Department of Global Development Studies

DEPARTMENT OF

Global Development Studies

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DEVS Course Offerings (2019-2020)

 

For information about our semester abroad program, directed reading courses, or thesis options please visit the DEVS main office located in Mackintosh-Corry Hall, B401 or send your questions to devs.student@queensu.ca.

For more detailed course information please visit the Faculty of Arts and Science website.  Please note that course information listed in the Arts and Science Course Calendar supersedes information listed within the DEVS website.  

DEVS 100AB/6.0:  Canada and the "Third World" (Fall/Winter)

Instructors:  David McDonald (Fall) and Karen Dubinsky (Winter)

Course Title: Canada and the "Third World"

Introduces basic theoretical concepts of development studies, the history of global inequality, the role of local and transnational actors and institutions such as the World Bank, key debates in development policy, and short histories of alternative development strategies. Case studies of Canada's ties to the so-called "third world" will include missionaries, military, business, and aid. Canadian colonialism over First Nations peoples will introduce basic issues in Aboriginal Studies.

DEVS 220/3.0:  Introduction to Indigenous Studies (Fall)

Instructor:  Rebecca Hall

Course Title: Introduction to Indigenous Studies

An introduction to Indigenous ways of knowing organized on a historical basis, from creation to present day, emphasizing Indigenous cultures and experiences in Canada. Students will critically examine colonialism. Indigenous perspectives will be introduced through lecture, reading and assignments, and from contributions from elders, members of Indigenous communities and Indigenous scholars.

NOTE: Also offered as a distance course in alternate years. Consult Arts and Science Online at https://www.queensu.ca/artsci/programs-and-degrees/online-and-distance-courses

DEVS 221/3.0: Topics in Indigenous Human Ecology (Winter)

Instructor:  Ian Fanning

Course Title: Topics in Indigenous Human Ecology

Indigenous Human Ecology re-evaluates conventional knowledge based on Indigenous knowledge, worldview, and culture. Introduction to an Indigenous perspective on contemporary issues. Lectures and discussion provide detailed examinations of topics such as contemporary issues in Indigenous healing, art, teaching and learning, socio-political life.

PREREQUISITE DEVS 220/3.0

NOTE Also offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning Hours may vary.

DEVS 221-700/3.0:  Topics in Indigenous Human Ecology (ONLINE) (Winter)

Instructor:  Ian Fanning

Course Title: Topics in Indigenous Human Ecology

Indigenous Human Ecology re-evaluates conventional knowledge based on Indigenous knowledge, worldview, and culture. Introduction to an Indigenous perspective on contemporary issues. Lectures and discussion provide detailed examinations of topics such as contemporary issues in Indigenous healing, art, teaching and learning, socio-political life. 

PREREQUISITE DEVS 220/3.0

 

DEVS 230/3.0: The Global Political Economy of Development (Fall)

Instructor:  Susanne Soederberg

Course Title: The Global Political Economy of Development

This course introduces students to important debates, concepts and themes in the global political economy of development. Using a political economy perspective, we examine how different types of power relations are formed around the production, distribution and consumption of goods across local, national and international settings. We also examine how these power relations structure the institutions, processes and outcomes of global development.  The course proceeds historically starting with an examination of the ways in which post-colonial countries were integrated into the world economy in the decades following the Second World War. Subsequently, we use this as a basis to examine more contemporary issues including good governance, free trade, and corporate social responsibility. No prior study of economics is needed for this course – we will be concerned with the real world of development, not abstract mathematical models.

NOTE: Also offered as a distance course. Consult Arts and Science Online at https://www.queensu.ca/artsci/programs-and-degrees/online-and-distance-courses

PREREQUISITE DEVS 100/6.0 (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently in exceptional circumstances).

DEVS 230-700/3.0: The Global Political Economy of Development (ONLINE) (Winter)

Instructor:  Mark Hostetler

Course Title: The Global Political Economy of Development

This course introduces students to important debates, concepts and themes in the global political economy of development. Using a political economy perspective, we examine how different types of power relations are formed around the production, distribution and consumption of goods across local, national and international settings. We also examine how these power relations structure the institutions, processes and outcomes of global development.  The course proceeds historically starting with an examination of the ways in which post-colonial countries were integrated into the world economy in the decades following the Second World War. Subsequently, we use this as a basis to examine more contemporary issues including good governance, free trade, and corporate social responsibility. No prior study of economics is needed for this course – we will be concerned with the real world of development, not abstract mathematical models.

PREREQUISITE DEVS 100/6.0 (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently in exceptional circumstances).

