Department of Global Development Studies

DEPARTMENT OF

Global Development Studies

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Dr. Rebecca Hall appointed to DEVS effective July 1, 2018

Rebecca Hall

Welcome to Dr. Rebecca Hall

The Department of Global Development Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s University is happy to announce the appointment of Dr. Rebecca Hall as the Assistant Professor in the field of The Political Economy of Extraction and Development effective July 1, 2018. Rebecca Hall holds a PhD in Political Science from York University and takes a feminist political economy approach to questions related to resource extraction and community development, Indigenous/Canadian State relations, decolonizing methodologies, and gender-based violence.

Dr. Hall’s scholarly publications have examined multiple sites of contemporary de/colonizing struggle in Canada, including resource extraction, property relations, caring labours, and interpersonal violence. Her dissertation, awarded the Mary McEwan Memorial Award for feminist research, examines the impact of the northern diamond mining industry on Indigenous women. Dr. Hall’s research interests come out of her community work in the Northwest Territories, and she is grateful to the workers at The Native Women’s Association of the Northwest Territories and to the communities in and around Yellowknife for their teachings and their generosity.

During the 2018-2019 academic year, Dr. Hall will be teaching, DEVS 220 (Topics in Aboriginal Studies), DEVS 392 (The Political Economy of Resource Extraction) and DEVS 803 (Research Methods).

 

 

SNID Program Coordinator Position Available 2018-19

Studies in National and International Development

PROGRAM COORDINATOR POSITION
Studies in National and International Development
Queen’s University, Kingston, ON CAN K7L 3N6

Studies in National and International Development (SNID) is the longest-running weekly, interdisciplinary seminar series at Queen's University. Since 1983, SNID has proudly hosted prominent Canadian and international scholars who bring fresh perspectives to issues of local, national and global development. 

SNID invites applications from Queen’s graduate students for the position of Program Coordinator for the 2018-2019 academic year with the possibility of renewal for the 2019-2020 academic year. The successful candidate will be responsible for:

  • fundraising initiatives
  • coordination of speaker logistics (travel plans, expense reimbursement);
  • website maintenance (knowledge of WebPublish is preferred);
  • listserv management;
  • social media networking;
  • email correspondence; and
  • preparation and distribution of promotional materials;

The Program Coordinator position runs from August to March each year. SNID sessions are held Thursdays from 1:00 PM until 2:30 PM. The Program Coordinator must be available to attend weekly talks and must be registered as a graduate student at Queen’s University.  Preference will be given to graduate students in the early stages of their graduate work. The position is approximately forty (40) hours per month.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons.

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during this process, please contact: Department of Global Studies, Barbra Brousseau, bb13@queensu.ca, 613-533-6000 x77210.

Applications should include a cover letter outlining the candidate’s interest and qualifications in the position, a complete and current curriculum vitae, and a letter of reference from one (1) referee, as well as any other relevant materials the candidate wishes to submit for consideration. 

Please arrange to have applications and supporting documentation sent directly to:

Barbra Brousseau, Departmental Administrator
Department of Global Development Studies
Email: bb13@queensu.ca

Review of applications will begin on June 8, 2018 and continue until the position is filled. The final appointment is subject to budgetary approval.   Additional information about Studies in National and International Development can be found at http://www.queensu.ca/snid/

 

 

Creating Counter-Narratives in Spaces of Privilege

Creating Counter-Narratives in Spaces of Privilege

Special report back from DEVS third year student Kelsey Sleep Jennings who has been working for the past term as an Intern for the City of Kingston with QUIP

Kelsey Working as an Intern for the City of Kingston

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My QUIP internship with the City of Kingston’s Cultural Heritage Department has taught me a lot about how to transfer my DEVS knowledge into real-life situations. Starting in September of 2017, I began my internship as a Digital Research intern; something you likely would not associate with a DEVS major, however my role soon shifted as I was thrust into conversations surrounding Sir John A. Macdonald and his legacy within Kingston. Although I was not employed due to my knowledge as a DEVS major it turned out to be a huge asset to my department and ongoing conversations of developing counter-narratives.

Working alongside the City Curator and Collections Technician we often discussed the divide that the Sir John A. legacy made in Kingston; Some viewing him in a heroic light, others understandably frustrated with his legacies of treatment of Indigenous peoples in Canada. I was fortunate enough to be able to work alongside Kingston’s reconciliation process which included creating strong counter-narratives to help build a deep understanding of the complexities of the city itself. Creating a counter-narrative means that instead of “erasing history” as argued by many proponents of presenting the Sir John A. Legacy in Kingston, we would be creating alternative narratives which fall along the same timeline, yet reveal the reality of life for other demographics in the city. The majority of counter narrating that we have undertaken surrounds the Sir John A. Legacy and the livelihoods of Indigenous people in Canada.

