;
  • A statement of teaching interests and experience (including teaching philosophy, as well as teaching outlines and evaluations if available);
  • A statement of experience with, and commitment to, facilitation and promotion of equity, diversity, and inclusion; and
  • A sample of academic writing or other research and advocacy publications.

Long-listed candidates will be further requested to provide three letters of reference. 

The deadline for applications is December 9, 2019. Applicants are encouraged to send all documents in their application package electronically as PDFs to Barbra Lalonde at devsmngr@queensu.ca although hard copy applications may be submitted to:

Queen’s National Scholar in Indigenous Studies Committee
c/o Department of Global Development Studies
Mackintosh-Corry Hall B412
68 University Avenue
Queen’s University
Kingston, ON CANADA K7L 3N6

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Barbra Lalonde in The Department of Global Development Studies, at 613-533-6000, ext 77210 or by e-mail at devsmngr@queensu.ca

Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the University and the Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA), which is posted at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/collective-agreement and at http://www.qufa.ca

Appointments are subject to review and final approval by the Principal. Candidates holding an existing tenure-track or continuing-adjunct appointment at Queen’s will not be considered.

Click here to view the position advertisement in PDF format.

 

Queen's National Scholar in Development in Practice Position: Applications due 3Dec2019

Department of Global Development Studies
Queen’s National Scholar in Development in Practice
Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada

The Department of Global Development Studies (DEVS) at Queen’s University invites applications for a Queen’s National Scholar (QNS) position at the rank of Assistant Professor or Associate Professor in the field of ‘Development in Practice’. This is a tenured or tenure-track position with a preferred start date of July 1, 2020. Further information on the Queen’s National Scholar Program can be found on the website of the Office of the Vice-Principal (Research) at: http://queensu.ca/vpr/prizes-awards/queens-national-scholars.

We welcome applicants whose research examines the social and political dynamics of development projects as they unfold in practice. Areas of expertise would include the politics of knowledge and the practices of engagement, accommodation, and contestation that occur between implementing agencies and target populations. With strong experience working within or conducting research upon development projects, the successful candidate would have the ability to teach an undergraduate course on the practical elements of project design, implementation, and evaluation while also guiding students in the practices of reflexive cross-cultural exchange and cooperation. The successful candidate will assume responsibility for undergraduate and graduate courses in this field while also contributing to the established curriculum in the department. While not a requirement, a geographic focus on North Africa, the Middle East, Central or Southeast Asia would be considered an asset.

Candidates must have a PhD or equivalent degree completed at the start date of the appointment. The main criteria for selection are academic and teaching excellence. The successful candidate will provide evidence of high quality scholarly output that demonstrates potential for independent research leading to peer assessed publications and the securing of external research funding, as well as strong potential for outstanding teaching contributions at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and an ongoing commitment to academic and pedagogical excellence in support of the department’s programs. Candidates must provide evidence of an ability to work collaboratively in an interdisciplinary and student-centred environment. The successful candidate will also be expected to make contributions through service to the department, the Faculty, the University, and/or the broader community. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. 

People from across Canada and around the world come to learn, teach and carry out research at Queen’s University. Faculty and their dependents are eligible for an extensive benefits package including prescription drug coverage, vision care, dental care, long term disability insurance, life insurance and access to the Employee and Family Assistance Program. You will also participate in a pension plan. Tuition assistance is available for qualifying employees, their spouses and dependent children.  Queen’s values families and is pleased to provide a ‘top up’ to government parental leave benefits for eligible employees on maternity/parental leave.  In addition, Queen’s provides partial reimbursement for eligible daycare expenses for employees with dependent children in daycare. Details are set out in the Queen’s-QUFA Collective Agreement. For more information on employee benefits, see Queen’s Human Resources.

Additional information about Queen’s University can be found on the Faculty Recruitment and Support website. The University is situated on the traditional territories of the Haudenosaunee and Anishnaabe, in historic Kingston on the shores of Lake Ontario. Kingston’s residents enjoy an outstanding quality of life with a wide range of cultural, recreational, and creative opportunities. Visit Inclusive Queen’s for information on equity, diversity and inclusion resources and initiatives.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons.  All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority.