DEVS 240/3.0: Culture and Development (Winter)

Instructor:  Ayca Tomac

Course Title: Culture and Development

This course will explore how theories and practices of 'development' are entwined with different conceptions of culture. It starts by examining how the West constructed itself as the civilising force in the world and viewed the mass poverty of 'Third World' peoples as a product of their conservative traditions and cultural practices. The course will examine ways that colonial perceptions and practices still imbue development discourse today, and how they are being challenged. How have new social movements, art forms, and technologies opened up to engage with, resist and contest the current model of market driven development, and how does the latter incorporate or co-opt the critiques? Specific topics will include science, religion, sports, art and music. After completing the course, students should be able to demonstrate a critical awareness of everyday events in the Global South and among indigenous peoples as reported, for example, in the media or as performed through hip hop and the many other forms of resistance culture.

PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0. (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently in exceptional circumstances).

DEVS 250/3.0: Global Environmental Transformations (Fall)

Instructor:  Marcus Taylor

Course Title: Global Environmental Transformations

Examines  the  relationship  between  development  and  environmental  change  by  introducing  social  science  perspectives  on  themes  including energy,  agriculture,  climate,  urbanisation  and  water.  With  a  focus on combining macro and micro analysis, the course reflects on the meaning of development in an era of global environmental transformation.

PREREQUISITES:  Level two standing or above

DEVS 260/3.0: Globalization Gender and Development (Winter)

Instructor:  Reena Kukreja

DEVS 260 Globalization, Gender, and Development is designed for those interested in undertaking a critical analysis of the gendered impact of the globalization process and development policies with a focus on women in the Global South.

NOTE: Also offered as a distance course. Consult Arts and Science Online at https://www.queensu.ca/artsci/programs-and-degrees/online-and-distance-courses

DEVS 260-700/3.0: Globalization Gender and Development ONLINE (Fall)

Instructor:  Ayca Tomac

DEVS 260 Globalization, Gender, and Development is designed for those interested in undertaking a critical analysis of the gendered impact of the globalization process and development policies with a focus on women in the Global South.

DEVS 280-700/3.0: Global Engagement ONLINE (Fall)

Instructor:  Mark Hostetler

Course Title: Global Engagement

This course explores current thinking around the motivations for, and ethical implications of, working with communities on issues of social justice, inequality, and sustainable development. Students will engage in self-reflexive practices and work collaboratively to create tools and action plans for ethical global engagement in the future.

DEVS 293-001: Practical Issues in International Development (Winter)

Instructor:  Robert Aucoin

Course Title:  Practical Issues in International Development

In addition to the day to day challenges like communications concerns, safety issues, health issues, what are the practical skills a practitioner of international development should possess? This course will explore practical issues in international development with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. Examples will be drawn from lived-experiences working and living in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America and will use case studies, gaming simulations and lectures to explore applied topics in international development. Topics include: Conducting Needs Assessment, Workshop/Training Development, Monitoring and Evaluation with a focus on measurement, formative evaluation and theory of change, an introduction to Program Planning, Intercultural Communications and Competence, Leadership, Program Funding including public/private partnerships and Entrepreneurialism

Prerequisite  Level 2 or above and registration in any DEVS plan or permission of the department

DEVS 300/3.0: Cross-Cultural Research Methods (Winter)

Instructor:  Mark Hostetler

Course Title: Cross-Cultural Research Methods

How do we go from an idea or question to designing a research project to answer it?  Students will learn how to prepare and design cross-cultural research projects for international development work, to understand and use selected methods from a critical perspective, to understand important elements underlying successful fieldwork and to learn to develop a development research proposal. We will cover research design, choosing the instruments, cross-checking and in-the-field analysis, entering the field, choosing the informants, analyzing the data and proposal writing.

PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0 and DEVS 240/3.0 (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently with DEVS 230/3.0 or DEVS 240/3.0 in exceptional circumstances).

DEVS 305/6.0: Cuban Culture and Society (Winter)

Instructors:  Karen Dubinsky and Susan Lord

Course Title: Cuban Culture and Society

This course is designed to introduce students to Cuban society and culture. The course will focus especially on the period from the Cuban revolution (1959) to the present. Students will examine some of the main events and highlights of Cuban history, politics and culture in this era. Two weeks of this four-week intensive course will take place at Queen's and two weeks at the University of Havana.

NOTES

  1. Students are expected to pay an ancillary fee for travel and accommodation while in Havana. Estimated cost $3,000.
  2. Students must apply to take the course. Applications are available in the DEVS office.
  3. Students are expected to attend a pre-departure orientation.
  4. Costs and application deadlines will be posted on the DEVS website.

DEVS 305, an interdisciplinary course 6.0 unit course which also counts towards degree requirements in the departments of Film and Media Studies, Sociology, Languages, Literatures and Cultures, and History, will be taught over Winter and part of Spring term.

PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any Arts and Science Plan.

