Department of Global Development Studies

DEPARTMENT OF

Global Development Studies

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Canadian Association of African Studies Conference Hosted at Queen's

 

Canadian Association of African Studies Conference Hosted at Queen's

Dr. Marc Epprecht, the outgoing president of the Canadian Association of African Studies, wraps up this year's very successful annual conference with an address to the delegates on Sunday (May 6th). Over 140 attendees came from 17 countries to share their research on such diverse topics as resources extraction, climate change, sexual and reproductive rights, refugees and immigration, the crisis in Zimbabwe and much more. Queen's was well-represented with over twenty graduate students from a wide range of departments including DEVS. Here, Marc convinces the delegates to support accounting for carbon offsets in future conference fees. This years conference generated an estimated 300 tonnes carbon.

For more information click on the following link to see the Queen's Gazette Article from May 11, African Studies Conference Focuses on Transformation

DEVS 240: Culture and Development Teaching Position Available (Winter 2018)

TEACHING POSITION AVAILABLE 2018-2019 (Winter Term)
DEVS 240:  Culture and Development
Department of Global Development Studies

Queen’s University, Kingston, ON CAN K7L 3N6

The Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s University invites applications from suitably qualified candidates interested in teaching a second year lecture course entitled “Culture and Development” (DEVS 240). This is an on-campus, lecture course with an expected enrolment of 200 students. Candidates should have a MA or PhD, and teaching experience at the University level in Global Development Studies. This is a winter term appointment for the period of January 1, 2019 to April 30, 2019, with classes in session from January 7, 2019 to April 5, 2019.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during this process, please contact: Department of Global Studies, Barbra Brousseau, bb13@queensu.ca, 613-533-6000 x77210.

The academic staff at Queen's University are governed by the Collective Agreement between the Queen's University Faculty Association (QUFA) and the University, which is posted at http://www.queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/queens-qufa-collective-agreement.

To comply with Federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information about how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada.  Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship, however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

Applications should include a complete and current curriculum vitae, letters of reference from two referees, and any other relevant materials the candidate wishes to submit for consideration such as a letter of intent, teaching dossier, etc.  Please note that the letters of reference should be sent separately by a qualified referee who is familiar with the applicant's teaching experience. Please arrange to have applications and supporting letters sent directly to:

Barbra Brousseau, Department Administrator
Department of Global Development Studies

Mackintosh-Corry Hall, B401, Queen’s University
68 University Avenue
Kingston Ontario Canada K7L 3N9
Email:  bb13@queensu.ca (preferred method)

Applications will be received until May 25, 2018.  Review of applications will commence shortly thereafter, and the final appointment is subject to budgetary approval.  Additional information about the Department of Global Development Studies can be found at http://www.queensu.ca/devs.

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Course Description:

DEVS 240 Culture and Development

Provides students with a broad overview of debates relating to development and culture, including issues of religion, music, sport, art and literature, and how these interact with economic policy and political change.

LEARNING HOURS    120 (24L;12T;84P)

 

DEVS 220: Introduction to Aboriginal Studies Online Teaching Position Available (Winter 2019)

COURSE DEVELOPER/INSTRUCTOR POSITION AVAILABLE
Course Development to begin June 1, 2018
Term Adjunct appointment anticipated for Winter Term 2019

DEVS 220:  Introduction to Aboriginal Studies
Department of Global Development Studies
Queen’s University, Kingston, ON CAN K7L 3N6

The Department of Global Development Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s University invites applications from suitably qualified candidates interested in jointly redeveloping and teaching Introduction to Aboriginal Studies.  This is an online undergraduate course with an expected enrolment of 95 students. The contract for course development will commence July 1, 2018, with the offering of the course anticipated to be in winter term, January 1, 2019 to April 30, 2019, with classes in session from January 7, 2019 to April 5, 2019.

Candidates should have a MA or PhD, and teaching experience at the University level in Global Development Studies and experience working within an online learning management platform (such as onQ). Candidates should also have experience in course design, development, and online delivery.

In addition to expertise in the relevant academic subject, as a Course Developer the candidate needs to:

  • Work in partnership with an instructional designer and Continuing and Distance Studies to take an active learning approach to the design of the course using best practices in online learning to meet the quality standards
  • be comfortable with technology, interested in how technology can enhance teaching and learning, and open to learning and using new technologies
  • be prepared to meet  project timelines that are determined collaboratively at the start of the project
  • be willing to teach the first offering of the course

As this course is being offered online, the successful candidate as the Course Instructor will also need to :

  • have regular access to high speed internet and a computer that meets current specifications
  • be willing to take an active role in delivering the course and communicating regularly with students
  • be open to learning how to use the new technologies in order to be effective in the virtual environment
  • be flexible in terms of availability, which may include offering online office hours via the web at times outside of the regular 9-5 work week
  • be willing to provide students with timely and constructive feedback
  • be comfortable with working in a partnership with Continuing and Distance Studies in the delivery of the course.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during this process, please contact: Department of Global Studies, Barbra Brousseau, bb13@queensu.ca, 613-533-6000 x77210.