To comply with federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information as to how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada.  Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship; however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

In addition, the impact of certain circumstances that may legitimately affect a nominee’s record of research achievement will be given careful consideration when assessing the nominee’s research productivity. Candidates are encouraged to provide any relevant information about their experience and/or career interruptions.

A complete application consists of:

  • A cover letter (including one of the two statements regarding Canadian citizenship / permanent resident status specified in the previous paragraph);
  • A current Curriculum Vitae (including a list of publications, awards and grants received);
  • A statement of current and prospective research interests;
  • A statement of teaching interests and experience (including teaching philosophy, as well as teaching outlines and evaluations if available);
  • A statement of experience with, and commitment to, facilitation and promotion of equity, diversity, and inclusion; and,
  • A sample of academic writing or other research and advocacy publications.

Short-listed candidates will be further requested to provide three letters of reference.

The deadline for applications is December 3, 2019. Applicants are encouraged to send all documents in their application package electronically as PDFs to Barbra Lalonde at devsmngr@queensu.ca although hard copy applications may be submitted to:

Queen’s National Scholar in Development and Practice Appointments Committee
c/o Department of Global Development Studies
Mackintosh-Corry Hall B412
68 University Avenue
Queen’s University
Kingston, Ontario CANADA K7L 3N9

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs.  If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Barbra Lalonde in the Department of Global Development Studies, 68 University Avenue, B413 Mackintosh-Corry Hall, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N9 Telephone 613-533-6000, extension 77210

Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the University and the Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA), which is posted at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/col... and at http://www.qufa.ca. 

Appointments are subject to review and final approval by the Principal. Candidates holding an existing tenure-track or continuing-adjunct appointment at Queen’s will not be considered.

Click here to view the position posting in PDF format.

DEVS 305: Cuban Society and Culture Information Session October 3, 2020 at 5:30 PM in Dunning 14

Want to challenge your perceptions, stereotypes and fantasies about Cuba,
the Caribbean, and Latin America?   Take a Queen’s Course in Havana!

 


DEVS 305 Student Group in Havana

Global Development Studies 305: Cuban Culture and Society is an interdisciplinary 6.0 unit course. It is open to all qualified students and counts towards degree requirements in the departments of: Film and Media, Sociology, Language Literatures and Culture, Gender Studies, and History.

The Queen’s portion of the course begins January 9, 2020. After exams there is a pre-departure sessions on campus from April 27 to May 1, 2020, then we leave for two weeks in Havana, hosted by the University of Havana from May 3 to May 17, 2020.

Fourth year students can take this course and graduate Spring 2020

Information Session:

For further information attend the Information Session on Thursday October 3, 2019 at 5:30 PM in Dunning Hall, Room 14

Additional information and the application form can be found at https://www.queensu.ca/devs/undergraduate-program/international-study-program-cuba or contact the DEVS office via email at devs.student@queensu.ca

Application Deadlines:

Applications are to be submitted to the DEVS main office located in room B412 of Mackintosh-Corry Hall no later than 4:00 PM on Wednesday October 16, 2019. Applicants will be notified by October 25, 2019 of the decision.

 

 

 

DEVS hosts visitors from the University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg, South Africa)

DEVS welcomes visitors from the University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg, South Africa)

 

Visitors from WITS University
University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) visits Queen's University

On the 20th of September 2019, DEVS hosted a team of seven administrators from the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), Johannesburg, who are researching best practices for graduate-level education.

Wits is one of the premier universities in Africa, and is seeking to develop closer ties to Queen's University. Says team leader Prof. Robert Muponde, Wits Director of Postgraduate Affairs, "I hope to be back soon to learn more about your amazing Wellness Centre, the International Centre, DEVS, CUST and other excellent programs. I felt we learned a lot during our lightning visit, and also that people here are keen to learn from our experiences as well."