For more information see Global Development Studies department website: https://www.queensu.ca/devs/undergraduate/international-study-program-cuba
See also Queen's Cuban Culture and Society course page on Facebook www.facebook.com/QueensCubanCultureAndSocietyCourse

DEVS 340/3.0: Theories of Development (Fall)

Instructor:  Paritosh Kumar

Course Title: Theories of Development

Provides students with an overview of theories that underpin the development enterprise, and critiques of development, through the use of primary texts and critical appraisals. Syllabus

PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0 and DEVS 240/3.0. (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently with DEVS 230/3.0 or DEVS 240/3.0 in exceptional circumstances).

DEVS 351/3.0: Labour and Global Development -(Not offered 2019/2020)

Instructor:   Marcus Taylor

Course Title: Labour and Global Development

Explores the relationships between the production of goods, the lives and livelihoods of workers, and socio-economic development at local, national and global levels. Issues include: the international division of labour; global commodity chains; technological change; labour markets; informal sector; genders in production; unions and labour rights. 

PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0.
EQUIVALENCY:  DEVS 311/3.0

DEVS 352/3.0: Technology and Development (Fall)

Instructor:   Mark Hostetler

Course Title: Technology and Development

This course teams Arts and Science with Applied Science students to explore and analyse different theoretical and practical perspectives on technology and development. Students then apply their evolving collective understanding to the creation of a proposal for a technology related development project. Throughout the course, we introduce students to the socio-economic, cultural and political factors surrounding technology and its relationship to the development in both advanced industrial societies and developing nations. We focus in particular on the interaction of politics and policy with technological choice and design, critically exploring ideas including appropriate, intermediate and sustainable technologies.

PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and (registration in any DEVS Plan or registration in any Applied Science Program), or permission of the Department.

EQUIVALENCY:  DEVS 330/3.0

DEVS 353/3.0: Business and Development (Winter)

Instructor:  Susanne Soederberg

Course Title:  Business and Development

Over the past several decades, business – particularly large multinational corporations - have come to play an increasingly dominant role in global development. This course will interrogate the structures, processes and practices employed by corporations as they forge new partnerships with states, inter-governmental organizations (e.g., the United Nations), non-governmental organizations. In so doing, we will use lectures, tutorials and case studies to learn about the anatomy of corporate power (legal structure, governance and decision making processes) and how this power is brokered across the globe through themes such as: divestment campaigns, microcredit, and shelter loans for slum dwellers, corporate philanthropy, disaster management, the sustainable development goals, and corporate social responsibility.

PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS Plan, or permission of the Department.
EQUIVALENCY:  DEVS 333/3.0

DEVS 354/3.0: Cities and Urbanization in the South (Winter)

Instructor:  David McDonald

Course Title:  Cities and Urbanization in the South

This course examines cities and urbanization in countries in the South, looking at similarities and differences between and across regions, and the extent to which these cities connect (or not) with urban areas in the North.

NOTE: Priority will be given to students registered in a DEVS Plan during course selection.
LEARNING HOURS 120 (24L;12T;84P)
PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and (DEVS 230/3.0 or DEVS 250/3.0)
EQUIVALENCY DEVS 270/3.0 AND DEVS 292/3.0 Topic: Urganization in the South

DEVS 355/3.0: AIDS, Power, and Poverty (Not offered 2019/2020)

Instructor:  Marc Epprecht

Course Title:  AIDS, Power, and Poverty

HIV/AIDS remains one of the most pressing development issues in the world today.  This course examines the cultural, political, economic, and other social factors that contribute to its transmission and intractability, and which help to explain the differential impact of the disease upon societies worldwide.  Particular attention is paid to the ways that specific social/sexual identities and practices arising from inequitable class, gender, race, and ethnic relations, affect the prevalence of HIV, the ability to contain its spread, and the human costs that it entails. 

PREREQUISITES    One of:  DEVS 100/6.0, DEVS 200/3.0, DEVS 210/3.0,  DEVS 220/3.0, DEVS 221/3.0, DEVS 230/3.0, HLTH 101/3.0; and third-year standing
EQUIVALENCY:  DEVS 320/3.0

DEVS 356/3.0: The Political Economy of Resource Extraction (Winter)

Instructor:  Rebecca Hall

Course Title:  The Political Economy of Resource Extraction

This course analyzes the political economy of resource extraction, focusing on Canadian extraction, domestically and globally. Students will critically examine historical and contemporary extraction and its role in economies, livelihoods and transnational movement (e.g. migration and colonialism), and explore alternative extractive futures.

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;84P)
PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and (DEVS 230/3.0 or DEVS 250/3.0)
EXCLUSION(S) DEVS 392/3.0 Topic: The Political Economy of Resource Extraction.

