Department of Global Development Studies

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Global Development Studies

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Strategic Indifference: Understanding Responses to Migrant and Refugee Settlement in Mediterranean Host Countries


Date:  Monday February 4, 2019
Venue: Jeffrey Hall, Room 225
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:30 PM
Speaker: Kelsey Norman, University of British Columbia

Many countries are simultaneously countries of emigration, transit, and immigration. How do they manage these different roles? This presentation focuses on three states in the South and Eastern Mediterranean region—Egypt, Morocco and Turkey—which have seen increasing patterns of migrant and refugee settlement over the last several decades. Through data collected from more than 150 interviews across the three countries, I present a menu of policies from which states strategically select an appropriate strategy for addressing new patterns of migrant and refugee settlement. I also examine when and why countries switch from one policy to another, finding that states may pursue combinations of policies, or change policies over time, depending on perceived diplomatic or economic benefits. This can be due to the influence of neighboring states, domestic political pressures, or security concerns, as well as a host state’s relationship with the origin country of migrants or refugees. My research reframes host states in the Global South as strategic actors when it comes to migration policy, carefully selecting the policy most suitable to their domestic and foreign policy goals while also attempting to utilize as few state resources as possible. Finally, I show what different host state policy options mean for individual migrants and refugees who find themselves ‘stuck’ in countries thought to primarily be spaces of transit. I demonstrate that even in situations of informality and absent meaningful international protection, migrants and refugees find access to livelihoods and ways of sending their children to school, form communities, and engage in social and sometimes political activities.

Kelsey Norman

Kelsey Norman

Dr. Kelsey Norman is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Political Science and the Institute for European Studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada and an instructor at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver.

Dr. Noman's research examines Middle East and North African states as countries of migrant and refugee settlement and her dissertation was titled "Reluctant Reception: Understanding Host State Migration and Refugee Policies in Egypt, Morocco and Turkey."

 

 

 

Graduate Student Positions Available: Green Keynesianism Research Project (Applications due 1Feb2019)


The Global Financial Crisis brought about a ‘Keynesian moment’ with a return to more active government intervention in the economy in many countries. Some actors endeavored to make it a ‘Green Keynesian moment’ by pushing governments to invest fiscal stimulus in climate change mitigation measures. Although the opportunity to tackle the environmental and economic crises simultaneously was missed in this instance, Green Keynesianism as a potential policy framework merits further inquiry. This research program combines interdisciplinary theoretical insights and the experience of governments with ‘green stimulus’ to develop a robust version of Green Keynesianism that is equitable and respects planetary boundaries.

PhD position (commencing September 2019)

  • Student will enrol in either Environmental Studies or Global Development Studies
  • Student will conduct research on the role of the state in the transition to a ‘green economy’ or on global institutions that can either help or hinder Green Keynesianism (e.g. IMF, trade agreements, ILO)
  • The project is interdisciplinary – students with a background in politics, international relations, environmental policy, development studies or ecological economics are especially encouraged to apply
  • Position based at Queen’s University
  • Funding is available for student fieldwork
  • Guaranteed allowance (includes RA/TA positions): CAD 28,000/year for 4 years

MES or MA position (commencing September 2019)

  • Student will enrol in either Environmental Studies or Global Development Studies
  • Student will conduct research on the initiatives by subnational governments to facilitate the transition to a ‘green economy’ (e.g. Alberta coal phase-out, Michigan incentives for advanced battery industry)
  • The project is interdisciplinary – students with a background in politics, international relations, environmental policy, or ecological economics are encouraged to apply • Position based at Queen’s University
  • Funding is available for student fieldwork
  • Guaranteed allowance (includes RA/TA positions): CAD 20,000/year for 2 years

To apply:
Contact: Dr Kyla Tienhaara (kyla.tienhaara@queensu.ca)

Please send the following:

  1. A cover letter sharing your research interests and reasons for applying to graduate school;
  2. CV;
  3. university transcripts;  and
  4. a writing sample.

Deadline: 1 February 2019

Please note that only short-listed applicants will be contacted for an interview.