DEVS also hosted Dr. Mucha Musemwa, Head of the School of Social Sciences at Wits. Dr. Musemwa gave lectures, the SNID seminar, and met with a range of students, faculty, and administrators during his week on campus. The hope is to lay the foundation for a broad and sustainable partnership between Queen’s and one of Africa’s leading universities as it transitions to a research-intensive, graduate-focused institution. Wits will be hosting the first cohort of Queen’s students for a Semester Abroad this coming summer (Johannesburg’s winter!).

 

 

Indigenous Resurgence and Development Tenure Track Position: Applications due 9Sept2019

Department of Global Development Studies, Queen’s University
Tenure-Track Position
Indigenous Resurgence and Development

The Department of Global Development Studies (DEVS) invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the field of Indigenous Resurgence and Development. We welcome applicants addressing any geographical region who examine the relationships between Indigenous social and political movements and the discourses and practices of development. Candidate specialisations might include Indigenous land, food and resource management; domestic and international Indigenous laws and politics; and local and global processes of colonization and decolonization. Experience in Indigenous knowledges and approaches to development would be considered an asset.

Candidates must have a PhD or equivalent degree completed at the start date of the appointment. The main criteria for selection are research and teaching excellence. Candidates’ community involvement, community knowledge production, traditional knowledge, and lived experience would be included in this assessment. The successful candidate will provide evidence of strong potential for outstanding teaching contributions at the undergraduate and graduate levels.  They will be expected to work collaboratively with other members in the department in the area of curriculum design. Methodological innovation and comfort with current and emergent teaching technologies will also be assets.

The successful candidate will provide evidence of high quality scholarly output that demonstrates potential for independent research moving beyond a dissertation and leading to peer-assessed publications. Candidates must provide evidence of strong communicative and interpersonal skills combined with a flexible attitude and ability to work in an interdisciplinary, collaborative environment. The successful candidate will also be expected to make substantive contributions through service to the department, to the Faculty, to the University, and/or to the broader community. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen's is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. DEVS is enriched intellectually, socially and culturally by the presence and participation of people from diverse educational backgrounds, including from the Global South. 

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and Permanent Residents of Canada will be given priority. 

To comply with Federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information about how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada. Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship; however, all applications must include one of the following statements:

  • “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR,
  • “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”.

Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

A complete application consists of: 

  • a cover letter (including one of the two statements regarding Canadian citizenship / permanent resident status specified in the previous paragraph); 
  • a current Curriculum Vitae (including a list of publications); 
  • a sample of academic writing;
  • a statement of research interests; and
  • a teaching dossier or statement of teaching interests and experience (including teaching outlines and evaluations if available). 

Short-listed candidates will be further requested to provide three letters of reference. 

The deadline for applications is 11:59 PM EST on September 9, 2019.

Applications should be addressed to Dr. Marcus Taylor, Department Head, Global Development Studies.  We encourage applicants to send all documents in their application packages electronically (either as PDFs or MS Word files) to Barbra Lalonde at devsmanager@queensu.ca, although hard copy applications may be submitted to:

Department of Global Development Studies
Mackintosh-Corry Hall, B401, Queen’s University
68 University Avenue
Kingston, Ontario CANADA K7L 3N6
Attn:  Barbra Lalonde, Department Manager
Email:  devsmanager@queensu.ca (preferred)

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Barbra Lalonde at 613-533-6000 x 77210 or via email at devsmanager@queensu.ca.

Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the University and the Queen’s University Faculty  Association (QUFA), which is posted at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/col... at http://www.qufa.ca.

Click here to view the position posting in PDF format.

Botswana recognizes LGBTQ rights, leading the way in southern Africa (Article by Dr. Marc Epprecht, Published in The Conversation )

Botswana recognizes LGBTQ rights, leading the way in southern Africa


Activists celebrate outside the High Court in Gaborone, Botswana on June 11, 2019. Botswana became the latest country to decriminalize gay sex. (AP Photo)

Marc Epprecht, Queen's University, Ontario

Botswana is a small country by population, but a big one by its role in the history of multi-party democracy and human rights in southern Africa. Botswana, although it did not sacrifice as much as many of the other frontline states, just got bigger. Last month, its High Court determined that the law that criminalized “carnal knowledge of any person against the order of nature” was discriminatory and therefore unconstitutional.