DEVS 357/3.0: Global Conflict and Local Peacebuilding (Not offered in 2019-2020)

Instructor: 

Course Title: Global Conflict and Local Peacebuilding

Examining issues facing Indigenous individuals & communities that include ongoing cycles of violence, historical unresolved grief, the transmission of intergenerational trauma, & systemic injustice. Determinants of conflict, war, & disputes by navigating a complex landscape that includes race, gender, & the commodification of violence are examined.
LEARNING HOURS 120(36L;18I;66P)
PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and (DEVS 220/3.0)
EXCLUSION(S) DEVS 392/3.0 Topic: Global Conflict and Local Peacebuilding

DEVS 361-700/3.0: Project Planning and Policy Advocacy ONLINE  (Winter)

Instructors:  Mark Hostetler and Scott Rutherford

Course Title: Project Planning and Policy Advocacy

The course prepares students for fieldwork in global development. It connects theory with practice through in‐depth, skills‐based modules on economic literacy, results‐based management (RBM), and policy advocacy. Students will apply core concepts and best practices to effective proposal writing, project management, and policy advocacy.

NOTE Only offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online.
LEARNING HOURS 120 (72O;48P)
PREREQUISITE [(DEVS 240/3.0 or DEVS 280/3.0) and (Level 2 or above or registration in GAEN certificate)] or permission of instructor.

DEVS 362-700/3.0: Globally Engaged Experiential Learning ONLINE (Not offered in 2019/2020)

Course Title: Globally Engaged Experiential Learning

This course builds on DEVS 280/3.0 by facilitating an 80‐hour experience related to global engagement. Students will engage with concepts of ethical engagement and relationship building as they are guided through a practical experiential learning opportunity in the field of global engagement. NOTE Only offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. LEARNING HOURS 120 (72O;48P) PREREQUISITE [(Level 2 or above or registration in the GAEN certificate) and DEVS 280/3.0] or permission of the instructor.

DEVS 363/3.0: Contemporary Southern Africa: Development Trends and Challenges (Fall)

Instructor:  Marc Epprecht

Course Title: Contemporary Southern Africa: Development Trends and Challenges

This course first provides the historical and regional context necessary to understand urban southern Africa’s contemporary struggles, then examines strategies to address key development challenges and how they may be creating opportunities for new ways of thinking about citizenship in South Africa and the Global South more generally.

NOTE:  DEVS 363 is the qualifying course for students who wish to attend the summer study program in South Africa. 

LEARNING HOURS 120 (24L;12T;8G;84P)
PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above

DEVS 392-001/3.0:  Non-Governmental Organisations, Policy making and Development (Fall)

Instructor:  Diana Córdoba

Course Title:  Non-Governmental Organisations, Policy Making, and Development

Non-governmental organization (NGOs) have become key actors in the world of development influencing both the decision-making process and policy implementation. This course aims to provide students with basic knowledge and skills in preparation for work in the NGOs’ sector and a critical overview of the major issues involved in their interventions. The first part of the course introduces students to critical theories and debates on NGOs’ governance, state-society relationships and democracy. Special attention is given to the role and effectiveness of NGOs to influence the decision-making process and to impact policy implementation. The second part of the course focuses on NGOs’ managerial practices and knowledges and the challenges and constraints associated with their growing dependency on external funding. Thus, students explore aspects such as NGOs’ organisational management, legitimacy and accountability, the way these organisations facilitate capacity development, and NGOs future opportunities. Using a case-based approach, in the third part of the course students analyze the structures, missions and intervention approaches in a variety of international NGO areas such as agricultural development, poverty reduction, climate change adaptation and mitigation, women’s rights, and humanitarian relief. Prerequisite Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS plan .

PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS Plan, or permission of the Department.

DEVS 392-002/3.0:  Global Development and Social Movements(Fall)

Instructor:  M. Omar Faruque

Course Title:  Global Development and Social Movements

This course offers students an interdisciplinary perspective on hyper-globalization and social movements in the Global South. Hyper-globalization has created enormous development challenges for many countries in the Global South. Bottom-up responses in the form of social movements, often dubbed ‘globalization-from-below,’ have emerged to contest the rules of hyper-globalization through social-justice oriented interventions. Using lecture materials, case studies, and relevant documentaries, this course dissects both phenomena to emphasize critical aspects of the development-social movement nexus in the era of hyper-globalization. It consists of two parts. Part 1 focuses on thematic issues of contemporary globalization and development. Part 2 looks at how various social movements in the Global South confront the challenges and offer alternative development and policy choices

PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS Plan, or permission of the Department.