Kyla Tienhaara

Kyla Tienhaara

Dr. Kyla Tienhaara is an interdisciplinary social scientist and Canada Research Chair (CRC) in Economy and Environment. Dr. Tienhaara completed her PhD at the Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (2008).  Dr. TIenhaara also holds a Master’s degree in environmental science and law from the University of Nottingham (2002) and a Bachelor of Science in environmental science, with a minor in international relations, from the University of British Columbia (2001).

Research Interests/Current Research

Dr. Tienhaara's main area of interest is the intersection between environmental governance and the global economic system. One area of her work has examined investor-state disputes concerning environmental regulation that are brought to international arbitration under bilateral and regional investment agreements. Her more recent research, published in Green Keynesianism and the Global Financial Crisis (Routledge, 2018) explores the experience of Australia, Canada, Japan, Korea, and the United States with green stimulus programs following the 2008 global financial crisis.

Dr. Tienhaara will continue to expand on this area of research, with a particular focus on Green Keynesian initiatives in Canada and the United States, in my CRC research program.

 

 

 

 

Masculine Aspirations, Migrant Realities: Disciplining Undocumented South Asian Men In Greek Agriculture


Date:  Wednesday January 30, 2019
Venue: MacDonald Hall, Room 2
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Speaker: Reena Kukreja, Queen's University

In this talk, I argue that the agrarian crisis in Pakistan and India has created a crisis of masculinity for rural small and marginal farm-holding men by stripping away their manhood, defined by the ‘breadwinner’ ideal.  Burdened with the emasculating tag of ‘failed men’, migration overseas emerges as a compensatory masculine strategy to reinstate lost manly stature. In recent years, these rural migrants have filled a vital labour gap in the agrarian economy of Greece, the revitalization of which is also attributed to the large-scale use of cheap and flexible migrant force. Drawing upon my research in rural Greece, I trace the processes through which the disciplinary mechanisms of migration and labour regimes, contingent on ‘illegality’ of status and exercised by threats of deportation, succeed in reinforcing abject masculinity within this group of undocumented male migrants. The fear of humiliating and emasculatory public spectacles of deportation works efficiently to enforce labour compliancy, keep it captive and docile, and make extraction of labour more efficient from these men’s racialised labouring bodies. I contend that the disciplinary power is also linked to racism, Islamophobia and the Greek ethno-nationalist project of ensuring racial homogeneity in the country as it enforces a self-imposed discipline of invisibility from Greek public spaces by these men. Lastly, I foreground the novel use of a South Asian sport, Kabaddi, an embodiment of the men’s rural cultural identity, as a defiant act of masculine assertion and a highly visible resistance strategy against the disciplinary power of deportability.

Reena Kukreja

Susan Belyea

Dr. Reena Kukreja is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s University and a Visiting Fellow at the International Migration Research Centre at the Balsillie School of International Affairs, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo. She divides time between teaching, research, and filmmaking. She has directed several award-winning documentaries on rural women in India and South Asia. She has published in journals such as Modern Asian Studies and the Journal of Intercultural Studies.

 

 

Neoliberalism, Dispossession and Forced Displacement: Investigating Morocco and Tunisia’s Migrant Crisis


Date:  Monday January 28, 2019
Venue: Jeffrey Hall, Room 225
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:30 PM
Speaker: Angela Joya, Department of International Studies, University of Oregon

In December of 2018 more than 163 countries, including Canada, signed on to the United Nations Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration. The Compact is a response to the contemporary refugee/migrant crisis with the goal of addressing the root causes of forced migration. That Morocco was the setting for this significant global conference was no coincidence. The Middle East and North Africa have been at the center of the contemporary refugee/migrant crisis, with thousands risking their lives attempting to cross the Mediterranean to reach Europe. While the wars and conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa have been a main driver of the displacement of people, the economic reforms associated with the neoliberal development project (such as, agricultural reform, labour market restructuring and privatization) have also played an important role. In the literature on global migration and forced displacement, however, the links between neoliberal development policies and forced displacement have not been sufficiently established. In this talk, I argue that the economic reform policies associated with neoliberal globalization have contributed to the forced displacement of people from Morocco and Tunisia. This raises questions about the feasibility of liberal approaches to migration that are rooted in a refugee/migrant distinction, and the inability of the global Compact to get to the root of the migration problem by failing to problematize the neoliberal development model they continue to promote.