One thing that students can look forward to seeing very soon is counter-narratives popping up in perhaps one of the largest spaces of privilege in Kingston; City Hall. With items brought forth by Indigenous community members, exhibits are being curated that will put on display one aspect of the Indigenous experience in Kingston through the use of traditional Cradle Boards. Creating these counter-narratives are vital to creating a Kingston that is accessible and addresses its past failures. It is completely okay that we acknowledge that Sir John A. did significant things to create the Canada we see today. However, it is not okay to ignore the other timelines that existed and it is certainly not okay to fail to address the horrific treatment of Indigenous people under Sir John A. Macdonald’s power. Creating counter-narratives has proven to be an effective way to be sure to address these colonial pasts while attempting to decolonize spaces of privilege and authority while bringing light to the realities of Kingston’s history. 

DEVS 293: Global Mental Health Teaching Position Available (Fall 2018)

TEACHING POSITION AVAILABLE 2018-2019 (Fall Term)
DEVS 293: Global Mental Health
Department of Global Development Studies
Queen’s University, Kingston, ON CAN K7L 3N6

The Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s University invites applications from suitably qualified candidates interested in teaching a second year topics course entitled “Global Mental Health” (DEVS 293). This is an on-campus, lecture course with an expected enrolment of 100 students. Candidates should have a MA or PhD, and teaching experience at the University level in Global Development Studies. This is a fall term appointment for the period of September 1, 2018 to December 31, 2018, with classes in session from September 6, 2018 to November 30, 2018.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during this process, please contact: Department of Global Studies, Barbra Brousseau, bb13@queensu.ca, 613-533-6000 x77210.

The academic staff at Queen's University are governed by the Collective Agreement between the Queen's University Faculty Association (QUFA) and the University, which is posted at http://www.queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/queens-qufa-collective-agreement.

To comply with Federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information about how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada.  Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship, however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

Applications should include a complete and current curriculum vitae, letters of reference from two referees, course description/outline and any other relevant materials the candidate wishes to submit for consideration such as a letter of intent, teaching dossier, etc. Please arrange to have applications and supporting letters sent directly to:

Barbra Brousseau, Department Administrator
Department of Global Development Studies
Queen’s University
Kingston Ontario Canada K7L 3N6
Email:  bb13@queensu.ca

Applications will be received until April 13, 2018.  Review of applications will commence shortly thereafter, and the final appointment is subject to budgetary approval.  Additional information about the Department of Global Development Studies can be found at http://www.queensu.ca/devs


Course Description:

DEVS 293/0.5 Topics in Development Studies II

Lectures and courses offered by regular and visiting faculty on development topics related to their research interests. Consult the departmental homepage for further details of specific course offerings each year.

LEARNING HOURS:  120 (24L; 12T; 84P)
PREREQUISITES:  Level 2 or above

 

Students answer the prime minister’s reconciliation challenge

 
Thohahoken (Michael Doxtater) and student Cosimo Morin (Artsci'18) lead the joint class in an Indigenous song the class rehearsed in anticipation of the event. (University Communications)

Students answer the prime minister’s reconciliation challenge

Thursday March 29, 2018

A joint class of Arts and Science students examined the relationship between Indigenous Peoples and settler communities through a social justice exposition.ther topics explored by the joint class include "The Monstrous Other" in pop culture - demonstrating unfair portrayals of, among others, Indigenous Peoples.hohahoken (Michael Doxtater) and student Cosimo Morin (Artsci'18) lead the joint class in an Indigenous song the class rehearsed in anticipation of the event.

Students in a Global Development Studies course and a Languages, Literatures, and Cultures course have come together to spark a dialogue around the issues identified in the national Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) report.

Under the guidance of Thohahoken (Michael Doxtater), Queen's National Scholar in Indigenous Studies: Land- and Language-Based Pedagogies and Practices, the students have organized the “Treaty Peoples Social Justice Expo”, a poster fair in Stirling Hall. The event was aimed at increasing awareness of Indigenous Peoples issues and honour their cultures and languages. The idea to host a poster fair was Dr. Doxtater’s, as a way to foster his students’ learning while also providing them an opportunity to find topics that relate to their interests.

“The aim was to engage these young people in the prime minister’s challenge to ‘move towards a nation-to-nation relationship based on recognition, rights, respect, cooperation, and partnership’,” says Dr. Doxtater. “I am proud of the students’ efforts, and pleased that we were able to engage two distinct classes in this multidisciplinary look at contemporary Indigenous issues.”

To help create a respectful and inclusive environment, Wednesday’s event opened with greetings from Elder Mishiikenh (Vernon Altiman) of Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre. Then, guests were welcome to explore the room and learn about 13 topics related to the well-being of Indigenous Peoples.

“The poster fair included examinations of issues such as environmental resistance and the impact of development on Indigenous health, incarceration of Indigenous peoples, and even portrayals of Indigenous Peoples in sports,” says Penny Cornwall (Artsci’18), one of the organizers. “My team’s project, Maanamanji’o, focused on suicide and mental health in Pikangikum First Nation – a community with an alarmingly high suicide rate.”