DEVS 392-001/3.0:  Rethinking Project Design and Management (Winter)

Instructor:  Andrew Russell

Course Title:  Rethinking Project Design and Management

15 years after the Paris Declaration on Development Effectiveness, many development projects are still delivered in a linear, top-down fashion, often in response to donor demands to “fit” within centrally-defined funding categories, results frameworks, and timeframes. Despite commitments made in Paris to strengthen developing country ownership, these projects are not always aligned with local priorities, placing undue burden on those receiving aid. In addition, it is increasingly evident that the government-led approach underpinning the Paris agenda is inadequate to achieve the ambitious 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Against this challenging setting, a variety of innovative methods for project design and management have emerged that seek to foster greater local ownership and relevance, increase flexibility to adapt to changes in the external context, and create alignment and linkages with other change processes at a systems level. This course will introduce students to some of these approaches, including human-centred design, innovation labs, agile, U-process, systems thinking, and participatory evaluation, as well as to innovative finance mechanisms such as social impact bonds and crowdfunding. Students will be provided with opportunities to test out these and other similar approaches in real-life situations.

Prerequisite  Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS plan AND Department Approval Required.
NOTE:  Fourth year DEVS students have priority to this course until open enrollment begins on July 25, 2019

DEVS 393-001/3.0: Migrations, Refugees and Development (Winter)

Instructor:  Reena Kukreja

Course Title:  Migrations, Refugees and Development

In this course, students will examine forced and voluntary migration in the context of contemporary global, regional, and national political and economic changes. They will learn about legal definitions and classifications of migrant populations including: asylum seekers, stateless populations, irregular migrant, economic migrant, refugees, and internally displaced persons (IDPs). The students will also analyse situations where people are forced to move for reasons of famine, poverty, environmental and development - induced displacement, war, or conflict. Underlying the analysis will be an intersectional approach that situates movements of people within matrixes of power such as gender, race, class, caste, ethnicity, location, and other social relations of differences. Lastly, state polices, and humanitarian responses will be studied in response to forced or voluntary movements of people.

PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS Plan, or permission of the Department.
Exclusions:  DEVS 293/3.0: Migrations, Refugees and Development

DEVS 410/6.0: Work Placement in Development Studies (Summer)

Instructor:   Please contact DEVS Undergraduate Chair

Course Title: Work Placement in Development Studies

Provides students with first-hand experience working with an agency involved in international development, either in Canada or abroad. The placement will normally be for 10-20 weeks, to be negotiated with the sponsoring agency. Students are required to attend preparatory meetings, prepare a work-study proposal, a research paper on the placement and maintain a journal on a continuing basis while on their placement. In addition to academic requirements, students are required to enroll in the Queen's Emergency Support Program, attend pre-departure orientation and complete Queen's Off-Campus Activity Safety Policy (OCASP) requirements.

NOTE Students are normally responsible for all costs associated with participation in this course.

PREREQUISITES Level 3 or above and registration in the DEVS Major Plan and departmental approval in advance from the Head of Global Development Studies.

COREQUISITE DEVS 411/3.0 (Under special circumstances a student can substitute DEVS 502/3.0 (Directed Readings in Development Studies) for DEVS 411/3.0. Permission for the latter may be granted to students who have completed all other degree requirements, and who do not need to return to Queen's University campus following completion of their placement. Students must seek prior approval from the Placement Coordinator, Global Development Studies for this option).

EXCLUSION No more than 1 course from DEVS 410/6.0; DEVS 420/3.0; DEVS 432/6.0.

DEVS 411/3.0: Post Placement Seminar in Development Studies (Fall)

Instructor:   Paritosh Kumar

Course Title: Post Placement Seminar in Development Studies

Required for students who have successfully completed the course requirements for DEVS 410. The course will provide a forum for students to debrief and to critically examine their placement experience. Evaluation based on presentation, participation, journal synthesis and a final report.

PREREQUISITE DEVS 410/6.0 and Level 3 or above and registration in the DEVS Major Plan and departmental approval in advance from the Placement Coordinator, Global Development Studies.

ONE-WAY EXCLUSION May not be taken with or after DEVS 420/3.0; DEVS 421/3.0.

DEVS 420/3.0: Study Placement in Development Studies (Fall)

Instructor:   Please contact DEVS Undergraduate Assistant

Course Title: Study Placement in Development Studies

Participation in an organized educational or cultural exchange, either

i) one term of studies at a developing-country university, or

ii) an exchange program in a developing-country setting with an organization such as Canada World Youth or Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute for at least 6 weeks.

Students are required to prepare a work-study proposal, a risk assessment of their placement and attend a pre-departure orientation. Assessment will also be based on a journal and final report.

NOTE Students are normally responsible for all costs associated with this course.

PREREQUISITES Level 3 or above and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan and departmental approval in advance from the Placement Coordinator, Global Development Studies.

EXCLUSION No more than 1 course from DEVS 410/6.0; DEVS 420/3.0;

EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 420/3.0; DEVS 421/3.0.