Angela Joya

Kelsey Norman

Angela Joya's research focuses on  economic globalization (neoliberalism) and the ways this phenomenon shapes the relationships among various social classes, the institutions and practices of the state.  She has researched the impact of economic liberalization and privatization on workers' and peasants' livelihoods in the post 1990 period. She has written about the struggles against neoliberalism by workers, peasants and other social groups, which culminated into the popular uprisings that swept across the Middle East and North Africa. Since the Arab uprisings of 2010-2011, she has focused on the popular contestations of the economic and political systems in the MENA region and the role of international financial institutions in the region. Dr. Joya's current research project examines the current migrant/refugee crisis in the Mediterranean in the context of global development policies. She has conducted fieldwork in Egypt, Palestine, Jordan and Turkey, Greece and France. Dr. Joya is currently completing her book manuscript titled "From Dispossession to Revolt: The Political Economy of Egypt under Mubarak" :

 

 

 

 

 

Migration and Development Tenure Track Position: Applications due 27Nov2018

Department of Global Development Studies, Queen’s University
Tenure-Track Position
Migration and Development

The Department of Global Development Studies (DEVS) at Queen’s University invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the field of Migration and Development. We welcome applicants whose research employs both political economy and socio-cultural analysis to understand the role of international migration within development dynamics. The scholar would assess how migration pathways and networks are created; their impacts on lives and livelihoods in both ‘home’ and ‘receiving’ regions; how development policies are designed to shape, promote or inhibit migration; and how migrants actively strive to shape their migration experience. A geographic focus on West Asia or North Africa would be considered an asset. The successful candidate will assume responsibility for one or more of our core undergraduate and graduate courses. The preferred start date is July 1, 2019.

Candidates must have a PhD or equivalent degree completed at the start date of the appointment. The main criteria for selection are research and teaching excellence. The successful candidate will provide evidence of strong potential for outstanding teaching contributions at the undergraduate and graduate levels. They will be expected to work collaboratively with other members in the department in the area of curriculum design. Methodological innovation and comfort with current and emergent teaching technologies will also be assets. The successful candidate will provide evidence of high quality scholarly output that demonstrates potential for independent research moving beyond the dissertation and leading to peer-assessed publications. Candidates must provide evidence of strong communicative and interpersonal skills combined with a flexible attitude and ability to work in an interdisciplinary, collaborative environment. The successful candidate will also be expected to make substantive contributions through service to the department, to the Faculty, to the University, and/or to the broader community. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen's is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. DEVS is enriched intellectually, socially and culturally by the presence and participation of people from diverse educational backgrounds, including from the Global South.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and Permanent Residents of Canada will be given priority.

To comply with Federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information about how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada. Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship, however, all applications must include one of the following statements:

  • “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR,
  • “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”.

Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

A complete application consists of:

  • a cover letter (including one of the two statements regarding Canadian citizenship / permanent resident status specified in the previous paragraph);
  • a current Curriculum Vitae (including a list of publications);
  • a sample of academic writing;
  • a statement of research interests; and
  • a teaching dossier or statement of teaching interests and experience (including teaching outlines and evaluations if available).

Short-listed candidates will be further requested to provide three letters of reference.

The deadline for applications is 11:59 PM EST on November 27, 2018

Applications should be addressed to Dr. Marcus Taylor, Department Head, Global Development Studies. We encourage applicants to send all documents in their application packages electronically (either as PDFs or MS Word files) to Barbra Brousseau devsmanager@queensu.ca, although hard copy applications may be submitted to:

Department of Global Development Studies
Mackintosh-Corry Hall, B401
Queen’s University
68 University Avenue
Kingston, Ontario CANADA K7L 3N6
Attn: Barbra Brousseau, Department Manager
Email: devsmanager@queensu.ca (preferred)

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Barbra Brousseau at 613-533-6000 x 77210 or via email at devsmanager@queensu.ca

Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the University and the Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA), which is posted at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/col... and at http://www.qufa.ca.

Click here to view the position posting in PDF format.