The academic staff at Queen's University are governed by the Collective Agreement between the Queen's University Faculty Association (QUFA) and the University, which is posted at http://www.queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/queens-qufa-collective-agreement.

To comply with Federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information about how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada.  Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship, however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

Applications should include a complete and current curriculum vitae, letters of reference from two referees, a course description/outline, and any other relevant materials the candidate wishes to submit for consideration such as a letter of intent, teaching dossier, etc. Please arrange to have applications and supporting letters sent directly to:

Barbra Brousseau, Department Administrator
Department of Global Development Studies
Mackintosh-Corry Hall, B401, Queen’s University
68 University Avenue
Kingston Ontario Canada K7L 3N9
Email:  bb13@queensu.ca (preferred method)

Applications will be received until May 18, 2018.  Review of applications will commence shortly thereafter, and the final appointment is subject to budgetary approval.  Additional information about the Department of Global Development Studies can be found at http://www.queensu.ca/devs.

~~

Course Description

DEVS 220 Introduction to Aboriginal Studies
An introduction to Aboriginal world view and culture organized on an historical basis, from Creation to 1969, emphasizing Aboriginal culture and experience in Canada. Aboriginal perspectives will be introduced through traditional teaching methods and contributions from elders and other community members

POSTED:  May 1, 2018

 

 

Dr. Marcus Taylor appointed DEVS Department Head, effective July 1, 2018

 
Kamari ClarkeProfile Photo

Congratulations to Dr. Marcus Taylor

The Department of Global Development Studies congratulates Dr. Marcus Taylor on his appointment of Head, Department of Global Development Studies for the period July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2023.

Dr. Taylor has taught in the Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s since 2006 and is cross-appointed to the Department of Sociology and the School of Environmental Studies. He researches and teaches courses on the political ecology of development, with a focus on agriculture, labour and livelihoods as reflected in courses such as DEVS 250: Global Environmental Transformations and DEVS 311: Labour and Global Development. His current SSHRC funded project is on new approaches to rice cultivation in south Asia in conditions of climate change, livelihood strains, and mounting pressures to ensure food security by increasing yields. Recently books by Dr. Taylor include The Political Ecology of Climate Change Adaptation (Routledge 2015) and Global Labour Studies (with Sébastien Rioux, Polity Press, 2018).

Dr. Taylor has been the graduate chair within Global Development Studies for the past five years, and recently spearheaded the establishment of a PhD program of study within DEVS. Faculty, staff, and students are looking forward to working with Dr. Taylor as the new department Head in Global Development Studies starting in July 2018. 

Special thanks is extended to Dr. Marc Epprecht for his tireless work as the Department Head of Global Development Studies over the past six years.   

 

DEVS to offer a PhD program starting in September 2018

Global Development Studies PhD program Approved

The Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s University extends its innovative approach to the field of development studies with its newly approved Ph.D. program.

Welcoming its first cohort in 2018, the PhD in Global Development Studies will prepare students to apply advanced development research within a rapidly changing global policy context.

Global Development Studies at Queen’s enjoys well-established pedagogical profile at the graduate level that gives us a clear identity within the Canadian and international context.  

The foundations of our innovative and quality doctoral program are grounded in four core research and pedagogical themes: the political economy of development; the cultural politics of development; indigenous studies; and development and sustainability. Students receive teaching, training, supervision and research support across these themes.

The advanced interdisciplinary research and teaching skills that the program provides are in strong demand among employers that include national and international development agencies, university research and teaching, the public sector, non-governmental organisations, the business sector and the media.

Dr. Rebecca Hall appointed to DEVS effective July 1, 2018

Rebecca Hall

Welcome to Dr. Rebecca Hall

The Department of Global Development Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s University is happy to announce the appointment of Dr. Rebecca Hall as the Assistant Professor in the field of The Political Economy of Extraction and Development effective July 1, 2018. Rebecca Hall holds a PhD in Political Science from York University and takes a feminist political economy approach to questions related to resource extraction and community development, Indigenous/Canadian State relations, decolonizing methodologies, and gender-based violence.

Dr. Hall’s scholarly publications have examined multiple sites of contemporary de/colonizing struggle in Canada, including resource extraction, property relations, caring labours, and interpersonal violence. Her dissertation, awarded the Mary McEwan Memorial Award for feminist research, examines the impact of the northern diamond mining industry on Indigenous women. Dr. Hall’s research interests come out of her community work in the Northwest Territories, and she is grateful to the workers at The Native Women’s Association of the Northwest Territories and to the communities in and around Yellowknife for their teachings and their generosity.