DEVS 492-001/3.0: Development and the Global Agrofood System (Fall)

Instructor:  Paritosh Kumar

Course Title: Development and the Global Agrofood System

There can be little doubt that the current era is witnessing dramatic change in the global production and consumption of food. In some respects this represents that continuation of previous trends. However, in number of important ways agricultural restructuring in the late twentieth century appears completely new. Using a diverse disciplinary perspective, this course analyses key aspects of contemporary changes in the global agro-food system. Topics covered will range from industrialization and corporate control of food and farming, the geography of more ‘flexible’ forms of manufacturing and service provisions, feminization of agricultural labour, localized and place-based agriculture, non-agricultural uses of agro-food resources, financialization of food, food sovereignty to new landscapes of consumption, changing forms of political organization and protests and the relationship between food and culture, specifically how communities and societies identify and express themselves through food.

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 492-002/3.0: Approaches to Sustainable Livelihood Development (Fall)

Instructor:  Mark Hostetler

Course Title: Approaches to Sustainable Livelihood Development

Sustainable livelihoods approaches have become increasingly important in the discussion of development over the past few decades. These approaches are concerned with understanding the various resources and strategies that people draw on to construct, improve and defend their livelihoods in ways they find meaningful. In this course, we will explore a variety of related theoretical perspectives including those focused on social (and other) capital, human capabilities, and agency. After reviewing these approaches, we will evaluate their efficacy for analysing a variety of rural, urban, and peri-urban development case studies. Based on our review of theory and its application to case studies, students will be tasked with developing their own framework for analysing livelihoods and identifying possible avenues for contributing to their enhancement.

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 492-003/3.0:  The ‘African Renaissance’ in Global Perspective (Fall)

Instructor:  Marc Epprecht

Course Title: The ‘African Renaissance’ in Global Perspective

This course will evaluate the premises and promises of the “African renaissance” (or “Africa rising” narrative) in relation to global trends, notably, climate change, the rise of China and South-South trade, and protectionism/xenophobia in the West. It begins with a critical overview of the history of underdevelopment under colonial and neo-colonial conditions, including through unequal relations in the production of knowledge about Africa. Students then examine a specific proposed “renaissance” strategy, critically assessing the debates and leading to mature reflection on “what next”? Topics include: aid versus trade, colonial borders/languages vs. indigenous cultures/languages, tourism, health, human rights, refugees/migration, social media, and much more. The major research essay will involve a case study of urban redevelopment in light of these global challenges.

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 492-004/3.0:  Development within Planetary Boundaries (Fall)

Instructor:  Kyla Tienhaara

Course Title: Development within Planetary Boundaries

The concept of sustainable development that first emerged over 30 years ago remains ambiguous and difficult to operationalize. In the past decade, a number of possibly competing concepts of have risen to prominence in international discourse such as ‘green growth’. In this course, we will explore differences between sustainable development and green growth and consider whether either offers a viable path for economic development within planetary boundaries. Additionally, we will compare these mainstream models with some of the more radical proposals for development in the ‘Anthropocene’.

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 492-005/3.0:  Protest, Policing, and Surveillance in the Canadian Context (Fall)

Instructor:  Miles Howes

Course Title: Protest, Policing, and Surveillance in the Canadian Context

The intersection between protest – a constitutionally entrenched right in Canada – and state police institutions is dynamic and rapidly evolving. With the rise of “big data” policing and the increasingly prevalent presence of pre-event surveillance, this course explores linear developments in protest theory and takes stock of the technological innovations that pervade the current protest-policing climate. We also explore whom and what constitutes a “threat” - and who escapes surveillance – within a protest context, how state policing institutions evaluate “risk”, and the implications upon individuals once such labels are affixed. This course makes use of current theoretical literature, but also relies upon primary source, “backstory”, documents. In formulating their in-class assignments, students will learn to utilize the Access to Information Act (ATI) as a methodological tool. Adding ATI to their research toolbox gives students the opportunity to generate innovative, academic, work. Evaluation within this course will be multi-dimensional. Students will be expected to consider – and critically analyze – varying theoretical standpoints. With such theoretical understandings in hand, students will learn to make use of ATI to access primary-source documents – and report back to the class on their findings and experiences at key stages of their research. A final research project will serve to demonstrate students' familiarity with ATI.

Prerequisite: Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan
Exclusions: DEVS 392, TOPIC: Protest, Policing, and Surveillance in the Canadian Context

DEVS 492-006/3.0: Foreign Policy from Below:  Culture, People, and International Relations (Fall)

Instructor:  Karen Dubinsky

Course Title: Foreign Policy from Below:  Culture, People, and International Relations

This seminar explores international relations that take place beyond the traditional world of the state.  In addition to government- to- government relations, there are plenty of other registers and areas in which relations between people of different nations take place.  The emphasis of this course is people-to-people relations. Topics will include: musical, educational and sports exchanges, soft power, cultural diplomacy, the NGO world, and tourism.  The focus is on Canada, the US and Latin America, but other examples will be included. 