Dr. Susanne Soederberg is a plenary speaker at the National Housing Conference in Ottawa on November 21-22, 2018

National Housing Conference
November 21-22, 2018
National Arts Centre, Ottawa, ON

Topic: A place to call home or a place to accumulate wealth? Inequality and exclusion in housing markets

For investors, housing has become a commodity - a means to secure and accumulate wealth. However, for most households, income and wealth inequalities have created an environment where it’s become increasingly difficult to find a place to live in dignity and thrive in a community. Four experts bring the perspectives of academia, government, politics and policy to understanding market needs and explore solutions to rising inequality and social exclusion.

Speakers:

  • Evan Siddall, 
  • Leilani Farha, 
  • Michael Oxley, 
  • Manuel Aalbers, 
  • Susanne Soederberg 

Research Lecture: Geo-social Formations: Political Geology in Plurinational Bolivia

 

Andrea MarstonGeo-social Formations: Political Geology in Plurinational Bolivia

Date: Friday October 19, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, Room D216
Time: 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Speaker: Andrea Marston, 2014 Trudeau Scholar, PhD Candidate, Geography, University of California Berkeley

Abstract

Geo-social Formations: Political Geology in Plurinational Bolivia

Bolivian mining cooperatives are commonly described as mobsters, savage capitalists, and thieves of national wealth. Nevertheless, these small-scale miners have won significant influence in Bolivia’s radically restructured Plurinational State, in which the rights of both Indigenous peoples and Pachamama (Earth Mother) have been constitutionally enshrined since 2009. Agitating for relaxed environmental standards and expanded concession areas, cooperative miners help maintain Bolivia’s ‘neo-extractivist’ economy even in an era of putatively Indigenous nation-building. In this talk, I trace the subterranean processes through which cooperative miners emerge as workers and political subjects. Specifically, I explore the ‘geo-social formation’ of cooperative miners operating in abandoned tin mines in the highland towns of Llallagua-Uncía, Potosí. Centering labor as a site of analysis, I argue that the specific material qualities of tin shape workers’ fleshy bodies and their body politic, internally stratified along lines of race and gender, as surely as miners transform ore into a commodity. Such geo-social formations, produced in the geologized contact zone of Indigenous agricultural communities and ruined trade unionism, are in turn shaping the contours of extractive resource regimes in Bolivia. Through this work, I remake political ecology by locating geological histories and subterranean places – both typically bracketed from social inquiry – at its very heart.

 

Research Lecture: Knowledge, power and natural resources: 
Reflections from Chile

 

Javiera Barandiaran

Knowledge, power and natural resources: 
Reflections from Chile

Date: Friday October 12, 2018
Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, Room D216
Time: 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Speaker: Dr. Javiera Barandiaran, Department of Global Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

Abstract

Chile presents a seemingly peculiar case of a modern state that at the turn of the twenty-first century does not see a need to invest in science nor cultivate scientific advice as a strategic ally of the state. Chile has not invested in environmental science labs, state agencies with in-house capacities, or an ancillary network of trusted scientific advisers—despite the growing complexity of environmental problems and increasing popular demand for more active environmental stewardship. The first part of this talk will explain how this mode of governance works (as a market for science), reflecting neoliberal influences which favor market mechanisms over the actions of state agencies. The consequences for regulation and trust in state agencies will be illustrated with the case of salmon farming: in 2008 Chile’s salmon farms (the world’s second most productive) suffered a devastating epidemic that state agencies struggled to control. The second part of the talk will explore the history of this market-based mode of governance and its consequences for lithium mining and development imaginaries. Chile, along with Argentina and Bolivia, host 80% of global deposits of this material that may be crucial to reducing fossil fuel use. How to use lithium and lithium-science for development is highly contested. Understanding Chile’s knowledge politics sheds new light on environmental regulation, natural resource management and democratic governance.