During the 2018-2019 academic year, Dr. Hall will be teaching, DEVS 220 (Topics in Aboriginal Studies), DEVS 392 (The Political Economy of Resource Extraction) and DEVS 803 (Research Methods).

 

 

SNID Program Coordinator Position Available 2018-19

Studies in National and International Development

PROGRAM COORDINATOR POSITION
Studies in National and International Development
Queen’s University, Kingston, ON CAN K7L 3N6

Studies in National and International Development (SNID) is the longest-running weekly, interdisciplinary seminar series at Queen's University. Since 1983, SNID has proudly hosted prominent Canadian and international scholars who bring fresh perspectives to issues of local, national and global development. 

SNID invites applications from Queen’s graduate students for the position of Program Coordinator for the 2018-2019 academic year with the possibility of renewal for the 2019-2020 academic year. The successful candidate will be responsible for:

  • fundraising initiatives
  • coordination of speaker logistics (travel plans, expense reimbursement);
  • website maintenance (knowledge of WebPublish is preferred);
  • listserv management;
  • social media networking;
  • email correspondence; and
  • preparation and distribution of promotional materials;

The Program Coordinator position runs from August to March each year. SNID sessions are held Thursdays from 1:00 PM until 2:30 PM. The Program Coordinator must be available to attend weekly talks and must be registered as a graduate student at Queen’s University.  Preference will be given to graduate students in the early stages of their graduate work. The position is approximately forty (40) hours per month.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons.

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during this process, please contact: Department of Global Studies, Barbra Brousseau, bb13@queensu.ca, 613-533-6000 x77210.

Applications should include a cover letter outlining the candidate’s interest and qualifications in the position, a complete and current curriculum vitae, and a letter of reference from one (1) referee, as well as any other relevant materials the candidate wishes to submit for consideration. 

Please arrange to have applications and supporting documentation sent directly to:

Barbra Brousseau, Departmental Administrator
Department of Global Development Studies
Email: bb13@queensu.ca

Review of applications will begin on June 8, 2018 and continue until the position is filled. The final appointment is subject to budgetary approval.   Additional information about Studies in National and International Development can be found at http://www.queensu.ca/snid/

 

 

Creating Counter-Narratives in Spaces of Privilege

Creating Counter-Narratives in Spaces of Privilege

Special report back from DEVS third year student Kelsey Sleep Jennings who has been working for the past term as an Intern for the City of Kingston with QUIP

Kelsey Working as an Intern for the City of Kingston

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My QUIP internship with the City of Kingston’s Cultural Heritage Department has taught me a lot about how to transfer my DEVS knowledge into real-life situations. Starting in September of 2017, I began my internship as a Digital Research intern; something you likely would not associate with a DEVS major, however my role soon shifted as I was thrust into conversations surrounding Sir John A. Macdonald and his legacy within Kingston. Although I was not employed due to my knowledge as a DEVS major it turned out to be a huge asset to my department and ongoing conversations of developing counter-narratives.

Working alongside the City Curator and Collections Technician we often discussed the divide that the Sir John A. legacy made in Kingston; Some viewing him in a heroic light, others understandably frustrated with his legacies of treatment of Indigenous peoples in Canada. I was fortunate enough to be able to work alongside Kingston’s reconciliation process which included creating strong counter-narratives to help build a deep understanding of the complexities of the city itself. Creating a counter-narrative means that instead of “erasing history” as argued by many proponents of presenting the Sir John A. Legacy in Kingston, we would be creating alternative narratives which fall along the same timeline, yet reveal the reality of life for other demographics in the city. The majority of counter narrating that we have undertaken surrounds the Sir John A. Legacy and the livelihoods of Indigenous people in Canada.

One thing that students can look forward to seeing very soon is counter-narratives popping up in perhaps one of the largest spaces of privilege in Kingston; City Hall. With items brought forth by Indigenous community members, exhibits are being curated that will put on display one aspect of the Indigenous experience in Kingston through the use of traditional Cradle Boards. Creating these counter-narratives are vital to creating a Kingston that is accessible and addresses its past failures. It is completely okay that we acknowledge that Sir John A. did significant things to create the Canada we see today. However, it is not okay to ignore the other timelines that existed and it is certainly not okay to fail to address the horrific treatment of Indigenous people under Sir John A. Macdonald’s power. Creating counter-narratives has proven to be an effective way to be sure to address these colonial pasts while attempting to decolonize spaces of privilege and authority while bringing light to the realities of Kingston’s history. 

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