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 492-007/3.0:  Privatization and its Discontents (Fall)

Instructor:  David McDonald

Course Title: Privatization and its Discontents

This course reviews the theory and practice of public versus private provision of essential services such as water, electricity and health care, with a focus on countries in the South. Part One of the course examines neoclassical conceptions of ‘public’ and ‘private’ and the theoretical rationale for privatization. We explore the various ways that services are privatized and commercialized, including a discussion of how these various forms of privatization work in practice and the extent of privatization in countries in the South. Part Two examines alternative conceptualizations of publicness, reviews different critiques of privatization, and explores emerging public alternatives for service delivery, ranging from ‘the commons’ to remunicipalization, as well as the people and organizations driving these developments.

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 492-008/3.0:  Examining Migration at the intersections of Gender, Race, and Masculinity (Fall)

Instructor:  Reena Kukreja

In recent years, the study of migration has moved to the centre stage of development policy and development theorisation. As the movement and numbers of migrants has increased globally, populist backlash against certain classes and categories of migrants has gained momentum with restrictive visa and border control regimes and rhetoric of hate. This has thrown theoretical and practical challenges for development studies, most notably the relationships between migration and urbanization, industrialization, precarious work, remittance economy, family structure, gender roles, ideology. There is a pressing need to understand how migration, restrictive border controls, neoliberal citizenship, and the construction of migrant ‘illegality’ are affecting societies and, (re)shaping work strategies, gender relations, gender roles, and masculinity, among others. This intensive course will challenge you to rethink the interface between development and migration by undertaking an analysis of voluntary or involuntary migratory trajectories of people in the contemporary moment. By keeping at the centre of its inquiry, intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality, and masculinity, the course will provide cutting-edge theorisation about how these interfaces impact migration patterns, policies, societies, and, most importantly, the lived experiences of the migrants. The focus of the course will be North America and Europe as ‘receiving’ regions. It will adopt an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on literature ranging from migration studies, critical masculinity studies, and gender studies and diverse material including auto-ethnographies, photovoice, documentaries, and films in facilitating a nuanced theoretical grounding on this subject.

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 492-001/3.0:  Political Ecology (Winter)

Instructor:  Diana Córdoba

Course Title:  Political Ecology

The interdisciplinary field of Political ecology highlights the relevance of power and politics for shaping the relationship between humans and their environments. It first emerged in the 1970s and 1980s with the specific aim of challenging ‘apolitical’ accounts of human-environment relations that rely upon simplistic causal links between population growth, poverty, environmental degradation and social conflicts. In the first part of this course, we will explore core theoretical, conceptual, and methodological trends and debates in the field of political ecology. In the second part, we will cover a range of cases of environmental problems in various socio-ecological contexts including those concerned with forests, agriculture, water, fisheries and range lands. We will also look for inspiration through the transformative work of organizations, communities and movements crafting solutions to environmental problems. The overall goal of this course is thus to introduce students to important contexts and tools for analyzing the complexity of human systems and their relationships to the natural world and for contributing to solutions to environmental problems.

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 492-002:  Transnational Feminism and Gender Justice (Winter)

Instructor:  Rebecca Hall

Course Title:  Transnational Feminism and Gender Justice

Through time and across borders, critical feminist theories and practices have sought to do far more than insert women higher in the echelons of global power structures: they have sought to dismantle these power structures, and to imagine and practice a different world. Grounded in the insights of critical feminist theory, this course will focus on sites of feminist struggle, examining both transnational continuities and differentiations in an unequal world. The first half of the course will be devoted to engagement with key theoretical texts in anti-racist and anti-colonial feminisms, Indigenous feminisms, queer feminisms, socialist feminisms and feminist political economy. In the second half of the course, students will apply these theories in the analysis of contemporary transnational feminist struggles (including, but not limited to, transnational care networks; state surveillance of intimate identities and labours; gender-based violence; reproductive rights; and, subsistence and ecological justice).

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan

DEVS 492-003:  Energy Democracy (Winter)

Instructor:  David McDonald

Course Title:  Energy Democracy

Energy democracy is a relatively new concept that refers to a transformation of the ways in which we produce and consume energy that are more socially and economically just as well as environmentally sustainable. There are radically different visions for what this means in practice, however, with competing notions of what constitutes democratic engagement, who should own and operate energy facilities, what role new technologies should play, etc. This course will focus on electricity in particular, examining spaces of energy poverty and different strategies for improving electricity access and affordability while at the same time expanding democratic engagement and public ownership. The emphasis will be on renewable forms of electricity, comparing energy democracy struggles in the North and the South, with states and communities employing very different strategies to address local contexts while at the same time fighting global challenges such as climate change. Topics to be covered include the shifting roles of (renewable) electricity in global capitalism, the uneven impacts of disruptive technologies, debates over decentralization and decarbonization, and gendered differentials in electricity access. Prerequisite: Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 492-004/3.0: Global Governance (Winter)