 

 

Research Lecture: From Coercion to Consent: Postneoliberal politics, oil palm expansion and agrarian transformations in the Brazilian Amazon

 

Diana Cordoba

From Coercion to Consent: Postneoliberal politics, oil palm expansion and agrarian transformations in the Brazilian Amazon

Date: Wednesday October 10, 2018
Venue: Kingston Hall, Room 208
Time: 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Speaker: Dr. Diana Cordoba, SSHRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Environmental Studies - University of Victoria
 

Abstract

In 2010, the Workers’ Party (PT) launched the Sustainable Oil Palm Production Program (SPOPP) to support oil palm expansion in the Brazilian Amazon. Moving away from previous neoliberal policies, the PT promised to use state power to reverse historical processes of inequality in rural areas by addressing crucial issues of land titling and land access, social movements’ participation and empowerment, environmental degradation, and resource distribution. Using a political ecology approach, Dr. Córdoba examines PT’s ability to impose its hegemonic project. Drawing upon primary fieldwork data, she shows that the PT, through its strong link with social movements, had a central role in articulating social movements' and agribusiness' contrasting politico-economic agendas and interests and facilitating consent around oil palm monocrop expansion. She argues, however, that the SPOPP intervention ultimately worked to reinforce large-scale production and exclude peasants and popular movements. By promoting the concentration of land ownership and by failing to improve the terms of incorporation of marginalized actors in the oil palm complex, the SPOPP model speaks to the limits of PT’s post-neoliberal reforms in Brazil

 

 

Political Ecology of Natural Resource Management in Latin America Tenure Track Position: Applications due 13Sept2018

Department of Global Development Studies, Queen’s University
Tenure-Track Position

The Political Ecology of Natural Resource Management in Latin America

The Department of Global Development Studies (DEVS) at Queen’s University invites applications for a Tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the field of The Political Ecology of Natural Resource Management in Latin America. We welcome applicants whose research examines the political ecology of natural resource management in areas such as agriculture, energy, mining, forestry or fisheries. Candidates would demonstrate a clear research focus on how resource management regimes are constructed, enacted and contested at local, regional and/or national levels. Candidates working on the relationship between indigenous peoples and the politics of resource management are particularly encouraged to apply. The successful applicant will demonstrate the necessary background to teach one or more of our foundational undergraduate courses such as The Political Economy of Development; Culture and Development; Global Environmental Transformations; Introduction to Indigenous Studies; Research Methods; Theories of Development, etc. The preferred start date is July 1, 2019.

Candidates must have a PhD or equivalent degree completed at the start date of the appointment.  The main criteria for selection are academic and teaching excellence. The successful candidate will provide evidence of strong potential for outstanding teaching contributions at the undergraduate and graduate levels. S/he will be expected to work collaboratively with other members in the department in the area of curriculum design. Methodological innovation and comfort with current and emergent teaching technologies will also be assets. The successful candidate will provide evidence of high quality scholarly output that demonstrates potential for independent research moving beyond the dissertation and leading to peer-assessed publications. Candidates must provide evidence of strong communicative and interpersonal skills combined with a flexible attitude and an ability to work in an interdisciplinary, collaborative environment. The successful candidate will also be expected to make substantive contributions through service to the department, to the Faculty, to the University, and/or to the broader community. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen's is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. DEVS is enriched intellectually, socially and culturally by the presence and participation of people from diverse educational backgrounds, including from the Global South. 

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and Permanent Residents of Canada will be given priority.

To comply with Federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information about how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada. Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship; however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

A complete application consists of:

  • a cover letter (including one of the two statements regarding Canadian citizenship / permanent resident status specified in the previous paragraph);
  • a current Curriculum Vitae (including a list of publications);
  • a sample of academic writing;
  • a statement of research interests; and
  • a teaching dossier or statement of teaching interests and experience (including teaching outlines and evaluations if available).
  • Short-listed candidates will be further requested to provide three letters of reference.

The deadline for applications is September 13th, 2018.

Applications should be addressed to Dr. Marcus Taylor, Department Head, Global Development Studies.  We encourage applicants to send all documents in their application packages electronically (either as PDFs or MS Word files) to Barbra Brousseau bb13@queensu.ca, although hard copy applications may be submitted to:

Department of Global Development Studies
Mackintosh-Corry Hall, B401, Queen’s University
68 University Avenue
Kingston, Ontario CANADA K7L 3N6
Attn:  Barbra Brousseau, Department Manager
Email:  bb13@queensu.ca (preferred)

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Barbra Brousseau bb13@queensu.ca  or at 613-533-6000 x 77210.

Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the University and the Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA), which is posted at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/col... and at http://www.qufa.ca.

Click here to view the position posting in PDF format.

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