Ms. Cornwall notes one of her peers has a personal connection to the Pikangikum community, and this student’s passion led the team to explore that topic.

Dr. Doxtater was hired in 2017 as part of the Principal’s faculty renewal efforts. He is a Queen’s National Scholar cross-appointed to the Departments of Global Development Studies and Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. Learn more about Dr. Doxtater here.

DEVS Student Nicholas Pearce Recipient of Eileen Krieger Award

 
Nick Pearce Receives Award

DEVS Student Nicholas Pearce Recipient of Eileen Krieger Award 

The DEVS Department is pleased to announce Nick Pearce as this year’s recipient of the Eileen Krieger Award.

The award is in memory of former DEVS student Eileen Krieger who passed away in 2003 and seeks to honour a graduating student in the DEVS program who demonstrates the qualities that were cherished in Eileen: strong extra‐curricular involvement at Queen’s University, a positive and energetic attitude, strong leadership skills, and excellent academic standing.

The difficulty faced by the Award Committee in choosing the winning candidate every year is that the pool of candidates is always so amazing, it’s very difficult to choose only one winner.

During his four years at Queen’s, Nick served as the Communications Director at the Queen’s Native Student Association, was a Staff Writer for the Queen’s International Observer and was also the Arts Editor and Features Editor for the Queen’s Journal.

Congratulations Nick, you stood out among a great pool of talent in DEVS and we look forward to hearing what the future holds for you.

 

Dr. Reena Kukreja receives a Queen's Scholarly Research Award

 
Kamari ClarkeProfile Photo

Congratulations to Dr. Reena Kukreja

The department of Global Development Studies congratulates Dr. Reena Kukreja for her successful application to the Scholarly Research and Creative Work Fund for the project entitled "Love, Longing, And Desire: Exploring The Crisis Of Masculinity And Family (Re)Formation Of Undocumented South Asian Male Migrants In Greece".

Reena’s research focuses on undocumented South Asian male migrants from Bangladesh, India and Pakistan in Greece. She examines the intersections of displacement-induced migration with anti-immigrant and Islamophobic discourses, securitization of citizenship through border controls and deportation, and the role of class, education, race, nationality, and religion on the masculine identity and aspirations of these undocumented South Asian men. Her study builds on and contributes to theoretical concepts and debates in transnational family migration studies and citizenship rights of undocumented migrants. She is going to use the funding to undertake a preliminary research with undocumented South Asian men working in the informal urban sector in Athens and in agriculture in the rural regions surrounding Argos in Greece.

The Fund for Scholarly Research and Creative Work and Professional Development (Adjuncts), provides support for scholarly and creative work or professional development undertaken by eligible Adjunct Members. For more information relating to this fund, please visit the Faculty Relations website at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/professional-support-programs/fund-scholarly-research-and-creative

 

DEVS 492: Mining in Latin America Teaching Position Available (Winter 2019)

TEACHING POSITION AVAILABLE 2018-2019 (Winter Term)
DEVS 492: Mining in Latin America
Department of Global Development Studies
Queen’s University, Kingston, ON CAN K7L 3N6

The Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s University invites applications from suitably qualified candidates interested in teaching a fourth year seminar course entitled “Mining in Latin America” (DEVS 492). This is an on-campus, seminar course with an expected enrolment of 25 students. Candidates should have a MA or PhD, and teaching experience at the University level in Global Development Studies. This is a winter term appointment for the period of January 1, 2019 to April 30, 2019, with classes in session from January 7, 2019 to April 5, 2019.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during this process, please contact: Department of Global Studies, Barbra Brousseau, bb13@queensu.ca, 613-533-6000 x77210.

The academic staff at Queen's University are governed by the Collective Agreement between the Queen's University Faculty Association (QUFA) and the University, which is posted at http://www.queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/queens-qufa-collective-agreement.

To comply with Federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information about how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada.  Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship, however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

Applications should include a complete and current curriculum vitae, letters of reference from two referees, course description/outline and any other relevant materials the candidate wishes to submit for consideration such as a letter of intent, teaching dossier, etc. Please arrange to have applications and supporting letters sent directly to:

Barbra Brousseau, Department Administrator
Department of Global Development Studies
Queen’s University
Kingston Ontario Canada K7L 3N6
Email:  bb13@queensu.ca

Applications will be received until March 16, 2018.  Review of applications will commence shortly thereafter, and the final appointment is subject to budgetary approval.  Additional information about the Department of Global Development Studies can be found at http://www.queensu.ca/devs.


Course Description:

DEVS 492/0.5 Topics in Development Studies
Seminars offered by regular and visiting faculty on development topics related to their research interests. Consult the departmental homepage for further details of specific course offerings each year.
NOTE    Taught concurrently with DEVS 86X/3.0.
LEARNING HOURS:  120 (36L; 84P)PREREQUISITE:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan

 

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