Botswana now joins a select group of African countries that recognizes the rights and dignity of its sexual minorities.

This ruling is a tremendous victory for all LGBTQ people in Botswana. The path is now open to liberate LGBTQ people from fear of arrest and harassment by the police, of shaming and outing by health-care professionals and of extortion by ex-lovers, among other presently common experiences.


Read more: Botswana court ruling is a ray of hope for LGBT people across Africa


It has the potential to liberate LGBTQ people psychologically from the stigma of being criminalized. That stigma often drove men who have sex with men (MSM) to hide their sexuality behind a façade of heterosexual relationships. This ruling provides some hope for a safer and greater dignity as the need to hide from the law is removed.

The ruling has significance far beyond Botswana’s borders.

Botswana is widely respected

Although human rights monitors in South Africa have reported failures by security forces to uphold rights of lesbians and transgender men, it was the first country in the world to enshrine freedom from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in its national constitution. It was also one of the first governments in the world to recognize full equality of marriage for sexual and gender minorities.

While Cape Town markets itself as “Africa’s gay capital,” South Africa has been cautious to avoid the accusation of exporting its approach to human rights. Some consider the South African laws an idiosyncrasy linked to white settler colonialism.

But Botswana was never a colony. It was a protectorate in which core aspects of traditional authority and culture were preserved and almost no white settlement was allowed. Botswana, Angola, Mozambique and Zimbabwe are widely respected throughout Africa for their role in the liberation of South Africa from white supremacy.

The Botswana ruling may slightly embolden South African’s Minister of International Affairs. Now that South Africa is just one of four nations in the region to have decriminalized consenting homosexual acts, it may become more forthright in speaking out against gross violations of the human rights of sexual and gender minorities in other African countries.


In this May 2010 photo, women protest against a sentence of 14 years in prison, with hard labour, given to two men in Malawi under Malawi’s anti-gay legislation, in the city of Cape Town, South Africa, (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)

Urbanized and progressive

The common assumption is that traditional culture in Botswana is inimical to gay rights. That assumption is mistaken.

Botswana is one of the most urbanized countries on the continent (more so than South Africa, and not much behind Switzerland). LEGABIBO (Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals of Botswana, whose CEO testified as a friend of the court in this case), is one of the oldest sexual minority rights associations on the continent outside of South Africa.

While Sotho-Tswana remain strong and integral to national identity, traditional culture is actually more open than commonly assumed. The concept of batho (often translated as “African humanism”) is perhaps relevant to that understanding. How can you be a human being with dignity and meaning if you do not respect your fellow humans — alive, yet-born and ancestral — as equally endowed with dignity and humanness, notwithstanding their (and our own) many differences and flaws? The current president appears to share the same view.

Former president Festus Mogae hinted at this cultural attribute a few years ago when he admitted that, as president, he quietly ordered the police not to enforce the-then law. Why enforce something that humiliates our family members and ourselves, especially when that law is a relic of a colonial, racist system?


Read more: Botswana joins list of African countries reviewing gay rights


Judicial independence

Botswana has a long and proud tradition of judicial independence and of the courts taking a stand against the misuse of power.

The current ruling is actually the culmination of an incremental process of legal victories over the past decade, including winning the rights to non-discrimination in places of employment, change gender identity on official documents and form civil society associations. This process of respect for the rule of law is powerful testimony to the strength of Botswana’s democratic institutions.

But democracy, of course, does not always favour progressive change. Botswana’s Attorney General has already filed an appeal against the new ruling. Although, without providing a strong rationale and running counter to the President’s earlier sympathetic statements toward sexual minorities, it is difficult to see the appeal as much more than a performance of rectitude.