Instructor:  Susanne Soederberg

Course Title: Global Governance

Like many fashionable terms in academia and policymaking circles, global governance has all too often escaped critical evaluation. Situating this moving target in the wider context of global political economy, we interrogate the institutional, discursive and regulatory features of global governance by exploring a wide variety of contemporary themes and issues, such as global political ecology (disasters), global displacement (refugees), global aid, global risk management, rule of law, slum rehabilitation, planetary urbanism, financial crises, corruption and tax havens, and so forth across varied levels of governance ranging from global institutions (European Union, World Bank, World Economic Forum, UN-HABITAT) to national and municipal institutions. In so doing, we ask: who benefits from global governance? Whose values are being promoted, and why? And, finally, who and/or is to be governed, and why?

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 492-005/3.0:  Alliance Politics, Solidarity Movements in the Global Context  (Winter)

Instructor:  Ayca Tomac

Course Title: Alliance Politics, Solidarity Movements in the Global Context

This course provides an overview of a variety of dissident social movements from around the world with a specific focus on solidarity praxis. It situates itself in relation to both academic and "activist" perspectives on the interconnected power relations such as colonialism, nationalism, neoliberal capitalism and heteropatriarchy in the global context while tracing the dissident engagements with these power relations such as feminist, LGBTQ, socialist, anarchist and anti-colonial movements. Utilizing the critical scholarship on social movements, alliance politics and solidarity building, the course will focus on the relevance and significance of solidarity praxis while analyzing the intersections and interrelations of historical and current tendencies within the dissident movements. The course will equip students with tools to critically engage with the constructions of concepts like identity, "activism", collective action and street politics along with social movements such as indigenous resurgence, feminist, anti-heterosexist organizing and the so-called "Arab Spring", "Occupy" and "Gezi".

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 492-006/3.0:  Indigenous Theory (Winter)

Instructor:  Robert Lovelace

Course Title: Indigenous Theory

In recent years the term indigenous has become popular in describing Aboriginal people in Canada. This course goes beyond the euphemistic and often politically expedient use of the term to explore the meaning of Indigeneity, the emerging scholarship in Indigenous theory, and the current processes of re-indigenization. Students will explore legal and cultural applications of indigenous identity through a variety of contemporary readings and classroom discussions. Areas of interest will be economics, law, social/cultural development, colonization and de-colonization, and predictive futures. While this course will explore Aboriginal identity in Canada as part of the study, the focus is much broader in examining global indigenous realities as well as an expanded theoretical foundation.

Assessment in this course will be based on an individual contract negotiated between the student and professor within the first three weeks of the course beginning. Students will be expected to read all course material, take part in all informed classroom discussions, produce high quality academic writing or other forms of professional presentations, and meet periodically with the instructor.

Prerequisite:  Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 492-007/3.0:  Practical Approaches to Systems Change in Complex Peacebuilding Contexts (Winter)

Instructor:  Andrew Russell

Course Title: Practical Approaches to Systems Change in Complex Peacebuilding Contexts

The United Nations and other international and local organizations seeking to build sustainable peace in conflict and post-conflict situations too often work through standalone, issue-specific projects, partly in response to the demands of donors to “fit” within centrally-defined funding categories and timeframes. As a result, many of these efforts are designed and implemented in a linear “top-down” fashion, ignoring significant interdependencies and messy realities on the ground. We will examine how this tendency has played out in a variety of peacebuilding contexts, while reviewing how the theory and practice of peacebuilding has evolved over time to embrace and promote more holistic and systemic approaches. Building on this analysis, students will undertake practical programmatic design and evaluation exercises that will challenge them to think creatively and critically about the role of development professionals in complex systems

Prerequisite: Level 4 and registration in DEVS MAJ or MED plan.

DEVS 501/6.0: Honours Thesis in Development Studies

The course will involve a critical review of the literature on a clearly-defined topic relevant to development, a synthesis of ideas, and a final thesis under the supervision of a faculty member.

NOTE The student must identify a willing supervisor from DEVS or a cognate department and receive permission of the Department of Global Development Studies.

PREREQUISITES Minimum Cumulative GPA of 3.50 and Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan.

EXCLUSION DEVS 450/3.0.

DEVS 502/3.0: Directed Readings in Development Studies

This course enables a student or a group of students to explore a body of literature on a selected topic in development. The focus may be by theme, by region or by academic approach and can span the humanities, social sciences and environmental sciences. NOTE The students are responsible for approaching a professor with whom they wish to work and who is willing to undertake this project.

PREREQUISITES Minimum Cumulative GPA of 3.50 and Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan.

502 Approval form (updated 4May2016 - PDF 7KB)

502 Course outline (updated 4May2016 - PDF 21KB)