Activists celebrate inside the High Court in Gaborone on June 11, 2019 after Botswana became the latest country to recognize LGBTQ human rights. (AP Photo)

Several African countries have used appeals to democracy to cement majoritarian cultural preference into their constitutions precisely to block sexual minority rights. This was the main argument in the Kenya case, where decriminalization of sodomy theoretically opened the door to a challenge on the constitutional definition of marriage as heterosexual.

In Botswana, a public health crisis clarified that democracy means more than majority preference. Botswana has one of the highest rates of HIV/AIDS prevalence in the world, roughly 100 times that of Canada’s. Botswana was among the first governments on the continent to recognize the imperative of a holistic, science-based approach to fighting the pandemic.

Since men who have sex with men (MSM) and trans people have disproportionately high rates of HIV , it only makes sense to help that “key population” protect itself (and hence the non-key majority, who can now be equipped with honest sexuality education). Rationally, and compassionately, who can oppose this logic on the most basic public health grounds?

Bravo, Botswana, for saying so loudly and clearly that they cannot.

[ You’re smart and curious about the world. So are The Conversation’s authors and editors. You can read us daily by subscribing to our newsletter. ]

The Conversation

Marc Epprecht, Professor of Global Development Studies, Queen's University, Ontario

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

DEVS Teaching Assistant Positions 2019-2020 Apply by 29July2019

Teaching Assistantship Vacancies – Department of Global Development Studies

The Department of Global Development Studies has Teaching Assistantships available in the following courses for 2019-2020 academic year.  Please review the application process listed.  Applications will be reviewed starting on July 29, 2019:

DEVS 100/6.0     Canada and the "Third World" – Fall Term and Winter Term 

Instructors: David McDonald (fall) and Karen Dubinsky (winter)  

Introduces basic theoretical concepts of development studies, the history of global inequality, and short histories of alternative development strategies. Case studies of Canada’s ties to the so-called third world will include missionaries, military, business, and aid. Canadian colonialism over First Nations peoples will introduce basic issues in Aboriginal Studies.

DEVS 220/3.0     Aboriginal Studies – Fall Term

Instructor: Rebecca Hall

DEVS 220 will help you develop a foundation for further inquiries into Aboriginal Studies. Students will develop a general knowledge of North American Indigenaity with a focus on Aboriginal peoples in Canada. This course will prepare the student to evaluate written and oral historical/cultural knowledge in regard to Aboriginal people and issues. The student will develop strategies for analyzing primary sources as well as acquire a basic knowledge of secondary resources. Students will challenge pre-conceived ideas acquired as citizens of a colonial culture. Course lectures and material will be presented from an Aboriginal perspective. The instructor will use both Indigenous and Western pedagogies.

DEVS 221/3.0     Topics in Aboriginal Studies – Winter Term

Instructor: Ian Fanning

Students will develop a general knowledge of North American Indigenaity with a focus on Aboriginal peoples in Canada. This course will prepare the student to evaluate written and oral historical/cultural knowledge in regard to Aboriginal people and issues.

DEVS 221/3.0     Topics in Aboriginal Studies – Winter Term ONLINE

Instructor: Ian Fanning

Students will develop a general knowledge of North American Indigenaity with a focus on Aboriginal peoples in Canada. This course will prepare the student to evaluate written and oral historical/cultural knowledge in regard to Aboriginal people and issues.

Position Details

Hours:  75 to 130, depending on enrollment

DEVS 230/3.0     The Global Political Economy of Development – Fall Term

Instructor: Susanne Soederberg

This course introduces students to important debates, concepts and themes in global development. Using a political economy perspective, we examine how different types of power relations are formed around the production, distribution and consumption of goods across local, national and international settings. We also examine how these power relations structure the institutions, processes and outcomes of ‘global development’.  The course proceeds historically starting with an examination of the ways in which post-colonial countries were integrated into the world economy in the decades following the Second World War. Subsequently, we use this as a basis to examine more contemporary issues including good governance, free trade, corporate social responsibility, and the role of NGOs.

DEVS 230/3.0     The Global Political Economy of Development – Winter Term ONLINE

Instructor: Mark Hostetler

This course introduces students to important debates, concepts and themes in global development. Using a political economy perspective, we examine how different types of power relations are formed around the production, distribution and consumption of goods across local, national and international settings. We also examine how these power relations structure the institutions, processes and outcomes of ‘global development’.  The course proceeds historically starting with an examination of the ways in which post-colonial countries were integrated into the world economy in the decades following the Second World War. Subsequently, we use this as a basis to examine more contemporary issues including good governance, free trade, corporate social responsibility, and the role of NGOs.

Position Details

Hours:  75 to 130, depending on enrollment

DEVS 240/3.0     Culture and Development – Winter Term

Instructor: Ayca Tomac

Provides students with a broad overview of debates relating to development and culture, including issues of religion, music, sport, art and literature, and how these interact with economic policy and political change.

DEVS 250/3.0     Global Environmental Transformations – Fall Term

Instructor: Marcus Taylor

Examines  the  relationship  between  development  and  environmental  change  by  introducing  social  science perspectives  on  themes  including energy,  agriculture,  climate,  urbanisation  and  water.  With a focus on combining macro-¬‐ and micro-¬‐ analysis, the course reflects on the meaning of development in an era of global environmental transformation.

DEVS 260/3.0     Globalization Gender and Development – Winter Term

Instructor: Reena Kukreja
DEVS 260 Globalization, Gender, and Development is designed for those interested in undertaking a critical analysis of the gendered impact of the globalization process and development policies with a focus on women in the Global South.

DEVS 260/3.0     Globalization Gender and Development – Fall Term ONLINE

Instructor: Ayca Tomac
DEVS 260 Globalization, Gender, and Development is designed for those interested in undertaking a critical analysis of the gendered impact of the globalization process and development policies with a focus on women in the Global South.

Position Details

Hours:  75 to 130, depending on enrollment

DEVS 280/3.0     Global Engagement – Fall Term ONLINE

Instructor:  Mark Hostetler
This course explores current thinking around the motivations for, and ethical implications of, working with communities on issues of social justice, inequality, and sustainable development. Students will engage in self-reflexive practices and work collaboratively to create tools and action plans for ethical global engagement in the future.

Position Details

Hours:  75 to 130, depending on enrollment

DEVS 293/3.0     Practical Issues in International Development/Winter Term

Instructor:  Robert Aucoin

In addition to the day to day challenges like communications concerns, safety issues, health issues, what are the practical skills a practitioner of international development should possess? This course will explore practical issues in international development with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. Examples will be drawn from lived-experiences working and living in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America and will use case studies, gaming simulations and lectures to explore applied topics in international development. Topics include: Conducting Needs Assessment, Workshop/Training Development, Monitoring and Evaluation with a focus on measurement, formative evaluation and theory of change, an introduction to Program Planning, Intercultural Communications and Competence, Leadership, Program Funding including public/private partnerships and Entrepreneurialism

Prerequisite Level 2 or above and registration in any DEVS plan or permission of the department

DEVS 300/3.0     Cross-Cultural Research Methods – Winter Term

Instructor: Mark Hostetler

A study of practical issues related to development research and program evaluation in development settings, using a case-study approach. Topics include information retrieval, cross-cultural research methods, basic data analysis, and results-based project evaluation.

DEVS 340/3.0     Theories of Development – Fall Term

Instructor: Paritosh Kumar

Provides students with an overview of theories that underpin the development enterprise, and critiques of development, through the use of primary texts and critical appraisals.

DEVS 352/3.0     Technology and Development – Winter Term

Instructor: Mark Hostetler

An introduction to the socio-economic, cultural and political factors surrounding technology and its relationship to the development process in both advanced industrial societies and developing nations. Student project groups will focus on particular realms of technology in development and the interaction of politics and policy with technological choice and design, including appropriate, intermediate and sustainable technologies.

DEVS 353/3.0     Business and Development – Winter Term

Instructor: Susanne Soederberg

Over the past several decades, business – particularly large multinational corporations - have come to play an increasingly dominant role in global development. This course will interrogate the structures, processes and practices employed by corporations as they forge new partnerships with states, inter-governmental organizations (e.g., the United Nations), non-governmental organizations. In so doing, we will use lectures, tutorials and case studies to learn about the anatomy of corporate power (legal structure, governance and decision making processes) and how this power is brokered across the globe through themes such as: divestment campaigns, microcredit, and shelter loans for slum dwellers, corporate philanthropy, disaster management, the sustainable development goals, and corporate social responsibility.

DEVS 354/3.0     Cities and Urbanization in the South– Fall Term

Instructor: David McDonald

This course examines cities and urbanization in countries in the South, looking at similarities and differences between and across regions, and the extent to which these cities connect (or not) with urban areas in the Nort

DEVS 356/3.0     The Political Economy of Resource Extraction – Winter Term

Instructor:  Rebecca Hall

This course will analyze the political economy of resource extraction, with a focus on Canadian resource extraction, domestically and globally. From early settler colonialism to the present-day, resource extraction has played a central role in the development of Canadian politics, economics, and identity. Today, the majority of the world’s mining companies are Canadian.

Beyond Canada, resource extraction plays a central role in global processes of production. At present, modes of resource extraction are unsustainable, and threaten the well being of lands and communities across the globe. Extractive projects have been linked to colonial, racial and gender violence, and have been met with resistance by local groups – especially Indigenous groups – around the globe. This begs the question: what has made resource extraction what it is today, and how can we imagine alternative extractive futures?

The course begins with the question: “what counts as extraction?” Students will analyze different understandings of resource extraction; its role in economies and livelihoods; and its history (including the relationship between resource extraction and colonialism, imperialism, and migration). Next, students will examine contemporary issues in resource extraction, including gender and violence; Indigeneity and land-rights; and “responsible development”. The final section of the course will look to the future, assessing the boundaries of resource extraction (including extraction of data and the body); and, exploring alternative approaches and new possibilities in resource management and extraction.

DEVS 361/3.0     Policy Advocacy and Field Specific Skills – Winter Term ONLINE

Instructor: Mark Hostetler and Scott Rutherford
The course prepares students for fieldwork in global development. It connects theory with practice through in-depth, skillsbased modules on economic literacy, results-based management (RBM), and policy advocacy. Students will apply core concepts and best practices to effective proposal writing, project management, and policy advocacy.

Position Details

Hours:  75 to 130, depending on enrollment

DEVS 363/3.0     Contemporary Southern Africa: Development Trends and Challenges – Fall Term

Instructor:  Marc Epprecht
This course first provides the historical and regional context necessary to understand urban southern Africa’s contemporary struggles, then examines strategies to address key development challenges and how they may be creating opportunities for new ways of thinking about citizenship in South Africa and the Global South more generally.

DEVS 393/3.0     Migration, Refugees, and Development – Winter Term

Instructor: Reena Kukreja 

In this course, students will examine forced and voluntary migration in the context of contemporary global, regional, and national political and economic changes. Here, they will undertake an investigation of the relationship between globalization, neoliberalism-induced displacements, climate change, conflict, and migration, with particular emphasis on the differential experiences of the migrants and displaced people around the world. They will learn about legal definitions and classifications of migrant populations including: asylum seekers, stateless populations, irregular migrant, economic migrant, refugees, and internally displaced persons (IDPs). The students will also analyse situations where people are forced to move for reasons of famine, poverty, environmental and development - induced displacement, war, or conflict. Underlying the analysis will be an intersectional approach that situates movements of people within matrixes of power such as gender, race, class, caste, ethnicity, location, and other social relations of differences. Lastly, state polices, and humanitarian responses will be studied in response to forced or voluntary movements of people.

DEVS 392/3.0:  Non-Governmental Organisations, Policy Making, and Development Fall Term

Instructor:  Diana Córdoba

Non-governmental organization (NGOs) have become key actors in the world of development influencing both the decision-making process and policy implementation. This course aims to provide students with basic knowledge and skills in preparation for work in the NGOs’ sector and a critical overview of the major issues involved in their interventions. The first part of the course introduces students to critical theories and debates on NGOs’ governance, state-society relationships and democracy. Special attention is given to the role and effectiveness of NGOs to influence the decision-making process and to impact policy implementation. The second part of the course focuses on NGOs’ managerial practices and knowledges and the challenges and constraints associated with their growing dependency on external funding. Thus, students explore aspects such as NGOs’ organisational management, legitimacy and accountability, the way these organisations facilitate capacity development, and NGOs future opportunities. Using a case-based approach, in the third part of the course students analyze the structures, missions and intervention approaches in a variety of international NGO areas such as agricultural development, poverty reduction, climate change adaptation and mitigation, women’s rights, and humanitarian relief. Prerequisite Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS plan.

DEVS 392/3.0:  Global Development and Social Movements Fall Term

Instructor:  M. Omar Faruque

This course offers students an interdisciplinary perspective on hyper-globalization and social movements in the Global South. Hyper-globalization has created enormous development challenges for many countries in the Global South. Bottom-up responses in the form of social movements, often dubbed ‘globalization-from-below,’ have emerged to contest the rules of hyper-globalization through social-justice oriented interventions. Using lecture materials, case studies, and relevant documentaries, this course dissects both phenomena to emphasize critical aspects of the development-social movement nexus in the era of hyper-globalization. It consists of two parts. Part 1 focuses on thematic issues of contemporary globalization and development. Part 2 looks at how various social movements in the Global South confront the challenges and offer alternative development and policy choices

PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS Plan, or permission of the Department.

DEVS 392-001/3.0:  Rethinking Project Design and Management Winter Term

Instructor:  Andrew Russell

15 years after the Paris Declaration on Development Effectiveness, many development projects are still delivered in a linear, top-down fashion, often in response to donor demands to “fit” within centrally-defined funding categories, results frameworks, and timeframes. Despite commitments made in Paris to strengthen developing country ownership, these projects are not always aligned with local priorities, placing undue burden on those receiving aid. In addition, it is increasingly evident that the government-led approach underpinning the Paris agenda is inadequate to achieve the ambitious 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Against this challenging setting, a variety of innovative methods for project design and management have emerged that seek to foster greater local ownership and relevance, increase flexibility to adapt to changes in the external context, and create alignment and linkages with other change processes at a systems level. This course will introduce students to some of these approaches, including human-centred design, innovation labs, agile, U-process, systems thinking, and participatory evaluation, as well as to innovative finance mechanisms such as social impact bonds and crowdfunding. Students will be provided with opportunities to test out these and other similar approaches in real-life situations.


TAships are filled according to Group Preferences set out in the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University and the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC 901 http://psac901.org/).

First Preference – Group A

Is for qualified graduate students registered as:

  • Students in a department or program in which the TAship will be offered; or
  • Students in an interdisciplinary program with TA budget resources,
  • and for whom the TAship has been granted as part of the funding commitment offered by Queen’s University.

Second Preference – Group B

Is for qualified graduate students registered as:

  • Students in a department or program in which the TAship will be offered; or
  • Students in an interdisciplinary program with TA budget resources, and
  • for whom the TAship will not form part of the funding commitment offered by Queen’s University; or there is currently no funding commitment provided by Queen’s University.                                

Third Preference – Group C

  • Is for qualified graduate students who have previously held a TAship or TFship for Queen’s University.

Fourth Preference – Group D

  • Is for qualified graduate students who have not met the criteria as set out above in Group A, B, or C.

APPLICATION PROCESS

To apply, please forward required information as outlined below to Barbra Lalonde, Department Manager (devsgrad@queensu.ca). 

Applications are being accepted immediately and positions will remain posted until they have been filled (no less than seven (7) calendar days from the date of this posting).  REview of applications will begin on July 29, 2019.

Group A Applicants

  • Please indicate course preference

Groups B, C and D Applicants

  • Please indicate
    • course preference
    • curriculum vitae outlining academic accomplishments and relevant experience
    • unofficial transcript

Click here to view the overview of TA opportunities in PDF format.

Pages